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README.md

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coo: schedule Twitter updates with easy

PyPI version Build Status codecov Docs License

Coo is an easy to use Python library for scheduling Twitter updates. To use it, you need to first apply for a developer account in the Twitter Developers Platform and generate the Keys and Access Tokens.

pip install coo

Initializing

from coo import Coo

at = Coo(
    "consumer_key",
    "consumer_secret",
    "access_token",
    "access_token_secret",
    preview=False
)

Alternatively, you can set preview=True and print your tweets in the terminal instead to post them on Twitter.

Scheduling Twitter updates:

from coo import Coo

at = Coo(
    "consumer_key",
    "consumer_secret",
    "access_token",
    "access_token_secret"
)

tweets = [
    ("2030-10-28 18:50", template, "My Twitter update with a template."),
    ("2030-10-29 18:15", template2, "Update with a different template."),
    ("2030-11-01 13:45", None, "Awesome Twitter update without a template."),
]

at.schedule(tweets, time_zone="America/Santiago")

Or you can use a list of strings and add a delay, interval and a template:

tweets = [
    "My first awesome Twitter Update",
    "My second awesome Twitter Update",
    "My third awesome Twitter Update",
    "My fourth awesome Twitter Update",
    "My fifth awesome Twitter Update",
    "My sixth awesome Twitter Update",
]

at.tweet(tweets, delay="13:45", interval="four_hours", template=my_template)

For more detailed options and usage, keep reading or check the documentation 📘.

Scheduling Twitter Updates

Schedule updates with datetime strings or integers and use custom templates if needed.

Coo.schedule(updates, time_zone, media)

Full example:

from coo import Coo

at = Coo(
    "consumer_key",
    "consumer_secret",
    "access_token",
    "access_token_secret"
)

tweets = [
    # datetime with and without templates
    ("2030-10-28 18:50", template, "My Twitter update with a template."),
    ("2030-10-29 18:15", template2, "Update with a different template."),
    ("2030-11-01 13:45", None, "Awesome Twitter update without a template."),

    # date with and without templates
    ("2030-12-25", template3, "Merry christmas!"),
    ("2031-01-01", None, "And a happy new year!"),

    # time with and without templates
    ("18:46", template2, "Will be post today at 18:46."),
    ("23:00", None, "A tweet for today at 23:00."),

    # integer (seconds) with and without templates
    (3600, template, "This tweet will be posted in an hour."),
    (86400, None, "This one, tomorrow at the same hour."),
]

at.schedule(tweets, time_zone="America/Santiago")

Notes for parsing DateTime strings

  • If a time zone is not specified, it will set to local.
  • The time will be set to 00:00:00 if it's not specified.
  • When passing only time information the date will default to today.
  • A future date is needed, otherwise a ScheduleError is raised.

Here you can find all the Time Zones available.

Media files

There are two ways to add media files to your tweets. The first and easiest is to use one global file for all the updates:

at.schedule(tweets, time_zone="America/Santiago", media="path/to/file.png")

Also, an individual file can be set for each one of the updates:

tweets = [
    ("2030-10-28 18:50", template, "Update with an image.", "pics/owl.png"),
    ("2030-10-29 18:15", template, "Update with other media.", "videos/funny_video.mp4"),
    ("2030-11-01 13:45", template, "Tweet without media."),
]

Finally, it is possible to combine these to ways. For example, if most of the tweets are gonna use the same media and just a few will have a different or none:

tweets = [
    ("2030-11-01 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-02 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-03 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-04 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-05 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-06 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-07 13:45", template, "Tweet with global media."),
    ("2030-11-08 13:45", template, "Tweet without media.", None),
    ("2030-11-09 13:45", template, "Tweet without media.", None),
    ("2030-12-10 18:50", template, "Update with an image.", "pics/owl.png"),
    ("2030-12-11 18:15", template, "Update with other media.", "videos/funny_video.mp4"),
]

at.schedule(tweets, time_zone="America/Santiago", media="path/to/global_media.png")

Tweet a list of strings

Post ordered updates with delay, interval, and a template if needed.

Coo.tweet(updates, delay, interval, template, media, time_zone, aleatory)
from coo import Coo

at = Coo(
    "consumer_key",
    "consumer_secret",
    "access_token",
    "access_token_secret"
)

tweets = [
    "My first awesome Twitter Update",
    "My second awesome Twitter Update",
    "My third awesome Twitter Update",
    "My fourth awesome Twitter Update",
    "My fifth awesome Twitter Update",
    "My sixth awesome Twitter Update",
]

# post the twitter updates
at.tweet(tweets)

Delay

You can use datetime, date and time strings, integers as seconds and some strings as keywords: half_hour, one_hour, one_day and one_week between others to delay the post of your first update.

# datetime, date and time strings
at.tweet(tweets, delay="2030-11-24 13:45", time_zone="America/Santiago")
at.tweet(tweets, delay="2030-11-24", time_zone="Australia/Sydney")
at.tweet(tweets, delay="13:45", time_zone="America/New_York")

# "keywords"
at.tweet(tweets, delay="one_week")

# integer
at.tweet(tweets, delay=604800)

Remember to read the Notes for parsing DateTime strings.

Interval

Use integers as seconds or some strings as keywords: half_hour, one_hour, one_day and one_week between others.

# "keywords"
at.tweet(tweets, interval="four_hours")

# integers
at.tweet(tweets, interval=14400)

Template

And of course, you can also set one template for each one of the updates.

at.tweet(tweets, template=template)

Media files

Use one media file for all of your updates:

at.tweet(tweets, media="path/to/media.jpeg")

Random updates

To tweet your updates randomly:

at.tweet(tweets, aleatory=True)

Delay and Interval Keywords

Keyword Seconds
now 0
half_hour 1800
one_hour 3600
two_hours 7200
four_hours 14400
six_hours 21600
eight_hours 28800
ten_hours 36000
twelve_hours 43200
fourteen_hours 50400
sixteen_hours 57600
eighteen_hours 64800
twenty_hours 72000
twenty_two_hours 79200
one_day 86400
two_days 172800
three_days 259200
four_days 345600
five_days 432000
six_days 518400
one_week 604800

Templates

Templates are very simple, just use a multiline string and add a $message where you want your message to appear.

template = """My awesome header

$message

#python #coding #coo
"""

The Twitter API

Coo is written using the Python Twitter wrapper, and through Coo.api you gain access to all of his models:

# get your followers
followers = at.api.GetFollowers()

# get your direct messages
d_messages = at.api.GetDirectMessages()

# favorited tweets
favorites = at.api.GetFavorites()

# mentions
mentions = at.api.GetMentions()

# retweets
retweets = at.api.GetRetweets()

And a lot more. If you are interested, check their documentation.

TODO's

  • Add support for random updates.
  • Add support for media files.
  • Add support for multiple media files.
  • Add support for a history of tweets.
  • Add support for media files from URLs.
  • Add support for one template for all updates on Coo.schedule.
  • Support .toml files for configuration and tweets.
  • Support resume after a process restart (see apscheduler).
  • Add a CLI.

Documentation

Documentation available at coo.readthedocs.io.

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