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node-red-contrib-influxdb

Node-RED nodes to write and query data from an InfluxDB time series database.

These nodes support both InfluxDB 1.x and InfluxDb 2.0 databases selected using the Version combo box in the configuration node. See the documentation of the different nodes to understand the options provided by the different versions. Currently the node uses two client libraries.

When version 1.x is selected these nodes use the influxDB 1.x client for node.js, specifically calling the writePoints(), and query() methods. Currently they can only communicate with one influxdb host. These nodes are used for writing and querying data in InfluxDB 1.x to 1.8+.

When version 1.8-flux is selected, the nodes use the influxDB 2.0 API compatibility endpoints available in the InfluxDB 2.0 client libraries for node.js. These nodes are used for writing and querying data with Flux in InfluxDB 1.8+.

When version 2.0 is selected, the nodes make use of the InfluxDB 2.0 client libraries for writing and querying data with Flux in InfluxDB 2.0.

Prerequisites

To run this you'll need access to an InfluxDB database version 1.x, 1.8+ or 2.0. See the InfluxDB site for more information. The latest release of this node has been tested with InfluxDB 1.8 and 2.0. This node supports Node.js 10.x, 12.x and 14.x LTS releases. It does not support Node.js 8.x. This node does not support Node-RED before version 1.0.

Install

You can use the Node-RED Manage Palette feature, or run the following command in the root directory of your Node-RED install. Usually this is ~/.node-red .

npm install node-red-contrib-influxdb

Usage

Nodes to write and query data from an influxdb time series database. Supports InfluxDb versions 1.x to 2.0.

Input Node

Queries one or more measurements in an influxdb database. The query is specified in the node configuration or in the msg.query property. Setting it in the node will override the msg.query. The result is returned in msg.payload.

With a v1.x InfluxDb configuration, use the InfluxQL query syntax. With a v1.8-Flux or 2.0 configuration, use the Flux query syntax.

For example, here is a simple flow to query all of the points in the test measurement of the test database. The query is in the configuration of the influxdb input node (copy and paste to your Node-RED editor). We are using a v1.x InfluxDb here, so an InfluxQL query is used.

[{"id":"39aa2ca9.804da4","type":"debug","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","active":true,"tosidebar":true,"console":false,"tostatus":false,"complete":"false","x":530,"y":100,"wires":[]},{"id":"262a3923.e7b216","type":"influxdb in","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"eeb221fb.ab27f","name":"","query":"SELECT * from test","rawOutput":false,"precision":"","retentionPolicy":"","org":"my-org","x":310,"y":100,"wires":[["39aa2ca9.804da4"]]},{"id":"803d82f.ff80f8","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"onceDelay":0.1,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":100,"y":100,"wires":[["262a3923.e7b216"]]},{"id":"eeb221fb.ab27f","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"test","name":"test","usetls":true,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"1.x","url":"http://localhost:8086","rejectUnauthorized":true},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

In this example, we query the same database for all points from a day ago using a 1.8-flux configuration using the Flux query language:

[{"id":"dd32f825.863798","type":"influxdb in","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","name":"","query":"from(bucket: \"test/autogen\") |> range(start: -1d, stop: now())","rawOutput":false,"precision":"","retentionPolicy":"","org":"my-org","x":410,"y":220,"wires":[["17314806.c732c8"]]},{"id":"17314806.c732c8","type":"debug","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","active":true,"tosidebar":true,"console":false,"tostatus":false,"complete":"false","x":670,"y":280,"wires":[]},{"id":"eadef241.cf6fd","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"onceDelay":0.1,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":100,"y":160,"wires":[["dd32f825.863798"]]},{"id":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"database","name":"test 1.8 flux","usetls":false,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"1.8-flux","url":"https://localhost:8086","rejectUnauthorized":false},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

This flow performs the same, but using the msg.query property:

[{"id":"2d5d7690.e5e77a","type":"influxdb in","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","name":"","query":"","rawOutput":false,"precision":"","retentionPolicy":"","org":"my-org","x":300,"y":380,"wires":[["6ab91739.fa71b8"]]},{"id":"6ab91739.fa71b8","type":"debug","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","active":true,"tosidebar":true,"console":false,"tostatus":false,"complete":"false","x":490,"y":380,"wires":[]},{"id":"daff744d.5538c8","type":"function","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"set query","func":"msg.query = 'from(bucket: \"test/autogen\") |> range(start: -1d, stop: now())'\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"initialize":"","finalize":"","x":240,"y":300,"wires":[["2d5d7690.e5e77a"]]},{"id":"3e65472c.652658","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","props":[{"p":"payload"}],"repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"onceDelay":0.1,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":100,"y":300,"wires":[["daff744d.5538c8"]]},{"id":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"database","name":"test 1.8 flux","usetls":false,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"1.8-flux","url":"https://localhost:8086","rejectUnauthorized":false},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node in this flow sets the msg.query property as follows:

msg.query = 'from(bucket: "test/autogen") |> range(start: -1d, stop: now())'
return msg;

Output Node

Writes one or more points (fields and tags) to a measurement.

The fields and tags to write are in msg.payload. If the message is a string, number, or boolean, it will be written as a single field to the specified measurement called value.

Note: Javascript numbers are always written as a float. When using the 1.8-flux or 2.0 configuration, you can explicitly write an integer using a number in a string with an 'i' suffix, for example, to write the integer 1234 use the string '1234i'. This is not supported using 1.x configurations; all numbers are written as float values.

For example, the following flow injects a single random field called value into the measurement test in the database test with the current timestamp.

[{"id":"17bd4566.e842bb","type":"influxdb out","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"eeb221fb.ab27f","name":"","measurement":"test","precision":"","retentionPolicy":"","database":"","retentionPolicyV18Flux":"","org":"","bucket":"","x":440,"y":460,"wires":[]},{"id":"be93bfeb.416c4","type":"function","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"single value","func":"msg.payload = Math.random()*10;\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":270,"y":460,"wires":[["17bd4566.e842bb"]]},{"id":"31f9f174.ce060e","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":120,"y":460,"wires":[["be93bfeb.416c4"]]},{"id":"eeb221fb.ab27f","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"test","name":"test","usetls":true,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"1.x","url":"http://localhost:8086","rejectUnauthorized":true},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node consists of the following:

msg.payload = Math.random()*10;
return msg;

If msg.payload is an object containing multiple properties, all of the the fields will be written to the measurement.

For example, the following flow injects four fields, intValue, numValue, randomValue and strValue into the test2 measurement with the current timestamp using a 1.8-Flux configuration.

[{"id":"6849966e.e53528","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":120,"y":520,"wires":[["c8865cec.261cd"]]},{"id":"c8865cec.261cd","type":"function","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"Fields","func":"msg.payload = {\n    intValue: '12i',\n    numValue: 123.0,\n    strValue: \"message\",\n    randomValue: Math.random()*10\n}\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"initialize":"","finalize":"","x":268,"y":520,"wires":[["72bf0ba5.6e63d4"]]},{"id":"72bf0ba5.6e63d4","type":"influxdb out","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","name":"","measurement":"test2","precision":"","retentionPolicy":"","database":"test","precisionV18FluxV20":"ms","retentionPolicyV18Flux":"","org":"","bucket":"","x":458,"y":520,"wires":[]},{"id":"2ff2a476.a6d2ec","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"database","name":"test 1.8 flux","usetls":false,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"1.8-flux","url":"https://localhost:8086","rejectUnauthorized":false},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node in the flow above consists of the following:

msg.payload = {
    intValue: '10i',
    numValue: 123.0,
    strValue: "message",
    randomValue: Math.random()*10
}
return msg;

If msg.payload is an array containing two objects, the first object will be written as the set of named fields, the second is the set of named tags.

For example, the following simple flow uses an InfluxDb 2.0 database and injects four fields as above, along with two tags, tag1 and tag2:

[{"id":"15c79e62.9294c2","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":120,"y":560,"wires":[["a97b005f.7f22e"]]},{"id":"a97b005f.7f22e","type":"function","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"Fields and Tags","func":"msg.payload = [{\n    intValue: '10i',\n    numValue: 12,\n    randomValue: Math.random()*10,\n    strValue: \"message2\"\n},\n{\n    tag1:\"sensor1\",\n    tag2:\"device2\"\n}];\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"initialize":"","finalize":"","x":280,"y":560,"wires":[["a91d522b.9a077"]]},{"id":"a91d522b.9a077","type":"influxdb out","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"5d7e54ca.019d44","name":"","measurement":"test","precision":"ms","retentionPolicy":"","database":"test","precisionV18FluxV20":"ms","retentionPolicyV18Flux":"","org":"my-org","bucket":"test","x":510,"y":560,"wires":[]},{"id":"5d7e54ca.019d44","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"database","name":"","usetls":false,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"2.0","url":"https://localhost:9999","rejectUnauthorized":false},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node consists of the following code:

msg.payload = [{
    intValue: '10i',
    numValue: 12,
    randomValue: Math.random()*10,
    strValue: "message2"
},
{
    tag1:"sensor1",
    tag2:"device2"
}];
return msg;

Finally, if msg.payload is an array of arrays, it will be written as a series of points containing fields and tags.

For example, the following flow injects two points into an InfluxDb 2.0 database with timestamps specified.

[{"id":"a67139c7.15ec68","type":"inject","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","x":120,"y":620,"wires":[["15047e0e.e613f2"]]},{"id":"15047e0e.e613f2","type":"function","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","name":"multiple readings","func":"msg.payload = [\n    [{\n        numValue: 10,\n        randomValue: Math.random()*10,\n        strValue: \"message1\",\n        time: new Date().getTime()-1\n    },\n    {\n        tag1:\"sensor1\",\n        tag2:\"device2\"\n    }],\n    [{\n        numValue: 20,\n        randomValue: Math.random()*10,\n        strValue: \"message2\",\n        time: new Date().getTime()\n    },\n    {\n        tag1:\"sensor1\",\n        tag2:\"device2\"\n    }]\n];\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"initialize":"","finalize":"","x":320,"y":620,"wires":[["8caaee80.33352"]]},{"id":"8caaee80.33352","type":"influxdb out","z":"6256f76b.e596d8","influxdb":"5d7e54ca.019d44","name":"","measurement":"test","precision":"ms","retentionPolicy":"","database":"test","precisionV18FluxV20":"ms","retentionPolicyV18Flux":"","org":"my-org","bucket":"test","x":590,"y":620,"wires":[]},{"id":"5d7e54ca.019d44","type":"influxdb","hostname":"127.0.0.1","port":"8086","protocol":"http","database":"database","name":"","usetls":false,"tls":"d50d0c9f.31e858","influxdbVersion":"2.0","url":"https://localhost:9999","rejectUnauthorized":false},{"id":"d50d0c9f.31e858","type":"tls-config","name":"","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","servername":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node in the above flow looks as follows:

msg.payload = [
    [{
        intValue: '9i',
        numValue: 10,
        randomValue: Math.random()*10,
        strValue: "message1",
        time: new Date().getTime()-1
    },
    {
        tag1:"sensor1",
        tag2:"device2"
    }],
    [{
        intValue: '11i',
        numValue: 20,
        randomValue: Math.random()*10,
        strValue: "message2",
        time: new Date().getTime()
    },
    {
        tag1:"sensor1",
        tag2:"device2"
    }]
];
return msg;

Note how timestamps are specified here - the number of milliseconds since 1 January 1970 00:00:00 UTC. In this case do not forget to set the precision to "ms" in "Time Precision" of the "Influx Out Node". We make sure the timestamps are a different so the first element doesn't get overwritten by the second.

The Batch Output Node

The batch output node (influx batch) sends a list of points together in a batch to InfluxDB in a slightly different format from the output node. Using the batch node you must specify the measurement name to write into as well as a list of tag and field values. Optionally, you can specify the timestamp for the point, defaulting to the current time.

Note: Javascript numbers are always written as a float. As in the output node, when using the 1.8-flux or 2.0 configuration, you can explicitly write an integer using a number in a string with an 'i' suffix, for example, to write the integer 1234 use the string '1234i'. This is not supported using 1.x configurations; all numbers are written as float values.

By default the node will write timestamps using ms precision since that's what JavaScript gives us. if you specify the timestamp as a Date object, we'll convert it to milliseconds.

If you provide a string or number as the timestamp, we'll pass it straight into Influx to parse using the specified precision, or the default precision in nanoseconds if it is left unspecified.

Note that the default precision is nanoseconds, so if you pass in a number such as date.getTime(), and do not specify millisecond precision, your timestamp will be orders of magnitude incorrect.

The following example flow writes two points to two measurements, setting the timestamp to the current date.

[{"id":"4a271a88.499184","type":"function","z":"87205ed6.329bc","name":"multiple measurement points","func":"msg.payload = [\n    {\n        measurement: \"weather_sensor\",\n        fields: {\n            temp: 5.5,\n            light: 678,\n            humidity: 51\n        },\n        tags:{\n            location:\"garden\"\n        },\n        timestamp: new Date()\n    },\n    {\n        measurement: \"alarm_sensor\",\n        fields: {\n            proximity: 999,\n            temp: 19.5\n        },\n        tags:{\n            location:\"home\"\n        },\n        timestamp: new Date()\n    }\n];\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":400,"y":280,"wires":[["748a06bd.675ed8"]]},{"id":"6493a442.1cdcbc","type":"inject","z":"87205ed6.329bc","name":"","topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"x":140,"y":220,"wires":[["4a271a88.499184"]]},{"id":"748a06bd.675ed8","type":"influxdb batch","z":"87205ed6.329bc","influxdb":"6ca8bde.9eb2f44","name":"","x":670,"y":220,"wires":[]},{"id":"6ca8bde.9eb2f44","type":"influxdb","z":"","hostname":"localhost","port":"8086","protocol":"https","database":"new_db","name":"","usetls":true,"tls":"f7f39f4e.896ae"},{"id":"f7f39f4e.896ae","type":"tls-config","z":"","name":"local-tls","cert":"","key":"","ca":"","certname":"","keyname":"","caname":"","verifyservercert":false}]

The function node generates sample points as follows:

msg.payload = [
    {
        measurement: "weather_sensor",
        fields: {
            temp: 5.5,
            light: 678,
            humidity: 51
        },
        tags:{
            location:"garden"
        },
        timestamp: new Date()
    },
    {
        measurement: "alarm_sensor",
        fields: {
            proximity: 999,
            temp: 19.5
        },
        tags:{
            location:"home"
        },
        timestamp: new Date()
    }
];
return msg;

Catching Failed Reads and Writes

Errors in reads and writes can be caught using the node-red catch node as usual. Standard error information is availlable in the default msg.error field; additional information about the underlying error is in the msg.influx_error field. Currently, this includes the HTTP status code returned from the influxdb server. The influx-read node will always throw a 503, whereas the write nodes will include other status codes as detailed in the Influx API documentation.

Support for Complete Node

All of the nodes make the required done() call to support the complete node as described in the related blog post. When an error is logged, catch nodes will receive a message, but an associated complete node will not.