False triggers #2

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mariusb57 opened this Issue Apr 13, 2017 · 86 comments

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I used this sensor with a esp8266 and i have a lot of false triggers. Seems to be strongly affect by the wireless network , in general , by strong electromagnetic fields . I tried to place him at a considerable distance from esp8266 and I used a lot of decoupling capacitors. Sure that the false switching operations were far fewer .
I would like to know if anyone met this problem and how to solve it .
If I mount a metalic shield on the back of the sensor, may this affect its detection properties ? Thanks .

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ym58 May 12, 2017

I've been struggling for WEEKS with a miniature DIY motion detector device built with RCWL-0516 + ESP8266 + mini 5V P/S.
It sometimes works flawlessly for hours then starts giving false triggers repetitively ... I even tried to get the radar sensor out of the casing in case it would work better when distant from the ESP, but to no avail :-(
I think this sensor is definitely prone to interferences and not reliable enough to be used in a motion detector device in the long run.
The only thing I haven't tried yet is to use a strong capacitor across the VCC input of the radar sensor, but I doubt it will help ...

ym58 commented May 12, 2017

I've been struggling for WEEKS with a miniature DIY motion detector device built with RCWL-0516 + ESP8266 + mini 5V P/S.
It sometimes works flawlessly for hours then starts giving false triggers repetitively ... I even tried to get the radar sensor out of the casing in case it would work better when distant from the ESP, but to no avail :-(
I think this sensor is definitely prone to interferences and not reliable enough to be used in a motion detector device in the long run.
The only thing I haven't tried yet is to use a strong capacitor across the VCC input of the radar sensor, but I doubt it will help ...

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underwoodblog May 13, 2017

Maby an isolated DC-DC converter can help to remove the interferences that come from the ESP to the RCWL over the supply voltage. I suggest some ferrites on the data and power cables to!

Maby an isolated DC-DC converter can help to remove the interferences that come from the ESP to the RCWL over the supply voltage. I suggest some ferrites on the data and power cables to!

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ym58 May 13, 2017

Good point.
The P/S I am using right now is this one : http://www.ebay.fr/itm/401301418281
I'll try to power it thru my lab P/S for testing purposes and will come back here to comment the results.
Thanks.

ym58 commented May 13, 2017

Good point.
The P/S I am using right now is this one : http://www.ebay.fr/itm/401301418281
I'll try to power it thru my lab P/S for testing purposes and will come back here to comment the results.
Thanks.

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mariusb57 May 14, 2017

I think I found a solution. I just use the electrical source from the above link but without mounting a filter it does not work properly. I used a pi filter (1000 microfarad +10 ohm + 1000 microfarad) mounted on the sensor supply (Vin). Of course, if there are "parasite generators" around the sensor, such as mechanical relays or mechanical switches, false flashes may occur. I use it with a ESP 8266, and a SSR G3MB-202 that has its own snubbering circuit and at its command sometimes false flashes occur . I have solved these problems in the software by temporarily disabling the pin to which the sensor is bound.

I think I found a solution. I just use the electrical source from the above link but without mounting a filter it does not work properly. I used a pi filter (1000 microfarad +10 ohm + 1000 microfarad) mounted on the sensor supply (Vin). Of course, if there are "parasite generators" around the sensor, such as mechanical relays or mechanical switches, false flashes may occur. I use it with a ESP 8266, and a SSR G3MB-202 that has its own snubbering circuit and at its command sometimes false flashes occur . I have solved these problems in the software by temporarily disabling the pin to which the sensor is bound.

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ym58 May 14, 2017

Mine is undertest since yesterday with a single 1000uF capacitor directly soldered on the Vin input.
The false flashes have considerably reduced but not totally disappeared.
I don't currently have any relay nor switching devices in my circuitry.
Is this the way you wired your Pi-filter ?
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9bth6k8vvs6nznv/RCWL-0516.jpg?raw=1
rcwl-0516

ym58 commented May 14, 2017

Mine is undertest since yesterday with a single 1000uF capacitor directly soldered on the Vin input.
The false flashes have considerably reduced but not totally disappeared.
I don't currently have any relay nor switching devices in my circuitry.
Is this the way you wired your Pi-filter ?
https://www.dropbox.com/s/9bth6k8vvs6nznv/RCWL-0516.jpg?raw=1
rcwl-0516

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mariusb57 May 14, 2017

Yes this is the configuration I've used .

Yes this is the configuration I've used .

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ym58 May 15, 2017

A bit of update ::
I tried to power my device with my lab P/S. No significative improvement, still having (random) false triggers.
Then, yesterday, I reconnected my 1USD-Chinese power supply ( http://www.ebay.fr/itm/401301418281 ) but I used mariusb57's pi-filter (see above) between Vin and Vcc .... so far, so good !
I'll carry on with the testing for another 48hrs and will keep you all posted.

ym58 commented May 15, 2017

A bit of update ::
I tried to power my device with my lab P/S. No significative improvement, still having (random) false triggers.
Then, yesterday, I reconnected my 1USD-Chinese power supply ( http://www.ebay.fr/itm/401301418281 ) but I used mariusb57's pi-filter (see above) between Vin and Vcc .... so far, so good !
I'll carry on with the testing for another 48hrs and will keep you all posted.

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ym58 May 17, 2017

So far, soooooooooooooo good !!!!

The pi-filter (thanks to Mariusb57) works like a charm : I never had any more false triggers since I installed it between Vcc (+5V) and the Vin input of RCWL-0516 sensor !

I wish I could now understand the exact way this 'resistor-only' pi-filter works as (normally) a pi-filter is made up of an inductor instead of a resistor ... any clue ?

ym58 commented May 17, 2017

So far, soooooooooooooo good !!!!

The pi-filter (thanks to Mariusb57) works like a charm : I never had any more false triggers since I installed it between Vcc (+5V) and the Vin input of RCWL-0516 sensor !

I wish I could now understand the exact way this 'resistor-only' pi-filter works as (normally) a pi-filter is made up of an inductor instead of a resistor ... any clue ?

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mariusb57 May 18, 2017

The pi filter is not my merit, I have read this :
http://tech.scargill.net/microwave-for-the-weekend/......
and I have made experiences for several days....

The pi filter is not my merit, I have read this :
http://tech.scargill.net/microwave-for-the-weekend/......
and I have made experiences for several days....

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ym58 May 18, 2017

I was a bit mistaken as it does not work THAT good.


Actually, as soon as I ***RE***case the whole thing together (ESP + RCWL + P/S), it starts giving me again false triggers, particularly when the sensor stands very close to the ESP32E ... it's just disappointing for I wanted to make the whole device dense and compact.


If I can't get rid of those interferences between the ESP and the sensor, I will definitely have to rethink my layout and keep the RCWL-0516 outside of the casing as I confirm that it works flawlessly whith the pi-filter and some room (5cm) between the ESP and the sensor ...

ym58 commented May 18, 2017

I was a bit mistaken as it does not work THAT good.


Actually, as soon as I ***RE***case the whole thing together (ESP + RCWL + P/S), it starts giving me again false triggers, particularly when the sensor stands very close to the ESP32E ... it's just disappointing for I wanted to make the whole device dense and compact.


If I can't get rid of those interferences between the ESP and the sensor, I will definitely have to rethink my layout and keep the RCWL-0516 outside of the casing as I confirm that it works flawlessly whith the pi-filter and some room (5cm) between the ESP and the sensor ...

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itsjustvenky Jul 19, 2017

Not only this I have other microwave sensors which works at different frequencies and all have problems if kept close to ESP chip. Even keeping little far from ESP once in a while I have false alarm, so I used 10uf + 0.1uf capacitors close to RCWL and this helped and I used software to determine whether its a false/real trigger.

Not only this I have other microwave sensors which works at different frequencies and all have problems if kept close to ESP chip. Even keeping little far from ESP once in a while I have false alarm, so I used 10uf + 0.1uf capacitors close to RCWL and this helped and I used software to determine whether its a false/real trigger.

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jbeale1 Aug 1, 2017

I have played with a HB100 (similar idea to RCWL-0516 but at 10 GHz). The HB100 has just a low-level analog output ("IF signal") so amplifying and detecting circuit must be added. Listening to that output (through a preamp, with headphones) you can clearly hear the pulsing 2.4 GHz packets coming from my wifi hub even from 10 feet away. So it's clear these devices will be sensitive to wifi signals and if it's in a case right next to a wifi transmitter like the ESP device, I'm sure that can interfere. I have played around with HB100 in a microwave horn (cardboard and aluminum foil) and with the RCWL-0516 in a cookie tin as a "cup antenna" like http://www.microwave.gr/content/view/175/1/ and this does give me somewhat more directivity and range. If the wifi module was on the other side of the metal reflector, that could help reduce interference, but obviously using an antenna structure also increases the size of the device a lot.

jbeale1 commented Aug 1, 2017

I have played with a HB100 (similar idea to RCWL-0516 but at 10 GHz). The HB100 has just a low-level analog output ("IF signal") so amplifying and detecting circuit must be added. Listening to that output (through a preamp, with headphones) you can clearly hear the pulsing 2.4 GHz packets coming from my wifi hub even from 10 feet away. So it's clear these devices will be sensitive to wifi signals and if it's in a case right next to a wifi transmitter like the ESP device, I'm sure that can interfere. I have played around with HB100 in a microwave horn (cardboard and aluminum foil) and with the RCWL-0516 in a cookie tin as a "cup antenna" like http://www.microwave.gr/content/view/175/1/ and this does give me somewhat more directivity and range. If the wifi module was on the other side of the metal reflector, that could help reduce interference, but obviously using an antenna structure also increases the size of the device a lot.

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jbeale1 Aug 1, 2017

By the way, Pin 12 of the IC on the RCWL-0516 device (it is an opamp output) gives you an analog signal somewhere between 0 and 3V that wiggles when you move your hand. So if you wanted to take that into an ADC input in a Arduino etc., you might be able to do some signal processing to detect or reject specific kinds of signals.

jbeale1 commented Aug 1, 2017

By the way, Pin 12 of the IC on the RCWL-0516 device (it is an opamp output) gives you an analog signal somewhere between 0 and 3V that wiggles when you move your hand. So if you wanted to take that into an ADC input in a Arduino etc., you might be able to do some signal processing to detect or reject specific kinds of signals.

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dipa57 Aug 10, 2017

Hi,
Does two RCWL 0516 on the same circuit, or on different circuits, affects each other?

dipa57 commented Aug 10, 2017

Hi,
Does two RCWL 0516 on the same circuit, or on different circuits, affects each other?

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barewires Aug 11, 2017

I tested three boards in proximity placed XYZ 1 cm minimum apart and they all appear to work independently with no interaction or interference. Two on the same circuit RaspberryPi 3 (or Zero W), powered from 5v and connected to GPIO Pin7 and Pin11 work just fine.
https://pinout.xyz/ for reference. Latest raspbian has pinout from the command line.

barewires commented Aug 11, 2017

I tested three boards in proximity placed XYZ 1 cm minimum apart and they all appear to work independently with no interaction or interference. Two on the same circuit RaspberryPi 3 (or Zero W), powered from 5v and connected to GPIO Pin7 and Pin11 work just fine.
https://pinout.xyz/ for reference. Latest raspbian has pinout from the command line.

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ramanraja Sep 9, 2017

Thanks for the note. I want to use two RCWL radars in the same enclosure. Can they be placed one BEHIND the other ? Two modules kept side by side appear to work without problems. But my application has a support structure right through the device, so I need to keep the two radars one behind the other. The sensitivity seems to have reduced drastically after this. Is that normal ?

Thanks for the note. I want to use two RCWL radars in the same enclosure. Can they be placed one BEHIND the other ? Two modules kept side by side appear to work without problems. But my application has a support structure right through the device, so I need to keep the two radars one behind the other. The sensitivity seems to have reduced drastically after this. Is that normal ?

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barewires Sep 9, 2017

The devices are omni-directional and it is only necessary to have one at each location maybe 2-3 m apart. This minute I placed a second device on top of the first, separated only by a piece of postit note as insulation and they respond almost at the same time. As the circuits are analog (op-amps, caps, resistors) the on/off timing is variable with each one being affected by local placement that changes the sensitivity. Both devices are connected by jumper wires approx 10 cm long. It is very important to keep all metal at least a cm apart. Stacked devices will have mutual interaction due to metal makeup of the boards. Once again, plugging directly into a breadboard with the mass of hidden metal contacts will seriously affect behaviour.

barewires commented Sep 9, 2017

The devices are omni-directional and it is only necessary to have one at each location maybe 2-3 m apart. This minute I placed a second device on top of the first, separated only by a piece of postit note as insulation and they respond almost at the same time. As the circuits are analog (op-amps, caps, resistors) the on/off timing is variable with each one being affected by local placement that changes the sensitivity. Both devices are connected by jumper wires approx 10 cm long. It is very important to keep all metal at least a cm apart. Stacked devices will have mutual interaction due to metal makeup of the boards. Once again, plugging directly into a breadboard with the mass of hidden metal contacts will seriously affect behaviour.

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malebuffy Sep 25, 2017

Has anybody found a way to make real use of this sensor? I would like to put it in a comercial unit, but I also get some false triggers with it. I am using the ESP12F. Does anyone know any other sensors with s similar form factor than are more reliable?

Has anybody found a way to make real use of this sensor? I would like to put it in a comercial unit, but I also get some false triggers with it. I am using the ESP12F. Does anyone know any other sensors with s similar form factor than are more reliable?

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syedamerali Nov 4, 2017

Have had the same problems. Resolved them by doing the following:

  1. Have the DC power feed to the ESP as close as possible to the ESP.
  2. Put a 2000uF capacitor as close as possible to the power input of the RCWL.
    The pi filter mentioned above is not necessary but the single capacitors to smooth out ripples to RCWL
    is.
  3. Put a 10k resistor between output of the RCWL and ground.

I also tried the following at the suggestion of others for the ESP:
WiFi.setPhyMode(WIFI_PHY_MODE_11G); // puts ESP in G mode only
WiFi.setOutputPower(8) ; // limits output power to 8/4=2 dbM
WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA); // not quite sure what this does
I do not know whether these have an effect or not.
The second line where you limit the power certainly does. This may be due to the fact that when the ESP goes into transmit mode it draws power which causes a slight ripple in the power line which is sufficient to trigger the RCWL. The capacitor accross the power line near the RCWL mitigate this effect.
Hope this helps someone .....

Have had the same problems. Resolved them by doing the following:

  1. Have the DC power feed to the ESP as close as possible to the ESP.
  2. Put a 2000uF capacitor as close as possible to the power input of the RCWL.
    The pi filter mentioned above is not necessary but the single capacitors to smooth out ripples to RCWL
    is.
  3. Put a 10k resistor between output of the RCWL and ground.

I also tried the following at the suggestion of others for the ESP:
WiFi.setPhyMode(WIFI_PHY_MODE_11G); // puts ESP in G mode only
WiFi.setOutputPower(8) ; // limits output power to 8/4=2 dbM
WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA); // not quite sure what this does
I do not know whether these have an effect or not.
The second line where you limit the power certainly does. This may be due to the fact that when the ESP goes into transmit mode it draws power which causes a slight ripple in the power line which is sufficient to trigger the RCWL. The capacitor accross the power line near the RCWL mitigate this effect.
Hope this helps someone .....

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ym58 Nov 5, 2017

@syedamerali
Happy you solved the problem by using the three steps you mentioned (plus the software tweaking).
Will definitely give it a try.
One question though : you mentioned that the DC power should be placed as close as possible to the ESP, but what about the RCWL ?
Where did you actually place it in regards to the P/S and the ESP to be able to eliminate the false triggers ?

ym58 commented Nov 5, 2017

@syedamerali
Happy you solved the problem by using the three steps you mentioned (plus the software tweaking).
Will definitely give it a try.
One question though : you mentioned that the DC power should be placed as close as possible to the ESP, but what about the RCWL ?
Where did you actually place it in regards to the P/S and the ESP to be able to eliminate the false triggers ?

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syedamerali Nov 5, 2017

Actually the software tweaking does not make the slightest difference. Last night I ran it without the software tweaks but the capacitor in place - no false triggers. Therefore I would assume that there is very little significance to the statement that the 2.4 GHz of the WiFi interferes with the RCWL microwave frequency.
I monitor the triggers through Homeseer HS3 with a Device History plugin which records each trigger with a date and time stamp and can display it graphically also - HS3 is control software that I use for controlling my home mostly z-wave.
I have my ESP8266 mounted on a small custom board (which I designed and made myself) which has an onboard 3.3V regulator and I/O level shifters. This is fed by a 5V DC supply which is also feeding the RCWL - hence the statement 'closest to the ESP'.
The ESP and the RCWL are about 50mm apart.
I will try and post some pictures of my setup later today - like they say a picture is worth a thousand words. .....
regards

Actually the software tweaking does not make the slightest difference. Last night I ran it without the software tweaks but the capacitor in place - no false triggers. Therefore I would assume that there is very little significance to the statement that the 2.4 GHz of the WiFi interferes with the RCWL microwave frequency.
I monitor the triggers through Homeseer HS3 with a Device History plugin which records each trigger with a date and time stamp and can display it graphically also - HS3 is control software that I use for controlling my home mostly z-wave.
I have my ESP8266 mounted on a small custom board (which I designed and made myself) which has an onboard 3.3V regulator and I/O level shifters. This is fed by a 5V DC supply which is also feeding the RCWL - hence the statement 'closest to the ESP'.
The ESP and the RCWL are about 50mm apart.
I will try and post some pictures of my setup later today - like they say a picture is worth a thousand words. .....
regards

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ym58 Nov 10, 2017

@syedamerali
Any pictures of the working assembly ?

ym58 commented Nov 10, 2017

@syedamerali
Any pictures of the working assembly ?

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syedamerali Nov 10, 2017

images are attached. (I think) I have also ordered a PCB with a ground plane let us see how that goes.
rcwl1
ep8266-1

images are attached. (I think) I have also ordered a PCB with a ground plane let us see how that goes.
rcwl1
ep8266-1

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ym58 Nov 10, 2017

Thanks !
How is the +5VDC P/S supplied ?
Via a battery or directly from the 220V AC via an AC/DC step down converter ?
What's the role of the 3.300uF that can be seen in the background ?
I'll try to stick as much as possible to such a layout and will post my results !

ym58 commented Nov 10, 2017

Thanks !
How is the +5VDC P/S supplied ?
Via a battery or directly from the 220V AC via an AC/DC step down converter ?
What's the role of the 3.300uF that can be seen in the background ?
I'll try to stick as much as possible to such a layout and will post my results !

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syedamerali Nov 10, 2017

Some more pictures:
Graph of triggers for the last 24 hours - it is consistent with the activity in my living room.
The board I have designed and ordered - should be with me in a week or so.
rcwltrigger

rcwlboard

Some more pictures:
Graph of triggers for the last 24 hours - it is consistent with the activity in my living room.
The board I have designed and ordered - should be with me in a week or so.
rcwltrigger

rcwlboard

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syedamerali Nov 10, 2017

To answer your questions:

  1. Power is supplied from a 2A 5V plugin adapter which is plugged into the wall and is away from the box which houses the motion detector. Initially, I had it inside the same box as the RCWL and ESP8266 - there were a lot of false triggers. I am not quite sure whether it was the lack of capacitance near the RCWL or whether the power supply itself was generating noise. It was one of these cheap switching power supplies which I got for a dollar off ebay.
  2. The capacitor in the background has been put across the 5V input. It seemed like the right thing to do - but this capacitor did not prevent false triggers. The one near the RCWL board did.
  3. The 10k resistor between the output of the RCWL and ground does make a difference.
  4. The 1k resistor is in series with a blue LED which flashes when there is motion. It is driven by the software in the ESP8266 through GPIO 0.
    hope this helps.
    regards

To answer your questions:

  1. Power is supplied from a 2A 5V plugin adapter which is plugged into the wall and is away from the box which houses the motion detector. Initially, I had it inside the same box as the RCWL and ESP8266 - there were a lot of false triggers. I am not quite sure whether it was the lack of capacitance near the RCWL or whether the power supply itself was generating noise. It was one of these cheap switching power supplies which I got for a dollar off ebay.
  2. The capacitor in the background has been put across the 5V input. It seemed like the right thing to do - but this capacitor did not prevent false triggers. The one near the RCWL board did.
  3. The 10k resistor between the output of the RCWL and ground does make a difference.
  4. The 1k resistor is in series with a blue LED which flashes when there is motion. It is driven by the software in the ESP8266 through GPIO 0.
    hope this helps.
    regards
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ym58 Nov 10, 2017

syedamerali wrote :
Power is supplied from a 2A 5V plugin adapter which is plugged into the wall and is away from the box which houses the motion detector. Initially, I had it inside the same box as the RCWL and ESP8266 - there were a lot of false triggers. I am not quite sure whether it was the lack of capacitance near the RCWL or whether the power supply itself was generating noise. It was one of these cheap switching power supplies which I got for a dollar off ebay.

Here we go ... indeed, that's certainly what I should start with ... that is to get the P/S OUT OF the assembly !

radar_sensor_rcwl-0516

ym58 commented Nov 10, 2017

syedamerali wrote :
Power is supplied from a 2A 5V plugin adapter which is plugged into the wall and is away from the box which houses the motion detector. Initially, I had it inside the same box as the RCWL and ESP8266 - there were a lot of false triggers. I am not quite sure whether it was the lack of capacitance near the RCWL or whether the power supply itself was generating noise. It was one of these cheap switching power supplies which I got for a dollar off ebay.

Here we go ... indeed, that's certainly what I should start with ... that is to get the P/S OUT OF the assembly !

radar_sensor_rcwl-0516

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barewires Nov 10, 2017

As you say...1000 words, it certainly helps! The 'active' portion is pointing up, which is good. I am concerned about the mass of metal below the cat detector, power supply, cap and transformer; how about rotating the PS, cut off the central plastic web and get the PS well away. As the OUT is digital 3.3 v high, I wonder why you need the pull-down resistor?

I found that the OUT is current limited and you can hang ANY LED without a dropping resistor, which may be useful. I would scope the DC supply and see if there is much ripple. A low value cap may be needed on the RCWL power in. Also the mass of metal on the big cap is so close to the circular capacitor trace, may be best to put it outside the active area, if at all. Great photos! The concentric circles form the C and the serpentine trace on the top is the inductor L, forming an LC tank circuit oscillator. This is the primary oscillator and all metal should be kept well away. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LC_circuit

I assume that the ESP is 3.3 volt compatible so I question the need for the logic level converter? It may be best to twist all power wires together, even though they are short.

The RCWL has the 3V3 voltage regulator output so it might be tried to power it with 5 v and use the 3V3 OUTPUT to power other circuitry under 100 mA.

Another thought is to power the whole thing with a mini or micro USB power supply and get rid of the cheap AC PS, remember you get what you pay for. :D

Sorry if I TL;DR, I often (always) view the images and comment and now see others have concerns over the metal mass of the PS.

barewires commented Nov 10, 2017

As you say...1000 words, it certainly helps! The 'active' portion is pointing up, which is good. I am concerned about the mass of metal below the cat detector, power supply, cap and transformer; how about rotating the PS, cut off the central plastic web and get the PS well away. As the OUT is digital 3.3 v high, I wonder why you need the pull-down resistor?

I found that the OUT is current limited and you can hang ANY LED without a dropping resistor, which may be useful. I would scope the DC supply and see if there is much ripple. A low value cap may be needed on the RCWL power in. Also the mass of metal on the big cap is so close to the circular capacitor trace, may be best to put it outside the active area, if at all. Great photos! The concentric circles form the C and the serpentine trace on the top is the inductor L, forming an LC tank circuit oscillator. This is the primary oscillator and all metal should be kept well away. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LC_circuit

I assume that the ESP is 3.3 volt compatible so I question the need for the logic level converter? It may be best to twist all power wires together, even though they are short.

The RCWL has the 3V3 voltage regulator output so it might be tried to power it with 5 v and use the 3V3 OUTPUT to power other circuitry under 100 mA.

Another thought is to power the whole thing with a mini or micro USB power supply and get rid of the cheap AC PS, remember you get what you pay for. :D

Sorry if I TL;DR, I often (always) view the images and comment and now see others have concerns over the metal mass of the PS.

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20171110_213836

This is my Cat Detector, a Raspberry Pi Zero W (for WiFI) sitting in a box near my front door, sees my neighbour and even me in my kitchen 2 rooms away grr! Any activity outside my door, cleaners, post (mail), visitors, neighbours cat; gets logged to a time and date file and it also tweets me and emails. Node-RED comes with the latest Rasbian.

pi@pi0-whitebox:~ $ ls -l -t *
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 25458 Nov 10 21:40 whiteboxNov10
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 11600 Nov 10 21:40 whiteboxdelayNov10

pi@pi0-whitebox:~ $ cat whiteboxNov10
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:38:35 GMT+0000 (GMT)
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:38:53 GMT+0000 (GMT)
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:39:50 GMT+0000 (GMT)

20171110_213836

This is my Cat Detector, a Raspberry Pi Zero W (for WiFI) sitting in a box near my front door, sees my neighbour and even me in my kitchen 2 rooms away grr! Any activity outside my door, cleaners, post (mail), visitors, neighbours cat; gets logged to a time and date file and it also tweets me and emails. Node-RED comes with the latest Rasbian.

pi@pi0-whitebox:~ $ ls -l -t *
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 25458 Nov 10 21:40 whiteboxNov10
-rw-r--r-- 1 pi pi 11600 Nov 10 21:40 whiteboxdelayNov10

pi@pi0-whitebox:~ $ cat whiteboxNov10
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:38:35 GMT+0000 (GMT)
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:38:53 GMT+0000 (GMT)
Fri Nov 10 2017 21:39:50 GMT+0000 (GMT)

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barewires Nov 10, 2017

20170831_103048
This is CAT5 chewing my wiring from the Cat Detector. The detector is powered by a 5v USB plug (red) and the RCWL is green. The 3.3 v Blue LED is directly wired to OUT and GND with no dropping resistor (current limited) and the output goes into the Raspberry Pi 3 GPIO. Notice only one wire attached as power and ground comes from the USB plug.

barewires commented Nov 10, 2017

20170831_103048
This is CAT5 chewing my wiring from the Cat Detector. The detector is powered by a 5v USB plug (red) and the RCWL is green. The 3.3 v Blue LED is directly wired to OUT and GND with no dropping resistor (current limited) and the output goes into the Raspberry Pi 3 GPIO. Notice only one wire attached as power and ground comes from the USB plug.

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barewires Nov 10, 2017

2017-11-10-222113_1366x768_scrot
This is node-RED running in the whitebox. The Pi Zero W is headless so I remotely log in with 192.168.1.18:1880 from any tablet or desktop browser and edit the node-RED gui. Log files can be viewed by secure shell in any terminal, phone or tablet - ssh pi@192.168.1.18

The date function is the most complex part of the system. This converts UNIX time in milliseconds to local time.

var date = new Date(msg.payload);
msg.payload = new Date().toString();
return msg;

Any on/off activity is logged locally and emailed once only every 5 minutes. Twits are done the same way. Raw sensor activity produces so much data that it has to be filtered.

barewires commented Nov 10, 2017

2017-11-10-222113_1366x768_scrot
This is node-RED running in the whitebox. The Pi Zero W is headless so I remotely log in with 192.168.1.18:1880 from any tablet or desktop browser and edit the node-RED gui. Log files can be viewed by secure shell in any terminal, phone or tablet - ssh pi@192.168.1.18

The date function is the most complex part of the system. This converts UNIX time in milliseconds to local time.

var date = new Date(msg.payload);
msg.payload = new Date().toString();
return msg;

Any on/off activity is logged locally and emailed once only every 5 minutes. Twits are done the same way. Raw sensor activity produces so much data that it has to be filtered.

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syedamerali Nov 11, 2017

barewires
thank you for your input.
"Also the mass of metal on the big cap is so close to the circular capacitor trace, may be best to put it outside the active area, if at all" valid point - I will lay it down flat on the board that might be better. Actually I tried something else. With a view to making the RCWL directional I put some sticky non conductive tape on the back (circular side) of the board - then I put some aluminium foil on top of that. The detector output was constantly high. So much for that!!
"I assume that the ESP is 3.3 volt compatible so I question the need for the logic level converter? It may be best to twist all power wires together, even though they are short." Right again. The RCWL needs 5V so you need to have a 5V supply. The 3.3V output from the RCWL board is not sufficient to run an ESP8266 so you would need to have a 3.3V supply for the ESP8266 also. I originally made this adaptor board board to interface with an arduino (5V) for its numerous AtoD inputs. This ESP adaptor board communicates with the arduino through the Rx Tx lines. I had this board lying around so I just used it.
"Another thought is to power the whole thing with a mini or micro USB power supply and get rid of the cheap AC PS, remember you get what you pay for. :D". Excellent idea - never thought of it. All I need to do is find an easily usable female micro USB plug which mounts on the side of a plastic box with preferably a round hole.

barewires
thank you for your input.
"Also the mass of metal on the big cap is so close to the circular capacitor trace, may be best to put it outside the active area, if at all" valid point - I will lay it down flat on the board that might be better. Actually I tried something else. With a view to making the RCWL directional I put some sticky non conductive tape on the back (circular side) of the board - then I put some aluminium foil on top of that. The detector output was constantly high. So much for that!!
"I assume that the ESP is 3.3 volt compatible so I question the need for the logic level converter? It may be best to twist all power wires together, even though they are short." Right again. The RCWL needs 5V so you need to have a 5V supply. The 3.3V output from the RCWL board is not sufficient to run an ESP8266 so you would need to have a 3.3V supply for the ESP8266 also. I originally made this adaptor board board to interface with an arduino (5V) for its numerous AtoD inputs. This ESP adaptor board communicates with the arduino through the Rx Tx lines. I had this board lying around so I just used it.
"Another thought is to power the whole thing with a mini or micro USB power supply and get rid of the cheap AC PS, remember you get what you pay for. :D". Excellent idea - never thought of it. All I need to do is find an easily usable female micro USB plug which mounts on the side of a plastic box with preferably a round hole.

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ym58 Nov 11, 2017

I put some sticky non conductive tape on the back (circular side) of the board - then I put some aluminium foil on top of that. The detector output was constantly high.

Do you mean that WITHOUT THIS FOIL the output was constantly high DESPITE your 10K pulldown resistor ?

ym58 commented Nov 11, 2017

I put some sticky non conductive tape on the back (circular side) of the board - then I put some aluminium foil on top of that. The detector output was constantly high.

Do you mean that WITHOUT THIS FOIL the output was constantly high DESPITE your 10K pulldown resistor ?

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syedamerali Nov 11, 2017

The output was high with the foil in place. Once I removed the foil it started functioning normally. The pulldown resistor was in place when I put the foil on.

The output was high with the foil in place. Once I removed the foil it started functioning normally. The pulldown resistor was in place when I put the foil on.

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ym58 Nov 11, 2017

Got you.
I am a bit sick and tired to struggle with the RCWL board to make it work reliably ... have you ever tested the XYC-WB-DC board ?

ym58 commented Nov 11, 2017

Got you.
I am a bit sick and tired to struggle with the RCWL board to make it work reliably ... have you ever tested the XYC-WB-DC board ?

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syedamerali Nov 11, 2017

My RCWL boards are now functioning reliably. I have just received a couple of HFS-DC06 boards which I will try out and let you know in a couple of days. No I have not tested the board you mention.
regards

My RCWL boards are now functioning reliably. I have just received a couple of HFS-DC06 boards which I will try out and let you know in a couple of days. No I have not tested the board you mention.
regards

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barewires Nov 11, 2017

The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard. Now I always put the sensor on a 3 pin Dupont extension of 5 cm and then I can move it to the optimum position.

The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard. Now I always put the sensor on a 3 pin Dupont extension of 5 cm and then I can move it to the optimum position.

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ym58 Nov 11, 2017

@syedamerali
Beautiful design and quite handy to manage connections, although a bit expensive ...
I think I'll give it a try.
It is, in all respects, way better than my long enclosure (see my pic of yesterday) that cannot be operated any longer from an internal 2usd-chinese P/S, anyway !
What's the AWACS-like bump for ?

Have you also seen that one : https://fr.aliexpress.com/item/Hot-sale-9V-DC-24V-DC-360-degree-Microwave-Sensor-Light-Switch-Induction-Microwave-Motion-Sensor/32796897588.html
It looks like it can be operated directly from AC/220V (although it's not quite clear from the AliBaba description if it is DC/9V-24V or AC/220V !)

ym58 commented Nov 11, 2017

@syedamerali
Beautiful design and quite handy to manage connections, although a bit expensive ...
I think I'll give it a try.
It is, in all respects, way better than my long enclosure (see my pic of yesterday) that cannot be operated any longer from an internal 2usd-chinese P/S, anyway !
What's the AWACS-like bump for ?

Have you also seen that one : https://fr.aliexpress.com/item/Hot-sale-9V-DC-24V-DC-360-degree-Microwave-Sensor-Light-Switch-Induction-Microwave-Motion-Sensor/32796897588.html
It looks like it can be operated directly from AC/220V (although it's not quite clear from the AliBaba description if it is DC/9V-24V or AC/220V !)

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ym58 Nov 11, 2017

The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard. Now I always put the sensor on a 3 pin Dupont extension of 5 cm and then I can move it to the optimum position

@barewires
Yes, you must be right as I no longer have false triggers when sensor is under test at the end of Dupont wires and back to the breadboard !
Albeit I am still uncertain if this is due to the Dupont extension or to the rippleless "external" supply (provided here from my PC USB port) ... !
2017-11-11 18 58 47

ym58 commented Nov 11, 2017

The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard. Now I always put the sensor on a 3 pin Dupont extension of 5 cm and then I can move it to the optimum position

@barewires
Yes, you must be right as I no longer have false triggers when sensor is under test at the end of Dupont wires and back to the breadboard !
Albeit I am still uncertain if this is due to the Dupont extension or to the rippleless "external" supply (provided here from my PC USB port) ... !
2017-11-11 18 58 47

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ym58 Nov 13, 2017

@syedamerali
I have read it all (and possibly understood ;-) ... z-wave is quite impressive !
Fibaro looks like an elegant, no headache, low-power solution targeting the streamline home automation consumers.
However, it doesn't give DIY's guys like us a "sense of feeling" ... I guess that tinkering cheap ESP8266's stuff is rewarding.
But should I be able to find also cheap bare z-wave sensors and easily programmable z-wave hubs, I would definitely fancy giving it a try for the battery-powered capability is very enticing.

ym58 commented Nov 13, 2017

@syedamerali
I have read it all (and possibly understood ;-) ... z-wave is quite impressive !
Fibaro looks like an elegant, no headache, low-power solution targeting the streamline home automation consumers.
However, it doesn't give DIY's guys like us a "sense of feeling" ... I guess that tinkering cheap ESP8266's stuff is rewarding.
But should I be able to find also cheap bare z-wave sensors and easily programmable z-wave hubs, I would definitely fancy giving it a try for the battery-powered capability is very enticing.

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syedamerali Nov 13, 2017

Actually there is a much better write up on z-wave on wikipedia.
"Sense of feeling". Each sensor / actor can have upto 200 customisation parameters. You cannot imagine that a simple switch which we use our finger to operate can have so many configurable parameters. Look at the advanced parameters in the attachment. So it definetly gives you a sense of feeling and is most rewarding and you can do so much more.
There are no cheap z-wave sensors. I have tried chinese ones (NEO coolcam) total waste of time.
Actually, it is not a good idea to have a lot of battery powered devices in your z-wave mesh network. Unlike the powered ones they do not act as repeaters. This weakens the mesh network.
Apart from the mesh network the good thing about z-wave devices is:

  1. They are physically so small that you can stick them into existing switch boxes. And in addittion to be operated remotely they can also be operated by the existing manual switches.
  2. Once a command is given to an actor to do something it acknowledges that it has done it. It is only after this acknowledgement that the status changes in your software for that particular actor.

If you are thinking of diving into z-wave, try and stick to z-wave+ certified devices. They are faster, have more range and many more customisable features.

binarySwitchFGS-2x3-EN-T-v1.2.pdf

Actually there is a much better write up on z-wave on wikipedia.
"Sense of feeling". Each sensor / actor can have upto 200 customisation parameters. You cannot imagine that a simple switch which we use our finger to operate can have so many configurable parameters. Look at the advanced parameters in the attachment. So it definetly gives you a sense of feeling and is most rewarding and you can do so much more.
There are no cheap z-wave sensors. I have tried chinese ones (NEO coolcam) total waste of time.
Actually, it is not a good idea to have a lot of battery powered devices in your z-wave mesh network. Unlike the powered ones they do not act as repeaters. This weakens the mesh network.
Apart from the mesh network the good thing about z-wave devices is:

  1. They are physically so small that you can stick them into existing switch boxes. And in addittion to be operated remotely they can also be operated by the existing manual switches.
  2. Once a command is given to an actor to do something it acknowledges that it has done it. It is only after this acknowledgement that the status changes in your software for that particular actor.

If you are thinking of diving into z-wave, try and stick to z-wave+ certified devices. They are faster, have more range and many more customisable features.

binarySwitchFGS-2x3-EN-T-v1.2.pdf

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@syedamerali
I am technically completely convinced ... by your arguments as well as by my readings !
A z-wave+ mesh with a raZpberry hub is definitely something a "native tinker" would like to set up !
If it weren't for the costs of accessing the z-wave+ technology .... :-(
There's quite a difference between a fellow like you owning 50+ z-wave devices for home automation "valid" reasons and a guy like me who just tinkers ... for the beauty of it !

By the way, is this something you salvaged from a Fibaro enclosure ?
tmp

ym58 commented Nov 13, 2017

@syedamerali
I am technically completely convinced ... by your arguments as well as by my readings !
A z-wave+ mesh with a raZpberry hub is definitely something a "native tinker" would like to set up !
If it weren't for the costs of accessing the z-wave+ technology .... :-(
There's quite a difference between a fellow like you owning 50+ z-wave devices for home automation "valid" reasons and a guy like me who just tinkers ... for the beauty of it !

By the way, is this something you salvaged from a Fibaro enclosure ?
tmp

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barewires Nov 13, 2017

I think discussions other than the RCWL-0516 should be moved out of this forum.

I think discussions other than the RCWL-0516 should be moved out of this forum.

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syedamerali Nov 13, 2017

@barewires
Absolutely correct and noted.
particulary after the reprimand!

@barewires
Absolutely correct and noted.
particulary after the reprimand!

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ym58 commented Nov 13, 2017

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cute ......

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syedamerali Nov 14, 2017

Any thoughts on elevated moisture levels in the atmosphere effecting the RCWL triggering?
The reason I ask that it is raining outside RH is at 81% and the false triggers have restarted.

Any thoughts on elevated moisture levels in the atmosphere effecting the RCWL triggering?
The reason I ask that it is raining outside RH is at 81% and the false triggers have restarted.

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ym58 Nov 14, 2017

Watch the end of this video (after the cat) ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HYRD35F570

ym58 commented Nov 14, 2017

Watch the end of this video (after the cat) ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HYRD35F570

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syedamerali Nov 15, 2017

Got my PCB's for the RCWL-0516 yesterday. Have tried one for about 24 hrs and another for about 8hrs.
No false triggers. I now how a repeatable, consistent and economic solution for motion detection.
I can more confidentally state now that layout is critical - all the wires flying around in a hobbyist's prototype give inconsistent results. Further, the pi filter is of no significance only a capacitaence is required near the RCWL board on the power feed.
@barewires comment "The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard." Confining myself to the false triggers part of this comment. My new setup with the PCB the RCWL is parrallel to the ESP and is about 60mm apart. Both the ESP and RCWL are at right angles to a PCB with a ground plane - no false triggers.
I cannot figure out a way to measure sluggish responce - any ideas?
regards
radarpcb

Got my PCB's for the RCWL-0516 yesterday. Have tried one for about 24 hrs and another for about 8hrs.
No false triggers. I now how a repeatable, consistent and economic solution for motion detection.
I can more confidentally state now that layout is critical - all the wires flying around in a hobbyist's prototype give inconsistent results. Further, the pi filter is of no significance only a capacitaence is required near the RCWL board on the power feed.
@barewires comment "The only time I had false triggers / sluggish response was when the detector was both flat and perpendicular to a breadboard." Confining myself to the false triggers part of this comment. My new setup with the PCB the RCWL is parrallel to the ESP and is about 60mm apart. Both the ESP and RCWL are at right angles to a PCB with a ground plane - no false triggers.
I cannot figure out a way to measure sluggish responce - any ideas?
regards
radarpcb

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barewires Nov 15, 2017

I use multiple sensors, one packaged in target enclosure, others within 5 cm nearby in the clear and log each activity in the Pi Zero. Also used a 6 pin multifunction logic gate to AND OR the signals to another GPIO. Any variation or non-response T&D activity is easily seen. Also have used a PIR for physical motion detection.

I don't think that the big cap and resistor are necessary. They have never been needed in my circuits. I believe that the ESP IO is 3.3 volts so is compatible with the RCWL-0516, and I still question the need for the logic level converter. The 'ground plane' also bothers me as it appears to be a mass of useless metal.

The ESP is also a modem using the AT command set from 1981...ah the good old days are still with us.

If USB micro power in is not a concern then I would highly recommend a Raspberry Pi Zero W (for WIFI / Bluetooth) headless operation (no HDMI monitor, no KB/Mouse) if needed, node-RED GUI for remote HTML design, monitoring, SSH for remote access. Does an ESP do all of this? For under £10

Anything Arduino related is now so turn-of-the-century.

Raspberry Pi Zero W (Wireless) Details:
BCM2835 (same as Pi 1) but up-clocked to 1GHz, so 40% faster
512MB RAM
Mini HDMI
USB On-The-Go port
Micro USB power
HAT-compatible 40-pin GPIO header
Composite video and reset headers
CSI camera connector
802.11b/g/n Wireless LAN
Bluetooth 4.1
Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)

barewires commented Nov 15, 2017

I use multiple sensors, one packaged in target enclosure, others within 5 cm nearby in the clear and log each activity in the Pi Zero. Also used a 6 pin multifunction logic gate to AND OR the signals to another GPIO. Any variation or non-response T&D activity is easily seen. Also have used a PIR for physical motion detection.

I don't think that the big cap and resistor are necessary. They have never been needed in my circuits. I believe that the ESP IO is 3.3 volts so is compatible with the RCWL-0516, and I still question the need for the logic level converter. The 'ground plane' also bothers me as it appears to be a mass of useless metal.

The ESP is also a modem using the AT command set from 1981...ah the good old days are still with us.

If USB micro power in is not a concern then I would highly recommend a Raspberry Pi Zero W (for WIFI / Bluetooth) headless operation (no HDMI monitor, no KB/Mouse) if needed, node-RED GUI for remote HTML design, monitoring, SSH for remote access. Does an ESP do all of this? For under £10

Anything Arduino related is now so turn-of-the-century.

Raspberry Pi Zero W (Wireless) Details:
BCM2835 (same as Pi 1) but up-clocked to 1GHz, so 40% faster
512MB RAM
Mini HDMI
USB On-The-Go port
Micro USB power
HAT-compatible 40-pin GPIO header
Composite video and reset headers
CSI camera connector
802.11b/g/n Wireless LAN
Bluetooth 4.1
Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)

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ym58 Nov 16, 2017

I think discussions other than the RCWL-0516 should be moved out of this forum.

just kidding ... ;-) ... !!!

ym58 commented Nov 16, 2017

I think discussions other than the RCWL-0516 should be moved out of this forum.

just kidding ... ;-) ... !!!

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barewires Nov 16, 2017

cute ......

barewires commented Nov 16, 2017

cute ......

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jeraymond Nov 19, 2017

Hi. Thanks for all the great info on this thread.

In my setup I have the RCWL close to the ESP8266. They are about 10mm away from each other and are parallel on opposite sides of a PCB.

rcwl-0516 with wemos d1 mini pro esp8266

The ESP is definitely causing interference with the RCWL in my setup. I probed PIN 12 on the RCWL and see the voltage wiggle with movement. Over a certain threshold the RCWL output pin triggers high indicating movement detected. WiFi activity on the ESP also affects the wiggle. Most noticeable for me is on WiFi connect. The interference is large and causes the RCWL to trigger due to the interference. When WiFi is already in a connected state I do not see a much interference. Sending data over WiFi also seems OK.

esp8266 interference with rcwl-0516

I tried some of the WiFi tweaks suggested here and find this helps reduce with the idle wiggle. However this difference wasn't enough to remove the WiFi connect interference. Also the normal wiggle without WiFi setting tweaks weren't strong enough to trigger the RCWL in my setup.

// WiFi tweaks to reduce interference, didn't make much difference for me.
WiFi.setPhyMode(WIFI_PHY_MODE_11G);
WiFi.setOutputPower(8);
WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA);

I assume distancing the RCWL from the ESP reduces interference and looks like has worked for others above in this thread.

@syedamerali I'm curious to know if forcing a WiFi disconnect and reconnect in the code in your setup would cause a false trigger given the distance you have between the ESP and the RCWL. Do you have a scope? I'd also be interested in seeing what the RCWL PIN 12 output looks like for you idle and during WiFi reconnect.

I also experimented with the 2000 uF cap across the RCWL power and ground pins and the 10k resistor from RCWL out to ground. This didn't seem to make any difference in my setup. Perhaps this helps with dodgy power supplies and mine is steady enough. These additional components did not help with the WiFi reconnect interference. I still got false triggering. Probing the power input to the RCWL during the reconnects I saw a constant voltage.

I plan to deal with the false triggers in software. The RCWL seem to pull the output high for about 3 seconds (~2700 millis) after motion has stopped. False triggers I've seen typically show as very brief interference (< 1 second). So I'm ignoring any "motion" less than 2 second in duration (so 5 seconds of the RCWL pin being pulled high). I'm also ignoring triggers when the WiFi is not connected. In my use case I'm sending motion events over WiFi to a server, so if I can't connect to WiFi I'm choosing to ignore the events.

Hi. Thanks for all the great info on this thread.

In my setup I have the RCWL close to the ESP8266. They are about 10mm away from each other and are parallel on opposite sides of a PCB.

rcwl-0516 with wemos d1 mini pro esp8266

The ESP is definitely causing interference with the RCWL in my setup. I probed PIN 12 on the RCWL and see the voltage wiggle with movement. Over a certain threshold the RCWL output pin triggers high indicating movement detected. WiFi activity on the ESP also affects the wiggle. Most noticeable for me is on WiFi connect. The interference is large and causes the RCWL to trigger due to the interference. When WiFi is already in a connected state I do not see a much interference. Sending data over WiFi also seems OK.

esp8266 interference with rcwl-0516

I tried some of the WiFi tweaks suggested here and find this helps reduce with the idle wiggle. However this difference wasn't enough to remove the WiFi connect interference. Also the normal wiggle without WiFi setting tweaks weren't strong enough to trigger the RCWL in my setup.

// WiFi tweaks to reduce interference, didn't make much difference for me.
WiFi.setPhyMode(WIFI_PHY_MODE_11G);
WiFi.setOutputPower(8);
WiFi.mode(WIFI_STA);

I assume distancing the RCWL from the ESP reduces interference and looks like has worked for others above in this thread.

@syedamerali I'm curious to know if forcing a WiFi disconnect and reconnect in the code in your setup would cause a false trigger given the distance you have between the ESP and the RCWL. Do you have a scope? I'd also be interested in seeing what the RCWL PIN 12 output looks like for you idle and during WiFi reconnect.

I also experimented with the 2000 uF cap across the RCWL power and ground pins and the 10k resistor from RCWL out to ground. This didn't seem to make any difference in my setup. Perhaps this helps with dodgy power supplies and mine is steady enough. These additional components did not help with the WiFi reconnect interference. I still got false triggering. Probing the power input to the RCWL during the reconnects I saw a constant voltage.

I plan to deal with the false triggers in software. The RCWL seem to pull the output high for about 3 seconds (~2700 millis) after motion has stopped. False triggers I've seen typically show as very brief interference (< 1 second). So I'm ignoring any "motion" less than 2 second in duration (so 5 seconds of the RCWL pin being pulled high). I'm also ignoring triggers when the WiFi is not connected. In my use case I'm sending motion events over WiFi to a server, so if I can't connect to WiFi I'm choosing to ignore the events.

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syedamerali Nov 19, 2017

@jeraymond Yes I do have a scope but I use it so rarely that I will have to reducate myself how to use particularly the storage and display part, but I will definetly give it a try and will post if I have something.

With respect to the last para in your post. My system for monitoring false triggers is as follows:
RCWL trigger ->ESP->WiFi->Virtual Software switch->Record->display selected periods when required.
This recording system has latency; another limitation is I cannot record in fractions of a second, smallest unit is a second. Although, this system can indicate false triggers it cannot reliably report the length of a trigger. Also in my ESP software No Motion->Motion is ignored for 4 minutes after a motion event. Motion->No motion is allowed as it happens.

With these provisos in place, after reading your post, I looked at my recorded data at the time I was having false triggers (an excerpt is given below). I could not find a single trigger less than 3seconds. Look at the times in the third column.

Generally after using for radar sensors for a couple of weeks now I am arriving at the following conclusions:

  1. Do not use radar sensors inside a house. Placement of the box housing the RCWL and ESP is critical. To give an example I had trouble free operation for a sensor placed on my workbench for over 24 hours. I picked up the box and placed it within one foot of my ceiling (reinforced concrete with steel bars in it) repeated false triggers. Put it on the floor in the cavity under my work bench (where you stick your legs in when sitting) repeated false triggers. Back on the workbench - perfect. I have two radar sensors outside the house in the open - they work flawlessly. Use PIR sensors indoors. PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.
  2. WiFi is too unreliable if you want real security - a mesh network is essential, preferably as far away from the WiFi 2.4 GHz as possible.

14/11/2017 21:00:31 | 14/11/2017 21:00:34 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:55:29 | 14/11/2017 21:00:31 | 00:05:01 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:55:26 | 14/11/2017 20:55:29 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:47:08 | 14/11/2017 20:55:26 | 00:08:17 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:47:05 | 14/11/2017 20:47:08 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:41:14 | 14/11/2017 20:47:05 | 00:05:51 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:41:11 | 14/11/2017 20:41:14 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:35:07 | 14/11/2017 20:41:11 | 00:06:03 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:35:04 | 14/11/2017 20:35:07 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:30:13 | 14/11/2017 20:35:04 | 00:04:51 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:30:10 | 14/11/2017 20:30:13 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:25:20 | 14/11/2017 20:30:10 | 00:04:50 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:25:17 | 14/11/2017 20:25:20 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:20:27 | 14/11/2017 20:25:17 | 00:04:49 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:20:24 | 14/11/2017 20:20:27 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:16:22 | 14/11/2017 20:20:24 | 00:04:02 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:16:19 | 14/11/2017 20:16:22 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:11:22 | 14/11/2017 20:16:19 | 00:04:56 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:11:19 | 14/11/2017 20:11:22 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:06:58 | 14/11/2017 20:11:19 | 00:04:20 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:06:53 | 14/11/2017 20:06:58 | 00:00:05 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:02:47 | 14/11/2017 20:06:53 | 00:04:05 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:02:44 | 14/11/2017 20:02:47 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 19:55:10 | 14/11/2017 20:02:44 | 00:07:33 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 19:55:07 | 14/11/2017 19:55:10 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 19:50:36 | 14/11/2017 19:55:07 | 00:04:31 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion

@jeraymond Yes I do have a scope but I use it so rarely that I will have to reducate myself how to use particularly the storage and display part, but I will definetly give it a try and will post if I have something.

With respect to the last para in your post. My system for monitoring false triggers is as follows:
RCWL trigger ->ESP->WiFi->Virtual Software switch->Record->display selected periods when required.
This recording system has latency; another limitation is I cannot record in fractions of a second, smallest unit is a second. Although, this system can indicate false triggers it cannot reliably report the length of a trigger. Also in my ESP software No Motion->Motion is ignored for 4 minutes after a motion event. Motion->No motion is allowed as it happens.

With these provisos in place, after reading your post, I looked at my recorded data at the time I was having false triggers (an excerpt is given below). I could not find a single trigger less than 3seconds. Look at the times in the third column.

Generally after using for radar sensors for a couple of weeks now I am arriving at the following conclusions:

  1. Do not use radar sensors inside a house. Placement of the box housing the RCWL and ESP is critical. To give an example I had trouble free operation for a sensor placed on my workbench for over 24 hours. I picked up the box and placed it within one foot of my ceiling (reinforced concrete with steel bars in it) repeated false triggers. Put it on the floor in the cavity under my work bench (where you stick your legs in when sitting) repeated false triggers. Back on the workbench - perfect. I have two radar sensors outside the house in the open - they work flawlessly. Use PIR sensors indoors. PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.
  2. WiFi is too unreliable if you want real security - a mesh network is essential, preferably as far away from the WiFi 2.4 GHz as possible.

14/11/2017 21:00:31 | 14/11/2017 21:00:34 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:55:29 | 14/11/2017 21:00:31 | 00:05:01 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:55:26 | 14/11/2017 20:55:29 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:47:08 | 14/11/2017 20:55:26 | 00:08:17 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:47:05 | 14/11/2017 20:47:08 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:41:14 | 14/11/2017 20:47:05 | 00:05:51 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:41:11 | 14/11/2017 20:41:14 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:35:07 | 14/11/2017 20:41:11 | 00:06:03 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:35:04 | 14/11/2017 20:35:07 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:30:13 | 14/11/2017 20:35:04 | 00:04:51 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:30:10 | 14/11/2017 20:30:13 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:25:20 | 14/11/2017 20:30:10 | 00:04:50 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:25:17 | 14/11/2017 20:25:20 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:20:27 | 14/11/2017 20:25:17 | 00:04:49 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:20:24 | 14/11/2017 20:20:27 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:16:22 | 14/11/2017 20:20:24 | 00:04:02 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:16:19 | 14/11/2017 20:16:22 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:11:22 | 14/11/2017 20:16:19 | 00:04:56 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:11:19 | 14/11/2017 20:11:22 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:06:58 | 14/11/2017 20:11:19 | 00:04:20 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:06:53 | 14/11/2017 20:06:58 | 00:00:05 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 20:02:47 | 14/11/2017 20:06:53 | 00:04:05 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 20:02:44 | 14/11/2017 20:02:47 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 19:55:10 | 14/11/2017 20:02:44 | 00:07:33 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion
14/11/2017 19:55:07 | 14/11/2017 19:55:10 | 00:00:03 | Motion | No Motion | -- | No Motion
14/11/2017 19:50:36 | 14/11/2017 19:55:07 | 00:04:31 | No Motion | Motion | -- | Motion

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jeraymond Nov 19, 2017

This recording system has latency; another limitation is I cannot record in fractions of a second, smallest unit is a second

I was measuring the timings directly on the ESP and logging via the serial interface connected to my computer to get a more fine grained measurement.

Do not use radar sensors inside a house. Placement of the box housing the RCWL and ESP is critical. To give an example I had trouble free operation for a sensor placed on my workbench for over 24 hours. I picked up the box and placed it within one foot of my ceiling (reinforced concrete with steel bars in it) repeated false triggers. Put it on the floor in the cavity under my work bench (where you stick your legs in when sitting) repeated false triggers. Back on the workbench - perfect. I have two radar sensors outside the house in the open - they work flawlessly. Use PIR sensors indoors. PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.

I think my strategy to discard any motion event less than 2 seconds (5 seconds of RCWL out pin high) would also discard other forms of short interference similar to what you describe here. I'd be curious if your issues would go away if you did the same. I discard the short events on the ESP so the server never sees them.

PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.

I've noticed this as well. My outdoor PIR motion lights trigger randomly all the time.

WiFi is too unreliable if you want real security - a mesh network is essential, preferably as far away from the WiFi 2.4 GHz as possible.

Thanks for the advice. I'm currently just playing around so the WiFi is good enough but will consider something different for a more serious system.

This recording system has latency; another limitation is I cannot record in fractions of a second, smallest unit is a second

I was measuring the timings directly on the ESP and logging via the serial interface connected to my computer to get a more fine grained measurement.

Do not use radar sensors inside a house. Placement of the box housing the RCWL and ESP is critical. To give an example I had trouble free operation for a sensor placed on my workbench for over 24 hours. I picked up the box and placed it within one foot of my ceiling (reinforced concrete with steel bars in it) repeated false triggers. Put it on the floor in the cavity under my work bench (where you stick your legs in when sitting) repeated false triggers. Back on the workbench - perfect. I have two radar sensors outside the house in the open - they work flawlessly. Use PIR sensors indoors. PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.

I think my strategy to discard any motion event less than 2 seconds (5 seconds of RCWL out pin high) would also discard other forms of short interference similar to what you describe here. I'd be curious if your issues would go away if you did the same. I discard the short events on the ESP so the server never sees them.

PIR sensors outdoors are unreliable.

I've noticed this as well. My outdoor PIR motion lights trigger randomly all the time.

WiFi is too unreliable if you want real security - a mesh network is essential, preferably as far away from the WiFi 2.4 GHz as possible.

Thanks for the advice. I'm currently just playing around so the WiFi is good enough but will consider something different for a more serious system.

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syedamerali Nov 19, 2017

One thing I can confirm - when the RCWL actually registers motion the trigger is always above 3 seconds - it can be as much as 15 seconds.
I was about to code your 2 sec blind time, then I said to myself, what am I doing? All my motion sensors initiate a chain of events in under a second; I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.
This for me is unacceptable and therefore not a solution.

One thing I can confirm - when the RCWL actually registers motion the trigger is always above 3 seconds - it can be as much as 15 seconds.
I was about to code your 2 sec blind time, then I said to myself, what am I doing? All my motion sensors initiate a chain of events in under a second; I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.
This for me is unacceptable and therefore not a solution.

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jeraymond Nov 19, 2017

One thing I can confirm - when the RCWL actually registers motion the trigger is always above 3 seconds - it can be as much as 15 seconds.

Right, it makes sense that all events are at least 3 seconds or more. The RCWL seems to keeps OUT high for a minimum of ~3 seconds after it has detected motion has stopped. You can see this in the wave form I posed earlier. The motion wiggle stops but out says high for a while longer.

I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.
This for me is unacceptable and therefore not a solution.

Fair enough. You stated you stopped using the sensors in locations where you see they get false triggers and interference. In a false trigger free environment waiting to detect false triggers provides no benefit.

I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.

Yea my wait time is about 5 seconds before I register a real event. Since RCWL out stays high for 3 seconds after motion has stopped I need to wait 5 seconds to see if there has been at least 2 seconds of actual motion. If there are downstream time sensitive events that are based on this trigger than 5 seconds may be too much wasted time.

One thing I can confirm - when the RCWL actually registers motion the trigger is always above 3 seconds - it can be as much as 15 seconds.

Right, it makes sense that all events are at least 3 seconds or more. The RCWL seems to keeps OUT high for a minimum of ~3 seconds after it has detected motion has stopped. You can see this in the wave form I posed earlier. The motion wiggle stops but out says high for a while longer.

I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.
This for me is unacceptable and therefore not a solution.

Fair enough. You stated you stopped using the sensors in locations where you see they get false triggers and interference. In a false trigger free environment waiting to detect false triggers provides no benefit.

I will have to wait for 2 sec just to know that motion has taken place and then initiate my dependant events.

Yea my wait time is about 5 seconds before I register a real event. Since RCWL out stays high for 3 seconds after motion has stopped I need to wait 5 seconds to see if there has been at least 2 seconds of actual motion. If there are downstream time sensitive events that are based on this trigger than 5 seconds may be too much wasted time.

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syedamerali Nov 20, 2017

A common situation is that you want the lights to come on in a room once somebody walks into this room. Try doing this with a 3-5 sec delay and see how frustrating this is.

A common situation is that you want the lights to come on in a room once somebody walks into this room. Try doing this with a 3-5 sec delay and see how frustrating this is.

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barewires Nov 20, 2017

All of my sensors trigger OUT logic high immediately on motion, will stay high if motion continues and turn off after a few seconds when motion stops. Are you guys using the falling edge when you should be looking at the leading rising edge.

All of my sensors trigger OUT logic high immediately on motion, will stay high if motion continues and turn off after a few seconds when motion stops. Are you guys using the falling edge when you should be looking at the leading rising edge.

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syedamerali Nov 20, 2017

I am looking at the level - it is not interrupt driven on the leading edge. It is a fairly short loop; code is as under:
void loop(){
bool state = digitalRead(pIN);
if (state) {
digitalWrite(pLED,1);
}
else {
digitalWrite(pLED,0);
}
// determine if ON report to be sent
if (!lastON && state && (millis()-elapsedTime)>updatePeriod){
// updatePeriod=240000 (4min) to stop flooding of the control software with json commands
// send ON URL
lastON=true;
elapsedTime=millis();
sendURL(state);
}
if(lastON && !state ){
// send OFF URL
lastON= false ;
sendURL(state);
}
yield();
}

syedamerali commented Nov 20, 2017

I am looking at the level - it is not interrupt driven on the leading edge. It is a fairly short loop; code is as under:
void loop(){
bool state = digitalRead(pIN);
if (state) {
digitalWrite(pLED,1);
}
else {
digitalWrite(pLED,0);
}
// determine if ON report to be sent
if (!lastON && state && (millis()-elapsedTime)>updatePeriod){
// updatePeriod=240000 (4min) to stop flooding of the control software with json commands
// send ON URL
lastON=true;
elapsedTime=millis();
sendURL(state);
}
if(lastON && !state ){
// send OFF URL
lastON= false ;
sendURL(state);
}
yield();
}

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barewires Nov 20, 2017

Oh! But why read the level when it is digital on/off?

Oh! But why read the level when it is digital on/off?

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syedamerali Nov 20, 2017

My control software triggers actions when there is change in state of a device. Only then can it be classified as an event. If the time is xx - is an event. If the time is between xx and yy - is a condition not an event.

I do not exactly how long the loop takes to execute but it most certainly is not more than a ms. So I am checking the status of the RCWL output continously. The control software is only sent a URL when there is a change in state of the RCWL output pin connected to the ESP input pin ( last state is held in variable lastON) ( lastON && !state ) for No Motion- ( !lastON && state ) for Motion.

Hope this clarifies matters ....
PS
Sorry I use C++ for my microcontrollers, including the ESP - you seem to prefer Python.
Of course I can have an interrupt routine which fires off the leading edge of the RCWL output and sends a URL to the control software but I felt that this would flood the control software with triggers.

My control software triggers actions when there is change in state of a device. Only then can it be classified as an event. If the time is xx - is an event. If the time is between xx and yy - is a condition not an event.

I do not exactly how long the loop takes to execute but it most certainly is not more than a ms. So I am checking the status of the RCWL output continously. The control software is only sent a URL when there is a change in state of the RCWL output pin connected to the ESP input pin ( last state is held in variable lastON) ( lastON && !state ) for No Motion- ( !lastON && state ) for Motion.

Hope this clarifies matters ....
PS
Sorry I use C++ for my microcontrollers, including the ESP - you seem to prefer Python.
Of course I can have an interrupt routine which fires off the leading edge of the RCWL output and sends a URL to the control software but I felt that this would flood the control software with triggers.

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barewires Nov 20, 2017

I prefer Boolean, I am a BIT, either on or off, nothing else.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbBqPkdheFg
Good luck.

barewires commented Nov 20, 2017

I prefer Boolean, I am a BIT, either on or off, nothing else.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbBqPkdheFg
Good luck.

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ortegafernando Jan 9, 2018

Hi everybody, I have implemented the Pi filter (2x 1000uF and 10 ohm). When I connect it to muy power supply I can see spikes as we need to charge the two capacitors. is there any trick to avoid this? It is not harmfull (sure?), but i don't like it. Could we increse the resistance value ?

Regards,

Hi everybody, I have implemented the Pi filter (2x 1000uF and 10 ohm). When I connect it to muy power supply I can see spikes as we need to charge the two capacitors. is there any trick to avoid this? It is not harmfull (sure?), but i don't like it. Could we increse the resistance value ?

Regards,

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phpbbireland Jan 9, 2018

The false triggering is more likely caused by the momentary drop in the supply voltage as the ESP switches to transmits mode. It's pretty easy to determine, just use a battery (or other supply) for the RCWL-0516 and see if it false triggers... You should only need a decent cap across the ESP supply to prevent false triggering, perhaps one on the sensor supply too...

phpbbireland commented Jan 9, 2018

The false triggering is more likely caused by the momentary drop in the supply voltage as the ESP switches to transmits mode. It's pretty easy to determine, just use a battery (or other supply) for the RCWL-0516 and see if it false triggers... You should only need a decent cap across the ESP supply to prevent false triggering, perhaps one on the sensor supply too...

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phpbbireland Jan 28, 2018

Just adding a link video which will explain issues in this topic...
The link I added was being modified so I removed it... will investigate further...
https://youtu.be/wf_msvWv1jk

phpbbireland commented Jan 28, 2018

Just adding a link video which will explain issues in this topic...
The link I added was being modified so I removed it... will investigate further...
https://youtu.be/wf_msvWv1jk

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ym58 Jan 29, 2018

@phpbbireland : apparently, your link gets to a 404

ym58 commented Jan 29, 2018

@phpbbireland : apparently, your link gets to a 404

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gecko9 Jan 29, 2018

In addition to having a clean power supply you need to earth the zero volt line of the power supply. Earthing prevents interferance between modules: transever / radar sensor / arduino greatly adding to stability.

gecko9 commented Jan 29, 2018

In addition to having a clean power supply you need to earth the zero volt line of the power supply. Earthing prevents interferance between modules: transever / radar sensor / arduino greatly adding to stability.

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phpbbireland Feb 9, 2018

The module works perfectly at 3.2 volts (have tested over an extended period down to 3.0 volts)...
I use a LiFePO4 3.2 volt battery for all the testing and no issues so far...

phpbbireland commented Feb 9, 2018

The module works perfectly at 3.2 volts (have tested over an extended period down to 3.0 volts)...
I use a LiFePO4 3.2 volt battery for all the testing and no issues so far...

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andrisdru Feb 27, 2018

Seems that i finally was able to crack mystery with RCWL-0516 false triggers. I tried to make a outdoor lamp with motion sensor. With ESP8266 D1 mini, 100W LED, RCWL-0516 motion sensor, light resistor, aliexpress 700mW power supply and solid state relay. Lamp is connected with WIFI to MQTT server to control light sensity timeouts etc. First i did suggestions here made PI filter, made distance between ESP8266, switched to 11B, but still alot false triggers. Code adjustments for double trigger check not helped. But soultion was also to move WIFI router closer to lamp and false trigger problem dissapeared. I assume that weak WIFI (but still working, also scetch upload via OTA uploaded without problems) may somehow trigger those false alarms.

Dont know yet how it works in different weather conditions, right now here is -15C and clear weather, lets see how it works in rain, snow etc.. but right now for one day motion detector is working perfectly. I still will not trust it for intrusion detection but for lightning it works at least for now very good.

andrisdru commented Feb 27, 2018

Seems that i finally was able to crack mystery with RCWL-0516 false triggers. I tried to make a outdoor lamp with motion sensor. With ESP8266 D1 mini, 100W LED, RCWL-0516 motion sensor, light resistor, aliexpress 700mW power supply and solid state relay. Lamp is connected with WIFI to MQTT server to control light sensity timeouts etc. First i did suggestions here made PI filter, made distance between ESP8266, switched to 11B, but still alot false triggers. Code adjustments for double trigger check not helped. But soultion was also to move WIFI router closer to lamp and false trigger problem dissapeared. I assume that weak WIFI (but still working, also scetch upload via OTA uploaded without problems) may somehow trigger those false alarms.

Dont know yet how it works in different weather conditions, right now here is -15C and clear weather, lets see how it works in rain, snow etc.. but right now for one day motion detector is working perfectly. I still will not trust it for intrusion detection but for lightning it works at least for now very good.

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NeuronTech Mar 1, 2018

What are you using to power the ESP?

What are you using to power the ESP?

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Powering ESP with https://goo.gl/ce39R5

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danstoian Mar 12, 2018

I had the same issue with RCWL-0516 connected to a RPi 3 5V GPIO with 10cm breadboard jumper wires. False readings every 5 minutes. I've fixed the problem with a ferrite bead around the wires (VIN, OUT and GND).

I had the same issue with RCWL-0516 connected to a RPi 3 5V GPIO with 10cm breadboard jumper wires. False readings every 5 minutes. I've fixed the problem with a ferrite bead around the wires (VIN, OUT and GND).

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jeraymond Mar 13, 2018

@danstoian what sort of ferrite beads did you use. Something like these? I imagine even something like the small 3mm ones would be bulky.

@danstoian what sort of ferrite beads did you use. Something like these? I imagine even something like the small 3mm ones would be bulky.

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danstoian Mar 13, 2018

@jeraymond I had one of those you mentioned lying around. It's indeed bulky but fixes the problem. I would have also tried with some shielded wires but had none around.

I do have 433Mhz RX/TX, Z-Wave Stick, external hdd, a dual-band router and a 4 module relay within 1 meter of the PI. No false readings for a week now.

Here is my test rig:
image

@jeraymond I had one of those you mentioned lying around. It's indeed bulky but fixes the problem. I would have also tried with some shielded wires but had none around.

I do have 433Mhz RX/TX, Z-Wave Stick, external hdd, a dual-band router and a 4 module relay within 1 meter of the PI. No false readings for a week now.

Here is my test rig:
image

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jeraymond Mar 13, 2018

Interesting. Do you have any experience with through hole mount ferrite beads? I wonder if something like this would have a similar effect of eliminating the noise.

28c0236-0ew-10_sml

Interesting. Do you have any experience with through hole mount ferrite beads? I wonder if something like this would have a similar effect of eliminating the noise.

28c0236-0ew-10_sml

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barewires Mar 13, 2018

Wikipedia states the following for a Lithium Iron Phosphate LiFePO4 battery.
Cell voltage:
Minimum discharge voltage = 2.5 V
Working voltage = 3.0 ~ 3.3 V
Maximum charge voltage = 3.65 V

Any thoughts on running at out-of-spec voltages way out-of-spec from 3.3 volts being back-fed into the device? 3.2 volts may work but is nominal at best. Maybe a low-cost $0.60 Mini Boost Buck DC Board 1.8-5V to 3.3V is the answer.

I put two cat-detectors in my side window to alert me when my neighbours cat intruded with a Raspberry Pi0W and logically ANDed the signals with node-RED which emailed or tweeted me. The RCWL-0516 is so sensitive that any human mousing or motion on my desk 2 metres away will trigger the thing.

Wikipedia states the following for a Lithium Iron Phosphate LiFePO4 battery.
Cell voltage:
Minimum discharge voltage = 2.5 V
Working voltage = 3.0 ~ 3.3 V
Maximum charge voltage = 3.65 V

Any thoughts on running at out-of-spec voltages way out-of-spec from 3.3 volts being back-fed into the device? 3.2 volts may work but is nominal at best. Maybe a low-cost $0.60 Mini Boost Buck DC Board 1.8-5V to 3.3V is the answer.

I put two cat-detectors in my side window to alert me when my neighbours cat intruded with a Raspberry Pi0W and logically ANDed the signals with node-RED which emailed or tweeted me. The RCWL-0516 is so sensitive that any human mousing or motion on my desk 2 metres away will trigger the thing.

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danstoian Mar 14, 2018

@jeraymond I don't have experience with the through hole mount beads but I see no real difference between the one I have and the one in your picture.

This scenario also works (I didn't have enough time to test it though):
image

danstoian commented Mar 14, 2018

@jeraymond I don't have experience with the through hole mount beads but I see no real difference between the one I have and the one in your picture.

This scenario also works (I didn't have enough time to test it though):
image

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