Symbolic execution engine for JavaScript.
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README.md

leena

leena is a symbolic execution engine for JavaScript. It will try to explore all possible branches in a JavaScript function by concretely and symbolically executing it. For the first case, since we need a sort of tracer (an entity able to execute the code), it's enough to use Chrome enabling the Chrome Debugging Protocol. For the second case, we need an SMT-Solver to solve the condition of the branch. Technically, it's enough that the solver supports the SMT2 language, but, for the moment, we provide support for z3 and cvc4.

To do

  • string constraints
  • constraints on switch
  • constraints on objects
  • loop summarization (working on that)

Requirements

As described above, you need an SMT Solver in order to solve the constraints. Possible choices:

Installation

$ npm install
$ node_modules/grunt-cli/bin/grunt

Command line options

$ node bin/leena --help
Usage: bin/leena <config file> [Options]

Commands:
  <config file>  Config file

Options:
  --no-color        Disable colored output.                            [boolean]
  -s, --smt-solver  SMT-Solver to use.                  [string] [default: "z3"]
  -v, --version     Print the version number.                          [boolean]
  -h, --help        Show help                                          [boolean]

Example

In the folder examples/browser/1 you can find an example:

$ tree examples/browser/1
examples/browser/1
├── foo_1.js
├── foo_2.js
├── foo_3.js
├── foo_4.js
├── index.html
└── leena_config.json

In order to test this application, leena requires a configuration file which describes the entire application. For this example, you have this config file:

{
  "browserSync": {
    "watcher": {
      "server": "<YOUR_PATH>/examples/browser/1",
      "port": 4000,
      "ui": {
        "port": 4001
      }
    },
    "webServer": {
      "server": "<YOUR_PATH>/leena/temp/1",
      "port": 4002,
      "ui": {
        "port": 4003
      }
    }
  },
  "chrome": {
    "debuggingProtocol": {
      "hostname": "localhost",
      "port": 9222
    },
    "testerServer": {
      "hostname": "localhost",
      "port": 4004
    }
  },
  "smt-solvers": {
    "z3": "<YOUR_PATH>/z3"
  },
  "files": ["foo_1.js", "foo_2.js", "foo_3.js", "foo_4.js"]
}

If you want to use the same config file, you need to modify the properties:

  • browserSync.Watcher.server, path of the application that you want to test.
  • browserSync.webServer.server, path of the temporany application (you need a temp path since we instrument the code trough istanbul).
  • smt-solvers.z3, path of the SMT solver. You can specify one or more solvers, like:
    {
      "smt-solvers": {
        "z3": "<YOUR_PATH>/z3",
        "cvc4": "<YOUR_PATH>/cvc4"
      }
    }
    In that case we select the solver that you specify with the option -s (default z3).

Before starting the web server, you have to execute Chrome enabling the Chrome Debugging Protocol (check from the script bin/run_chrome_debugging.sh if the path of Chrome is correct):

$ sh bin/run_chrome_debugging.sh

Optionally, you can check if Chrome is running correctly:

$ node build/test/integration/tester/chrome-debugging-protocol.js

You should have:

  ✓ Chrome running correctly (localhost:9222).

At this point, you can execute leena:

$ node bin/leena examples/browser/1/leena_config.json

The server is running, so you can test all the global functions declared inside the files specified in the files property:

$ node build/test/integration/api/browser-example-1/test-example-1.js

The script summarizes the results in an HTML page.

Screencast

The example described above is summarized here.

License

leena is licensed under the GPL-3.0.