Sparklines for Go.
Go
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README.md

spark

Sparklines for Go, inspired by holman/spark. Why this deserves 150 stars I will never know.

A quick example:

import (
  "fmt"
  "github.com/joliv/spark"
)

boring_data := []float64{1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8}

sparkline := spark.Line(boring_data)

fmt.Println(sparkline)

> "▁▂▃▄▅▆▇█"

Grab it with go get github.com/joliv/spark.

Now some more interesting examples.

Nats season batting averages at a certain point in their 2014 season:

avgs := []float64{.270, .272, .293, .310, .274, .239, .237, .238, .111}
spark.Line(avgs)

> "▇▇██▇▆▆▆▁"

Not too cool, but it is easy to see where the problem is in this lineup. You'll have to blame the National League's rules though, not Treinen. Anyway, have a look at average monthly highs in Phoenix:

temps := []float64{67, 71, 77, 85, 95, 104, 106, 105, 100, 89, 76, 66}
spark.Line(temps)

> "▁▂▃▄▆███▇▅▃▁"

Doesn't say much without knowing the min and max there (about 65° and 105°—why do people live there, again?) but you can clearly see the seasonal trend.

  • Zach Holman does a great sell too, and this is really just a port of his neat tool. There are some cool examples there.
  • @tv added a main() with arg parsing so you can use it in your terminal. You can find that here.
  • Oh, and if you really want, you can pore over the full docs at godoc.org.

Licensed under GPLv3.