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all: port to Windows/ARM32 #26148

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jordanrh1 opened this Issue Jun 29, 2018 · 60 comments

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jordanrh1 commented Jun 29, 2018

Hi everyone, we will be submitting a patch in the near future that adds Windows/ARM32 support to GO. All but a few tests are passing, and this implementation has been used to compile GO itself and run Docker containers on Windows/ARM32. We look forward to working with the community to iron out the last remaining issues and get this merged!

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cznic commented Jun 29, 2018

I'm curious why was the port developed out-of-tree? I'm asking because I'm afraid it's much more complicated to properly review such a big change, as an port to new architecture is, in a single CL.

In any case, please check https://github.com/golang/go/blob/master/CONTRIBUTING.md and the linked from there https://golang.org/doc/contribute.html for more details.

(Personal wish: Please spell the name of the language as 'Go'.)

@bcmills bcmills added this to the Unplanned milestone Jun 29, 2018

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alexbrainman commented Jun 29, 2018

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jordanrh1 commented Jun 30, 2018

@cznic We were under a tight deadline and did not know if it was feasible. This is the earliest I could engage the community. We can break down the change into smaller chunks if necessary.

@alexbrainman Thanks for the link. We are committed to meeting the requirements outlined in the doc.

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alexbrainman commented Jun 30, 2018

We are committed to meeting the requirements outlined in the doc.

SGTM.

Alex

@agnivade agnivade changed the title Porting GO to Windows/ARM32 all: port to Windows/ARM32 Jun 30, 2018

@ALTree ALTree added the OS-Windows label Jul 10, 2018

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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125643 mentions this issue: dashboard: add windows-arm builder

gopherbot pushed a commit to golang/build that referenced this issue Jul 24, 2018

dashboard: add windows-arm builder
Updates golang/go#26148

Change-Id: I23a2c7bd1c2f8f7c960aaedfe0dcdee4e11825ab
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/125643
Reviewed-by: Andrew Bonventre <andybons@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125648 mentions this issue: cmd/link: support windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125649 mentions this issue: debug/pe: support windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125645 mentions this issue: runtime: add definitions for windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125647 mentions this issue: cmd/api: support windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Jul 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/125646 mentions this issue: cmd/dist: support windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Aug 8, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/128715 mentions this issue: runtime: support windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Aug 8, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/128716 mentions this issue: syscall: support windows/arm

@bradfitz bradfitz modified the milestones: Unplanned, Go1.12 Aug 14, 2018

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Aug 20, 2018

cmd/dist: support windows/arm
Updates #26148

Change-Id: I407481f9c0f8e3565dcfcbbc53e5aa7427d74680
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/125646
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Aug 20, 2018

debug/pe: support windows/arm
Enable 'go tool objdump' to disassemble windows/arm images.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: I7d11226f01d92288061f8e25980334b9bd82c41f
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/125649
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
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gopherbot commented Aug 20, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/130056 mentions this issue: cmd/dist: support windows/arm

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Aug 20, 2018

cmd/dist: support windows/arm
Updates #26148

Change-Id: I4744ebcc77fda3acc1301a1d8857754c0ee797fa
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/130056
Run-TryBot: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Aug 21, 2018

cmd/link: support windows/arm
Enable the Go linker to generate executables for windows/arm.

Generates PE relocation tables, which are used by Windows to
dynamically relocate the Go binary in memory. Windows on ARM
requires all modules to be relocatable, unlike x86/amd64 which are
permitted to have fixed base addresses.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: Ie63964ff52c2377e121b2885e9d05ec3ed8dc1cd
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/125648
Run-TryBot: Ian Lance Taylor <iant@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Aug 22, 2018

syscall: support windows/arm
Updates #26148

Change-Id: I008502232642237270b7c8a2efb4a378345d06fd
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/128716
Run-TryBot: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Ian Lance Taylor <iant@golang.org>
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gopherbot commented Aug 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/131282 mentions this issue: cmd/vet: remove exclusions for callbackasm

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Sep 18, 2018

runtime: support windows/arm
Updates #26148

Change-Id: I8f68b2c926c7b11dc86c9664ed7ff2d2f78b64b4
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/128715
Run-TryBot: Ian Lance Taylor <iant@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Ian Lance Taylor <iant@golang.org>
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gopherbot commented Sep 24, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/127665 mentions this issue: windows: add support for windows/arm

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gopherbot commented Dec 18, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/154758 mentions this issue: runtime: use QPC for nanotime and time.now on windows/arm

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jordanrh1 commented Dec 18, 2018

@hyangah FYI, the test is passing after fixing the time functions.

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 18, 2018

runtime: use QPC for nanotime and time.now on windows/arm
The previous implementation of nanotime and time.now used a time source
that was updated on the system clock tick, which has a maximum
resolution of about 1ms. On 386 and amd64, this time source maps to
the system performance counter, so has much higher resolution.
On ARM, use QueryPerformanceCounter() to get a high resolution timestamp.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: I1abc99baf927a95b472ac05020a7788626c71d08
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/154758
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
Run-TryBot: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
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gopherbot commented Dec 19, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/154761 mentions this issue: Revert "runtime: use QPC for nanotime and time.now on windows/arm"

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gopherbot commented Dec 19, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/154762 mentions this issue: runtime: use QPC to implement cputicks() on windows/arm

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 19, 2018

Revert "runtime: use QPC for nanotime and time.now on windows/arm"
This reverts change https://golang.org/cl/154758.

Restore the previous implementations of nanotime and time.now, which
are sufficiently high resolution and more efficient than
QueryPerformanceCounter. The intent of the change was to improve
resolution of tracing timestamps, but the change was overly broad
as it was only necessary to fix cputicks(). cputicks() is fixed in
a subsequent change.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: Ib9883d02fe1af2cc4940e866d8f6dc7622d47781
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/154761
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
Run-TryBot: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 20, 2018

runtime: use QPC to implement cputicks() on windows/arm
Tracing uses cputicks() to generate trace event timestamps. cputicks()
is expected to be a high resolution clock source. On Windows/ARM,
call QueryPerformanceCounter() which is the highest resolution clock
source available.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: I987fa556060b3d60c02f07b87b9e6320b9b026e2
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/154762
Reviewed-by: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
Reviewed-by: Austin Clements <austin@google.com>
Run-TryBot: Brad Fitzpatrick <bradfitz@golang.org>
TryBot-Result: Gobot Gobot <gobot@golang.org>
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jordanrh1 commented Dec 27, 2018

Getting closer:
image

The failing test is TestCallbackPanic(). I'm suspecting stack corruption.

I also want to modify cputicks() to call onosstack(_QueryPerformanceCounter, ...), and I want to modify onosstack() to not modify any global data. These routines are called deep in the scheduler and I am concerned they could be corrupting state.

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jordanrh1 commented Dec 28, 2018

Here is the issue with TestCallbackPanic().

TestCallbackPanic() tests what happens when Go code running in a callback panics. Go loads a native dll (user32.dll), calls a function that is expected to invoke a callback (EnumWindows), and then panics within the callback. It registers deferrals at several points, and verifies that the deferrals run and that the panic can be recovered from. In the Go function that calls EnumWindows, it registers a deferral to unload user32.dll when the function returns. That way, user32.dll will be unloaded no matter what, even if EnumWindows panics. This function looks like this:

// nestedCall calls into Windows, back into Go, and finally to f.
func nestedCall(t *testing.T, f func()) {
        c := syscall.NewCallback(callback)
        d := GetDLL(t, "user32.dll")
        defer d.Release()
        d.Proc("EnumWindows").Call(c, uintptr(*(*unsafe.Pointer)(unsafe.Pointer(&f))))
}

The problem arises in the interaction between EnumWindows and Go's panic unwinding logic. When Go encounters a panic in a callback, it unwinds the g0 stack to the point before the outgoing cgo call that invoked the callback was made. That means in this case it will reset the g0 stack pointer to what it was just before the call to EnumWindows. If you look at the stack pointer on entry of EnumWindows, and on entry of FreeLibrary (which is called by defer d.Release()), they are the same value. It is my understanding that this is by design. The logic that restores the stack pointer is in func unwindm:

                 // Restore sp saved by cgocallback during
                // unwind of g's stack (see comment at top of file).
                mp := acquirem()
                sched := &mp.g0.sched
                switch GOARCH {
                default:
                        throw("unwindm not implemented")
                case "386", "amd64", "arm", "ppc64", "ppc64le", "mips64", "mips64le", "s390x", "mips", "mipsle":
                        sched.sp = *(*uintptr)(unsafe.Pointer(sched.sp + sys.MinFrameSize)) // <-- restore sp from saved value on the stack
                case "arm64":
                        sched.sp = *(*uintptr)(unsafe.Pointer(sched.sp + 16))
                }

It restores the g0 stack pointer from the value saved on the stack by cgocallback. cgocallback saves m->g0->sched.sp to the stack, which was previously written by cgocall when EnumWindows was called.

havem:
        // Now there's a valid m, and we're running on its m->g0.
        // Save current m->g0->sched.sp on stack and then set it to SP.
        // Save current sp in m->g0->sched.sp in preparation for
        // switch back to m->curg stack.
        // NOTE: unwindm knows that the saved g->sched.sp is at 4(R13) aka savedsp-8(SP).
        MOVW    m_g0(R8), R3
        MOVW    (g_sched+gobuf_sp)(R3), R4     <--- load last saved value of g0's SP (when EnumWindows was invoked)
        MOVW    R4, savedsp-8(SP)              <--- save this value to the stack, where unwindm knows where to find it
        MOVW    R13, (g_sched+gobuf_sp)(R3)

So, the fact that we see FreeLibrary execute with the same stack pointer as EnumWindows seems to be by design. EnumWindows was not allowed to complete since a panic occurred while it was calling back into Go code, and it's stack was deallocated. This shouldn't be an issue, since it is generally an error to maintain references to stack local memory that outlive the stack frame.

This is where things get weird. EnumWindows isn't as straightforward as you might think. It allocates memory from the heap before invoking the callback, and frees this memory before it returns. It uses two mechanisms to ensure this memory gets cleaned up in case the callback experiences an error:

  • it tracks the allocations with a heap tracking mechanism. Bookkeeping for this allocation is stored on the stack
  • it has an SEH cleanup handler that frees the allocations and unlinks the bookkeeping information from the global tracking database

When the user32 module is unloaded, its garbage collector runs and scans for outstanding resources, which include outgoing calls that have not been completed, and their associated resources. Since the SEH handler never ran (because an explicit call to panic() does not trigger SEH handlers), the global tracking database still has a reference to the bookkeeping information that was stored on the stack. However, this stack space was deallocated, and new code is running over it, which corrupts the data. The bookkeeping code faults when it loads a bad pointer from the stack.

As you can see, this error occurs due to very specific interaction between Go's deferral mechanism, Go's callback mechanism, and user32's resource tracking mechanism. In order for C code to be go-panic-safe, it should not allocate any resources, and should not maintain any references to stack memory.

In terms of fixes, I'm not sure there's a way to ensure that C code which relies on SEH or C++ exceptions has a chance to clean up in case of a go panic. It seems best to recover() in the callback, and not panic across callback boundaries. Another option is to find a replacement for EnumWindows that is safe to panic across and use that for the test instead. @alexbrainman @ianlancetaylor , what do you think?

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ianlancetaylor commented Dec 28, 2018

Any idea why the test passes on x86? What's the key difference?

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jordanrh1 commented Dec 28, 2018

I think it has to do with how subsequent code overwrites the stack. If the data structure on the stack doesn't get overwritten, the error will not manifest. amd64 and x86 have the same underlying issue, but they must not corrupt the bookkeeping datastructure.

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alexbrainman commented Dec 28, 2018

I'm not sure there's a way to ensure that C code which relies on SEH or C++ exceptions has a chance to clean up in case of a go panic.

I agree. This is not implemented, and it won't be simple to implement.

It seems best to recover() in the callback, and not panic across callback boundaries.

I agree in general, but I don't think it is acceptable for our runtime tests. I think Go users write code that panics from callback and into call site function. We should try and make it work, if possible.

Another option is to find a replacement for EnumWindows that is safe to panic across and use that for the test instead

That sounds good. I don't remember who came up with EnumWindows to test it all, but anything else should be fine too. As long as it works and easily available on any Windows computer that is supported by Go.

Alex

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jordanrh1 commented Dec 29, 2018

@ianlancetaylor One of the reasons it doesn't readily manifest on amd64/386 is that amd64/386 tests run on Windows Desktop, which has a different implementation of user32 than IoT Core, which is where the ARM tests run. Iot Core uses 'minuser', which is a completely rewritten window manager. I was able to reproduce the exact crash on AMD64 by running the test on IoT Core. In the deferral, I called a function that used a large chunk of g0 stack (in a legal way), to ensure that any stack based data structures still referenced would be overwritten with garbage data. Later, when the user32 garbage collector crashed, it crashed in exactly the same place as ARM, because the stack-based bookkeeping structure had been overwritten in the deferral.

On ARM, to further confirm that stack corruption was the issue, I inserted code in callbackasm1 to save the current g0 SP so that when unwindm restores the g0 SP, it will restore it to a value that is safely below the stack for EnumWindows. With this change, the crash went away because EnumWindow's stack was no longer being overwritten in the deferral. The test ran many times successfully.

Given these findings I have increased confidence that this is the issue.

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gopherbot commented Dec 30, 2018

Change https://golang.org/cl/155923 mentions this issue: runtime: use EnumTimeFormatsEx instead of EnumWindows in callback tests

gopherbot pushed a commit that referenced this issue Dec 30, 2018

runtime: use EnumTimeFormatsEx instead of EnumWindows in callback tests
Use EnumTimeFormatsEx() to test panics across callback boundaries
instead of EnumWindows(). EnumWindows() is incompatible with Go's panic
unwinding mechanism. See the associated issue for more information.

Updates #26148

Change-Id: If1dd70885d9c418b980b6827942cb1fd16c73803
Reviewed-on: https://go-review.googlesource.com/c/155923
Run-TryBot: Alex Brainman <alex.brainman@gmail.com>
Reviewed-by: Alex Brainman <alex.brainman@gmail.com>
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jordanrh1 commented Dec 31, 2018

Exciting stuff:
image

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petemoore commented Jan 7, 2019

@jordanrh1 Is there an issue for porting to Windows/ARM64 too? Thanks.

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jordanrh1 commented Jan 7, 2019

@petemoore There is not.

@andybons andybons modified the milestones: Go1.12, Go1.13 Feb 12, 2019

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0xacf commented Feb 19, 2019

It seems exes built with GOOS=windows GOARCH=arm with the current master won't run on Windows RT 8.1, failing with "This app can't run on your PC". This is with code signature checking subverted. I haven't looked into it yet so I'm unsure of details and I know this platform is out of support, but is this a configuration that theoretically should be working? By the way, fantastic work.

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jordanrh1 commented Feb 19, 2019

You also need to specify GOARM=7. I'll look into whether there's a way to do this by default.

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0xacf commented Feb 19, 2019

Unfortunately it's still failing with the same error. I made sure to clear the Go build cache and delete the output .exe, so I'm fairly sure it is getting rebuilt properly. I've put my test file / command below.

$ cat hello.go
package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
  fmt.Println("hello, world")
}

$ GOOS=windows GOARCH=arm GOARM=7 ./go/bin/go build hello.go

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jordanrh1 commented Feb 20, 2019

If you have time, try starting it under the usermode debugger, and see if it offers any clues:

windbg.exe hello.exe

If it fails to start, then it's probably being rejected by the loader. To troubleshoot loader errors, connect kernel debugger and turn on loader snaps,

!gflag +sls

Then try running the program. Loader spew will be printed to the windbg window.

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0xacf commented Feb 20, 2019

I definitely have time to do some tests and try to fix this, but likewise, don't worry about this platform too much if nobody considers it important!

Unfortunately it appears security restrictions in Windows RT prevent the debugger from creating or attaching to processes. If you know of any other way to get log messages out of the linker / loader I'll happily try that, otherwise I'll reply later if I end up getting the debugger working somehow.

Edit: Running the program a different way, I can see it produces ERROR_BAD_EXE_FORMAT (%1 is not a valid Win32 application.)

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alexbrainman commented Mar 24, 2019

@jordanrh1 I managed to run windows-arm on one of my RPIs. The only bits I am still missing is git command. What do you do for git on windows-arm?

@bradfitz is there a git command that is written in pure Go? I would just compile it to windows-arm and use it there. I would not need anything fancy, just basic git functionality.

Thank you.

Alex

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bradfitz commented Mar 24, 2019

@alexbrainman, the builders don't use git. They only run the x/build/cmd/buildlet binary and the cmd/coordinator pushes code in tarballs at them.

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alexbrainman commented Mar 24, 2019

@alexbrainman, the builders don't use git.

Fair enough. I suppose I have to find a way to develop on this thing.

Alex

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jordanrh1 commented Mar 25, 2019

I do all my development on linux and cross compile to windows/arm.

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alexbrainman commented Mar 26, 2019

I do all my development on linux and cross compile to windows/arm.

I do too.

But I was trying to fix #30711. And that involved running cmd/go.TestScript, and cmd/go.TestScript runs go.exe executable. So I needed all moving parts. I used $GOROOT/src/bootstrap.bash (luckily for me it worked without a hitch) to create a snapshot of current Go tree with executables and built packages, and copied all these files onto RPI. And then run the test.

I did not have Git, so I had to be careful when changing files to fix #30711. The fix was small enough for me to manage without Git. But I would not use that setup for anything bigger than that.

RPI runs standard Windows file and printer sharing services, and I was able to mount shares from RPI on my Windows PC. Maybe (I did not try that) I could just use Git on my Windows PC to manage Go repo installed on RPI. I will see next time I use that.

Another thing. While debugging, I searched for windows-arm prebuilt image on https://golang.org/dl and it is not there. @bradfitz maybe we should put latest windows-arm image at https://golang.org/dl. I doubt there is need for ,msi file, but we should put .zip file alongside with 386 and amd64.

Also @jordanrh1 I struggled to make Windows 10 running on some of my RPIs.

I have RPI 3 B+. I downloaded "IoT Dashboard", and it gives me option of installing "Windows 10 IoT Core (17763)". I created SD card (ScanDisk Ultra 16GB), but RPI does not boot - red power light comes on, and I get rainbow image on my HDMI screen, but nothing happens.

I also have RPI 2 B. I tried booting this with the same image - red light is on, green light flashes 4 slow times followed by 4 quick times, same rainbow image on the screen.

I managed to run Windows on RPI 3 B. But I would like to make my other RPIs run Windows. Do you have any suggestions?

Also I noticed that windows-arm builder is not listed on https://build.golang.org Can you, please, investigate what happened to it?

I also wonder, if we could run windows-arm build on multiple RPI devices to make it faster?

Maybe we could even run it on virtual hardware (crazy idea). Like

https://www.newventuresoftware.com/blog/running-windows-10-iot-core-in-a-virtual-machine

or

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/30276610/how-to-deploy-windows-10-iot-rasp-pi-image-as-a-virtual-machine

Thank you.

Alex

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