Skip to content
Generate queries from graphql schema, used for writing api test.
JavaScript
Branch: master
Clone or download

Latest commit

Fetching latest commit…
Cannot retrieve the latest commit at this time.

Files

Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
.github Update FUNDING.yml Jul 25, 2019
example Feature Exclude Deprecated Fields (#18) Apr 29, 2019
test Feature Exclude Deprecated Fields (#18) Apr 29, 2019
.editorconfig format Oct 19, 2018
.eslintrc fix eslint error and update npm version Feb 23, 2019
.gitignore Feature Exclude Deprecated Fields (#18) Apr 29, 2019
LICENSE Initial commit Mar 26, 2018
README.md Feature Exclude Deprecated Fields (#18) Apr 29, 2019
index.js Allow unicode emojis as comments in schema (#23) Jul 4, 2019
package-lock.json Add fields params and union type support(#10) Jan 18, 2019
package.json update npm version Jul 4, 2019

README.md

gql-generator

Generate queries from graphql schema, used for writing api test.

Example

# Sample schema
type Query {
  user(id: Int!): User!
}

type User {
  id: Int!
  username: String!
  email: String!
  createdAt: String!
}
# Sample query generated
query user($id: Int!) {
  user(id: $id){
    id
    username
    email
    createdAt
  }
}

Usage

# Install
npm install gql-generator -g

# see the usage
gqlg --help

# Generate sample queries from schema file
gqlg --schemaFilePath ./example/sampleTypeDef.graphql --destDirPath ./example/output --depthLimit 5

Now the queries generated from the sampleTypeDef.graphql can be found in the destDir: ./example/output.

This tool generate 3 folders holding the queries: mutations, queries and subscriptions. And also index.js files to export the queries in each folder.

You can require the queries like this:

// require all the queries
const queries = require('./example/output');
// require mutations only
const mutations = require('./example/output/mutations');

// sample content
console.log(queries.mutations.signup);
console.log(mutations.signup);
/*
mutation signup($username: String!, email: String!, password: String!){
  signup(username: $username, email: $email, password: $password){
    token
    user {
      id
      username
      email
      createdAt
    }
  }
}
*/

The tool will automatically exclude any @deprecated schema fields (see more on schema directives here). To change this behavior to include deprecated fields you can use the includeDeprecatedFields flag when running the tool, e.g. gqlg --includeDeprecatedFields.

Usage example

Say you have a graphql schema like this:

type Mutation {
  signup(
    email: String!
    username: String!
    password: String!
  ): UserToken!
}

type UserToken {
  token: String!
  user: User!
}

type User {
  id: Int!
  username: String!
  email: String!
  createdAt: String!
}

Before this tool, you write graphql api test like this:

const { GraphQLClient } = require('graphql-request');
require('should');

const host = 'http://localhost:8080/graphql';

test('signup', async () => {
  const gql = new GraphQLClient(host);
  const query = `mutation signup($username: String!, email: String!, password: String!){
    signup(username: $username, email: $email, password: $password){
      token
      user {
        id
        username
        email
        createdAt
      }
    }
  }`;

  const data = await gql.request(query, {
    username: 'tim',
    email: 'timqian92@qq.com',
    password: 'samplepass',
  });

  (typeof data.signup.token).should.equal('string');
);

As gqlg generated the queries for you, you don't need to write the query yourself, so your test will becomes:

const { GraphQLClient } = require('graphql-request');
require('should');
const mutations = require('./example/output/mutations');

const host = 'http://localhost:8080/graphql';

test('signup', async () => {
  const gql = new GraphQLClient(host);

  const data = await gql.request(mutations.signup, {
    username: 'tim',
    email: 'timqian92@qq.com',
    password: 'samplepass',
  });

  (typeof data.signup.token).should.equal('string');
);

Notes

  • As this tool is used for tests, it expands all of the fields in a query. There might be recursive fields in the query, so gqlg ignores the types which have been added in the parent queries already.
  • Variable names are derived from argument names, so variables generated from multiple occurrences of the same argument name must be deduped. An index is appended to any duplicates e.g. region(language: $language1).

Donate with bitcoin

You can’t perform that action at this time.