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doc: replace uses of `you` and other style nits

Replace uses of the pronouns `you` and `your` throughout
the docs + other minor style nits

PR-URL: #12673
Reviewed-By: Vse Mozhet Byt <vsemozhetbyt@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Benjamin Gruenbaum <benjamingr@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Luigi Pinca <luigipinca@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Colin Ihrig <cjihrig@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Gibson Fahnestock <gibfahn@gmail.com>
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jasnell committed Apr 26, 2017
1 parent f11d4a1 commit 71f22c842bc3f9e04ebf110461c42b07a304f352
Showing with 129 additions and 125 deletions.
  1. +2 −2 doc/api/addons.md
  2. +2 −2 doc/api/child_process.md
  3. +1 −1 doc/api/cli.md
  4. +38 −39 doc/api/cluster.md
  5. +1 −1 doc/api/console.md
  6. +6 −5 doc/api/dgram.md
  7. +5 −5 doc/api/documentation.md
  8. +10 −10 doc/api/domain.md
  9. +30 −26 doc/api/fs.md
  10. +4 −4 doc/api/globals.md
  11. +24 −25 doc/api/modules.md
  12. +4 −3 doc/api/net.md
  13. +2 −2 doc/api/repl.md
@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@ involving knowledge of several components and APIs :
See [Linking to Node.js' own dependencies][] for additional information.

All of the following examples are available for [download][] and may
be used as a starting-point for your own Addon.
be used as the starting-point for an Addon.

## Hello world

@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ Addon module name is `addon`.
Once the source code has been written, it must be compiled into the binary
`addon.node` file. To do so, create a file called `binding.gyp` in the
top-level of the project describing the build configuration of your module
top-level of the project describing the build configuration of the module
using a JSON-like format. This file is used by [node-gyp][] -- a tool written
specifically to compile Node.js Addons.
@@ -808,8 +808,8 @@ The `'error'` event is emitted whenever:
2. The process could not be killed, or
3. Sending a message to the child process failed.

Note that the `'exit'` event may or may not fire after an error has occurred.
If you are listening to both the `'exit'` and `'error'` events, it is important
*Note*: The `'exit'` event may or may not fire after an error has occurred.
When listening to both the `'exit'` and `'error'` events, it is important
to guard against accidentally invoking handler functions multiple times.

See also [`child.kill()`][] and [`child.send()`][].
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
Node.js comes with a variety of CLI options. These options expose built-in
debugging, multiple ways to execute scripts, and other helpful runtime options.

To view this documentation as a manual page in your terminal, run `man node`.
To view this documentation as a manual page in a terminal, run `man node`.


## Synopsis
@@ -6,8 +6,8 @@ A single instance of Node.js runs in a single thread. To take advantage of
multi-core systems the user will sometimes want to launch a cluster of Node.js
processes to handle the load.

The cluster module allows you to easily create child processes that
all share server ports.
The cluster module allows easy creation of child processes that all share
server ports.

```js
const cluster = require('cluster');
@@ -88,27 +88,24 @@ Node.js process and a cluster worker differs:
idea of what the number 7 file descriptor references.
2. `server.listen(handle)` Listening on handles explicitly will cause
the worker to use the supplied handle, rather than talk to the master
process. If the worker already has the handle, then it's presumed
that you know what you are doing.
process.
3. `server.listen(0)` Normally, this will cause servers to listen on a
random port. However, in a cluster, each worker will receive the
same "random" port each time they do `listen(0)`. In essence, the
port is random the first time, but predictable thereafter. If you
want to listen on a unique port, generate a port number based on the
cluster worker ID.
port is random the first time, but predictable thereafter. To listen
on a unique port, generate a port number based on the cluster worker ID.

There is no routing logic in Node.js, or in your program, and no shared
state between the workers. Therefore, it is important to design your
program such that it does not rely too heavily on in-memory data objects
for things like sessions and login.
*Note*: Node.js does not provide routing logic. It is, therefore important to
design an application such that it does not rely too heavily on in-memory data
objects for things like sessions and login.

Because workers are all separate processes, they can be killed or
re-spawned depending on your program's needs, without affecting other
re-spawned depending on a program's needs, without affecting other
workers. As long as there are some workers still alive, the server will
continue to accept connections. If no workers are alive, existing connections
will be dropped and new connections will be refused. Node.js does not
automatically manage the number of workers for you, however. It is your
responsibility to manage the worker pool for your application's needs.
will be dropped and new connections will be refused. Node.js does not
automatically manage the number of workers, however. It is the application's
responsibility to manage the worker pool based on its own needs.



@@ -141,7 +138,7 @@ added: v0.7.3

This event is the same as the one provided by [`child_process.fork()`][].

In a worker you can also use `process.on('error')`.
Within a worker, `process.on('error')` may also be used.

### Event: 'exit'
<!-- YAML
@@ -192,8 +189,9 @@ added: v0.7.0
* `message` {Object}
* `handle` {undefined|Object}

Similar to the `cluster.on('message')` event, but specific to this worker. In a
worker you can also use `process.on('message')`.
Similar to the `cluster.on('message')` event, but specific to this worker.

Within a worker, `process.on('message)` may also be used.

See [`process` event: `'message'`][].

@@ -336,9 +334,9 @@ added: v6.0.0

Set by calling `.kill()` or `.disconnect()`. Until then, it is `undefined`.

The boolean `worker.exitedAfterDisconnect` lets you distinguish between voluntary
and accidental exit, the master may choose not to respawn a worker based on
this value.
The boolean `worker.exitedAfterDisconnect` allows distinguishing between
voluntary and accidental exit, the master may choose not to respawn a worker
based on this value.

```js
cluster.on('exit', (worker, code, signal) => {
@@ -369,9 +367,9 @@ cluster.workers
added: v0.11.14
-->

This function returns `true` if the worker is connected to its master via its IPC
channel, `false` otherwise. A worker is connected to its master after it's been
created. It is disconnected after the `'disconnect'` event is emitted.
This function returns `true` if the worker is connected to its master via its
IPC channel, `false` otherwise. A worker is connected to its master after it
has been created. It is disconnected after the `'disconnect'` event is emitted.

### worker.isDead()
<!-- YAML
@@ -469,7 +467,7 @@ An alias to [`worker.exitedAfterDisconnect`][].

Set by calling `.kill()` or `.disconnect()`. Until then, it is `undefined`.

The boolean `worker.suicide` lets you distinguish between voluntary
The boolean `worker.suicide` is used to distinguish between voluntary
and accidental exit, the master may choose not to respawn a worker based on
this value.

@@ -540,7 +538,7 @@ added: v0.7.0
* `worker` {cluster.Worker}

When a new worker is forked the cluster module will emit a `'fork'` event.
This can be used to log worker activity, and create your own timeout.
This can be used to log worker activity, and create a custom timeout.

```js
const timeouts = [];
@@ -568,13 +566,14 @@ added: v0.7.0
* `worker` {cluster.Worker}
* `address` {Object}

After calling `listen()` from a worker, when the `'listening'` event is emitted on
the server, a `'listening'` event will also be emitted on `cluster` in the master.
After calling `listen()` from a worker, when the `'listening'` event is emitted
on the server a `'listening'` event will also be emitted on `cluster` in the
master.

The event handler is executed with two arguments, the `worker` contains the worker
object and the `address` object contains the following connection properties:
`address`, `port` and `addressType`. This is very useful if the worker is listening
on more than one address.
The event handler is executed with two arguments, the `worker` contains the
worker object and the `address` object contains the following connection
properties: `address`, `port` and `addressType`. This is very useful if the
worker is listening on more than one address.

```js
cluster.on('listening', (worker, address) => {
@@ -610,8 +609,9 @@ See [child_process event: 'message'][].
Before Node.js v6.0, this event emitted only the message and the handle,
but not the worker object, contrary to what the documentation stated.

If you need to support older versions and don't need the worker object,
you can work around the discrepancy by checking the number of arguments:
If support for older versions is required but a worker object is not
required, it is possible to work around the discrepancy by checking the
number of arguments:

```js
cluster.on('message', (worker, message, handle) => {
@@ -713,8 +713,8 @@ added: v0.11.2

The scheduling policy, either `cluster.SCHED_RR` for round-robin or
`cluster.SCHED_NONE` to leave it to the operating system. This is a
global setting and effectively frozen once you spawn the first worker
or call `cluster.setupMaster()`, whatever comes first.
global setting and effectively frozen once either the first worker is spawned,
or `cluster.setupMaster()` is called, whichever comes first.

`SCHED_RR` is the default on all operating systems except Windows.
Windows will change to `SCHED_RR` once libuv is able to effectively
@@ -750,7 +750,7 @@ changes:
After calling `.setupMaster()` (or `.fork()`) this settings object will contain
the settings, including the default values.

This object is not supposed to be changed or set manually, by you.
This object is not intended to be changed or set manually.

## cluster.setupMaster([settings])
<!-- YAML
@@ -850,8 +850,7 @@ eachWorker((worker) => {
});
```

Should you wish to reference a worker over a communication channel, using
the worker's unique id is the easiest way to find the worker.
Using the worker's unique id is the easiest way to locate the worker.

```js
socket.on('data', (id) => {
@@ -257,7 +257,7 @@ added: v0.1.104
* `label` {string}

Starts a timer that can be used to compute the duration of an operation. Timers
are identified by a unique `label`. Use the same `label` when you call
are identified by a unique `label`. Use the same `label` when calling
[`console.timeEnd()`][] to stop the timer and output the elapsed time in
milliseconds to `stdout`. Timer durations are accurate to the sub-millisecond.

@@ -301,9 +301,8 @@ The only way to know for sure that the datagram has been sent is by using a
passed as the first argument to the `callback`. If a `callback` is not given,
the error is emitted as an `'error'` event on the `socket` object.

Offset and length are optional, but if you specify one you would need to
specify the other. Also, they are supported only when the first
argument is a `Buffer` or `Uint8Array`.
Offset and length are optional but both *must* be set if either are used.
They are supported only when the first argument is a `Buffer` or `Uint8Array`.

Example of sending a UDP packet to a random port on `localhost`;

@@ -329,8 +328,10 @@ client.send([buf1, buf2], 41234, (err) => {
});
```

Sending multiple buffers might be faster or slower depending on your
application and operating system: benchmark it. Usually it is faster.
Sending multiple buffers might be faster or slower depending on the
application and operating system. It is important to run benchmarks to
determine the optimal strategy on a case-by-case basis. Generally speaking,
however, sending multiple buffers is faster.

**A Note about UDP datagram size**

@@ -21,18 +21,18 @@ documentation is generated using the `tools/doc/generate.js` program.
The HTML template is located at `doc/template.html`.


If you find an error in this documentation, please [submit an issue][]
If errors are found in this documentation, please [submit an issue][]
or see [the contributing guide][] for directions on how to submit a patch.

## Stability Index

<!--type=misc-->

Throughout the documentation, you will see indications of a section's
stability. The Node.js API is still somewhat changing, and as it
matures, certain parts are more reliable than others. Some are so
Throughout the documentation are indications of a section's
stability. The Node.js API is still somewhat changing, and as it
matures, certain parts are more reliable than others. Some are so
proven, and so relied upon, that they are unlikely to ever change at
all. Others are brand new and experimental, or known to be hazardous
all. Others are brand new and experimental, or known to be hazardous
and in the process of being redesigned.

The stability indices are as follows:
@@ -27,16 +27,16 @@ exit immediately with an error code.

<!-- type=misc -->

Domain error handlers are not a substitute for closing down your
Domain error handlers are not a substitute for closing down a
process when an error occurs.

By the very nature of how [`throw`][] works in JavaScript, there is almost
never any way to safely "pick up where you left off", without leaking
references, or creating some other sort of undefined brittle state.

The safest way to respond to a thrown error is to shut down the
process. Of course, in a normal web server, you might have many
connections open, and it is not reasonable to abruptly shut those down
process. Of course, in a normal web server, there may be many
open connections, and it is not reasonable to abruptly shut those down
because an error was triggered by someone else.

The better approach is to send an error response to the request that
@@ -80,11 +80,11 @@ const cluster = require('cluster');
const PORT = +process.env.PORT || 1337;
if (cluster.isMaster) {
// In real life, you'd probably use more than just 2 workers,
// A more realistic scenario would have more than 2 workers,
// and perhaps not put the master and worker in the same file.
//
// You can also of course get a bit fancier about logging, and
// implement whatever custom logic you need to prevent DoS
// It is also possible to get a bit fancier about logging, and
// implement whatever custom logic is needed to prevent DoS
// attacks and other bad behavior.
//
// See the options in the cluster documentation.
@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ if (cluster.isMaster) {
}
// This part is not important. Just an example routing thing.
// You'd put your fancy application logic here.
// Put fancy application logic here.
function handleRequest(req, res) {
switch (req.url) {
case '/error':
@@ -202,16 +202,16 @@ the active domain at the time of their creation.

Additionally, callbacks passed to lowlevel event loop requests (such as
to fs.open, or other callback-taking methods) will automatically be
bound to the active domain. If they throw, then the domain will catch
bound to the active domain. If they throw, then the domain will catch
the error.

In order to prevent excessive memory usage, Domain objects themselves
are not implicitly added as children of the active domain. If they
were, then it would be too easy to prevent request and response objects
from being properly garbage collected.

If you *want* to nest Domain objects as children of a parent Domain,
then you must explicitly add them.
To nest Domain objects as children of a parent Domain they must be explicitly
added.

Implicit binding routes thrown errors and `'error'` events to the
Domain's `'error'` event, but does not register the EventEmitter on the

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