Node.js library for easier interaction IBM Blockchain chaincode
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README.md

ibm-blockchain-js - [Deprecated]

This is a Node.js library for REST based interaction with Hyperledger chaincode. All ibm-blockchain-js documentation is on this page.

7/22/2016 Update! there is a new gRPC based SDK called HFC. I will continue to maintain this SDK for as long as REST exists.

12/15/2016 Update! Hyperledger Fabric v0.7+ no longer has REST apis. Therefore you should use the HFC module instead of this one.

4/28/2017 Update! There will only be bare minimum support for this SDK. For Hyperledger Fabric v1.0 it has been replaced by Fabric Client. For Hyperledger Fabric v0.6 it has been replaced by HFC

Table Of Contents:

  1. v1.0.0 Migration!
  2. IBC-js Function Documentation
  3. Chaincode Functions
  4. Object Formats
  5. Chaincode Summary File
  6. FAQ

Installation

npm install ibm-blockchain-js

Usage Steps!

(example code also provided below)

  1. Require this module
  2. Pass network + chaincode parameters to ibc.load(options, my_cb):
  3. Receive chaincode object from callback to ibc.load(). ie: my_cb(e, chaincode)
  4. You can now deploy your chaincode (if needed) with chaincode.deploy(func, args, null, cb)
  5. Use dot notation on chaincode to call any of your chaincode functions ie:
		// The functions below need to exist in your actual chaincode GoLang file(s) 
		chaincode.query.read(['a'], cb);              //will read variable "a" from current chaincode state
		chaincode.invoke.write(['a', 'test'], cb);    //will write to variable "a"
		chaincode.invoke.remove(['a'], cb);           //will delete variable "a"
		chaincode.invoke.init_marbles([ARGS], cb);    //calls my custom chaincode function init_marbles() and passes it ARGS

Example

	// Step 1 ==================================
	var Ibc1 = require('ibm-blockchain-js');
	var ibc = new Ibc1(/*logger*/);             //you can pass a logger such as winston here - optional
	var chaincode = {};

	// ==================================
	// configure ibc-js sdk
	// ==================================
	var options = 	{
		network:{
			peers:   [{
				"api_host": "xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx",
				"api_port": xxx,
				"api_port_tls": xxx,
				"id": "xxxxxx-xxxx-xxx-xxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx_vpx"
			}],
			users:  [{
				"enrollId": "user1",
				"enrollSecret": "xxxxxxxx"
			}],
			options: {							//this is optional
				quiet: true, 
				timeout: 60000
			}
		},
		chaincode:{
			zip_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/archive/master.zip',
			unzip_dir: 'marbles-chaincode-master/part2_v1.0.0',
			git_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/part2_v1.0.0'
		}
	};
	
	// Step 2 ==================================
	ibc.load(options, cb_ready);

	// Step 3 ==================================
	function cb_ready(err, cc){								//response has chaincode functions
		app1.setup(ibc, cc);
		app2.setup(ibc, cc);
	
	// Step 4 ==================================
		if(cc.details.deployed_name === ""){				//decide if I need to deploy or not
			cc.deploy('init', ['99'], null, cb_deployed);
		}
		else{
			console.log('chaincode summary file indicates chaincode has been previously deployed');
			cb_deployed();
		}
	}

	// Step 5 ==================================
	function cb_deployed(err){
		console.log('sdk has deployed code and waited');
		chaincode.query.read(['a']);
	}

Migrating from v0.0.x to v1.x.x

The interface to your chaincode functions has changed in v1.0.0 from v0.0.13! It is only a minor syntax change that should make it more clear to newcomers. All invocation functions can now be found under chaincode.invoke and all query functions can be found under chaincode.query.

Examples:

query changes - name change

	//old code
	chaincode.read('a');
	
	//new code 
	chaincode.query.read(['a']);

invoke changes - name change

	//old code
	chaincode.init_marble(args);
	chaincode.remove(args);
	chaincode.write(name, value);
	
	//new code 
	chaincode.invoke.init_marble(args);
	chaincode.invoke.remove(args);
	chaincode.invoke.write(args);

deploy changes - added options parameter

	//old code
	chaincode.deploy('init', ['99'], './cc_summaries', cb_deployed);
	
	//new code 
	chaincode.deploy('init', ['99'], {save_path: './cc_summaries', delay_ms: 60000}, cb_deployed);

register changes - added new parameter

	//old code
	ibc.register(i, enrollId, enrollSecret, [callback]);
	
	//new code 
	ibc.register(i, enrollId, enrollSecret, maxRetry, [callback]);

IBM-Blockchain-JS Documentation

Usage

Example with standard console logging:

	var Ibc1 = require('ibm-blockchain-js');
	var ibc = new Ibc1();

Example with Winston logging:

	var winston = require('winston');
	var logger = new (winston.Logger)({
		transports: [
		new (winston.transports.Console)(),
		new (winston.transports.File)({ filename: 'somefile.log' })
		]
	});
	var Ibc1 = require('ibm-blockchain-js');
	var ibc = new Ibc1(logger);             //you can pass a logger such as winston here - optional

ibc.load(options, [callback])

This is a function that wraps a typical startup using a standard Bluemix IBM Blockchain network. Take a look at how this function works, especially how it uses the register() function. If this is not applicable for your network (ie you have a custom IBM Blockchain network) you can easily create your own version of ibc.load() for your needs. It will run in order:

  1. ibc.network(options.network.peers, options.network.options) check out other options in ibc.network()
  2. ibc.register(...)
    • It will register the first peer with the first enrollId, the 2nd peer against the 2nd enrollId and so on.
    • This function only runs if users are found in options.network.users.
    • Any errors in register will stop execution and run callback(err).
  3. ibc.load_chaincode(options.chaincode, [callback])
  4. callback(err, cc)

Options:

  • maxRetry = integer - number of times to retry ibc.register() before giving up
  • [more] - same options as the function ibc.network(), click for details

Ex:

	var options = 	{
		network:{
			peers:   [{
				"api_host": "xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx",
				"api_port": xxx,
				"api_port_tls": xxx,
				"id": "xxxxxx-xxxx-xxx-xxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx_vpx"
			}],
			users:  [{
				"enrollId": "user1",
				"enrollSecret": "xxxxxxxx"
			}],
			options: {            //this is optional, gets passed to ibc.network(peers, options);
				quiet: true, 
				timeout: 60000,
				tls: true,
				maxRetry: 3
			}
		},
		chaincode:{
			zip_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/archive/master.zip', //http/https of a link to download zip
			unzip_dir: 'marbles-chaincode-master/part2_v1.0.0',                                //name/path to folder that contains the chaincode you want to deploy (path relative to unzipped root)
			git_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/part2_v1.0.0',       //git https URL. should point to the desired chaincode repo AND directory
			
			deployed_name: null    //[optional] this is the hashed name of a deployed chaincode.  if you want to run with chaincode that is already deployed set it now, else it will be set when you deploy with the sdk
		}
	};
	
	ibc.load(options, function(err, data){
		//callback here
	});

ibc.load_chaincode(options, [callback])

Load the chaincode you want to use. It will be downloaded and parsed. The callback will receive (e, obj) where e is the error format and obj is the chaincode object. "e" is null when there are no errors. The chaincode object will have dot notation to the functions in the your chaincode.

Ex:

	var options = 	{
		zip_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/archive/master.zip', //http/https of a link to download zip
		unzip_dir: 'marbles-chaincode-master/part2_v1.0.0',                                        //name/path to folder that contains the chaincode you want to deploy (path relative to unzipped root)
		git_url: 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/part2_v1.0.0',             //git https URL. should point to the desired chaincode repo AND directory
		
		deployed_name: null   //[optional] this is the hashed name of a deployed chaincode.  if you want to run with chaincode that is already deployed set it now, else it will be set when you deploy with the sdk
	};
	ibc.load_chaincode(options, cb_ready);

ibc.network(arrayPeers, [options])

Set the information about the peers in the network. This should be an array of peer objects. The options parameter is optional. Each field in options is also optional.

Options:

  • quiet = boolean - when true will print out only minimal HTTP debug information. Defaults true.
  • timeout = integer - time in ms to wait for a http response. Defaults 60000.
  • tls = boolean - when false will use HTTP instead of HTTPS. Defaults true.

Ex:

	var peers = [
		{
			"api_host": "xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx",               //ip or hostname of api for this peer
			"api_port": xxx,                             //port for api, non tls (integer)
			"api_port_tls": xxx,                         //port for api with tls. (integer)
			"id": "xxxxxx-xxxx-xxx-xxx-xxxxxxxxxxxx_vpx" //unique id of peer (string)
		}
	]
	ibc.network(peers, {quiet: false, timeout: 120000}); //can pass config options

Note only the field names you see above (api_host, api_port, api_port_tls, id) are required. If you are using a Bluemix network you will see lots of other fields in the credentials JSON blob, but they are not needed. Its also fine to include the extra fields. You can ommit the field api_port_tls if your network does not support tls. Make sure the options.tls is false.

ibc.save(path [callback])

Save the Chaincode Summary File to a path.

Ex:

	ibc.save('./');

ibc.clear([callback])

Clear any loaded chaincode files including the downloaded chaincode repo, and Chaincode Summary File.

Ex:

	ibc.clear();

ibc.chain_stats([callback])

Get statistics on the network's chain.

Ex:

	ibc.chain_stats(function(e, stats){
		console.log('got some stats', stats);
	});

Example Chain Stats:

	{
		"height": 10,
		"currentBlockHash": "n7uMlNMiOSUM8s02cslTRzZQQlVfm8wKT9FtL54o0ywy6BkvPMwSzN5R1tpquvqOwFFHyLSoW44n6rkFyvAsBw==",
		"previousBlockHash": "OESGPzacJO2Xc+5PB2zpmYVM8XlrwnEky0L2Ghok9oK1Lr/DWoxuBo2WwBca5zzJGq0fOeRQ7aOHgCjMupfL+Q=="
	}

ibc.block_stats(id, [callback])

Get statistics on a particular block in the chain.

Ex:

	ibc.block_stats(function(e, stats){
		console.log('got some stats', stats);
	});

Example Response:

	{
		"transactions": [
			{
				"type": 3,
				"chaincodeID": "EoABNWUzNGJmNWI1MWM1MWZiYzhlMWFmOThkYThhZDg0MGM2OWFjOWM5YTg4ODVlM2U0ZDBlNjNiM2I4MDc0ZWU2NjY2OWFjOTAzNTg4MzE1YTZjOGQ4ODY4M2Y1NjM0MThlMzMwNzQ3ZmVhZmU3ZWYyMGExY2Q1NGZmNzY4NWRhMTk=",
				"payload": "CrABCAESgwESgAE1ZTM0YmY1YjUxYzUxZmJjOGUxYWY5OGRhOGFkODQwYzY5YWM5YzlhODg4NWUzZTRkMGU2M2IzYjgwNzRlZTY2NjY5YWM5MDM1ODgzMTVhNmM4ZDg4NjgzZjU2MzQxOGUzMzA3NDdmZWFmZTdlZjIwYTFjZDU0ZmY3Njg1ZGExORomCgtpbml0X21hcmJsZRIHcng2YXRzcBIFZ3JlZW4SAjM1EgNCb2I=",
				"uuid": "b3da1d08-19b8-4d8c-a116-b46defb07a7c",
				"timestamp": {
					"seconds": 1453997627,
					"nanos": 856894462
				}
			}
		],
		"stateHash": "81ci8IAOeDh0ZwFM6hE/b3SfXt4tnZFemib7sI95cOsNcYMmtRxBWRBA7qnjPOCGU6snBRsFVnAliZXUigQ03w==",
		"previousBlockHash": "tpjUh4sgbaUQFO8wm8S8nrm7yCrBa4rphIiujfaYAlEVfzI8IZ0mjYMf+GiOZ6CZRNWPmf+5bekmGIfr0H6zdw==",
		"nonHashData": {
			"localLedgerCommitTimestamp": {
			"seconds": 1453997627,
			"nanos": 868868790
			}
		}
	}

ibc.switchPeer(peerIndex)

The SDK will default to use peer[0]. This function will switch the default peer to another index.

Ex:

	ibc.switchPeer(2);

ibc.register(peerIndex, enrollId, enrollsecret, maxRetry, [callback])

Only applicable on a network with security enabled. register() will register against peer[peerIndex] with the provided credentials. If successful, the peer will now use this enrollId to perform any http requests.

  • peerIndex = integer - position of peer in peers array (the one you fed ibc.networks()) you want to register against.
  • enrollId = string - name of secure context user.
  • enrollSecret = string - password/secret/api key of secure context user.
  • maxRetry = integer - number of times to retry this call before giving up.

Ex:

	ibc.register(3, 'user1', 'xxxxxx', 3, my_cb);

ibc.monitor_blockheight(callback)

This will call your callback function whenever the block height has changed. ie. whenever a new block has been written to the chain. It will also pass you the same response as in chain_stats().

Ex:

	ibc.monitor_blockheight(my_callback);
	function my_callback(e, chainstats){
		console.log('got a new block!', chainstats);
	}

ibc.get_transaction(udid, [callback])

Get information about a particular transaction ID.

Ex:

	ibc.get_transaction('d30a1445-185f-4853-b4d6-ee7b4dfa5534', function(err, data){
		console.log('found trans', err, data);
	});


##Chaincode Functions

  • Chaincode functions are dependent on actually be found inside your Go chaincode
  • My advice is to build your chaincode off of the Marble Application one. This way you get the basic CRUD functions below:

chaincode.deploy(func, args, [options], [enrollId], [callback])

Deploy the chaincode. Call GoLang function named 'func' and feed it 'args'. Usually "args" is an array of strings. The enrollId parameter should be the desired secure context enrollId that has already been registered against the selected peer. If left null the SDK will use a known enrollId for the selected peer. (this is only relevant in a permissioned network)

Options:

  • save_path = save the Chaincode Summary File to 'save_path'.
  • delay_ms = time in milliseconds to postpone the callback after deploy. Default is 40000

Ex:

	chaincode.deploy('init', ['99'], {delay_ms: 60000}, cb_deployed);

chaincode.query.CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME(args, [enrollId], [callback])

Will invoke your Go function CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME and pass it args. Usually args is an array of strings. The enrollId parameter should be the desired secure context enrollId that has already been registered against the selected peer. If left null the SDK will use a known enrollId for the selected peer. (this is only relevant in a permissioned network)

Ex:

	chaincode.query.read(['abc'], function(err, data){
		console.log('read abc:', data, err);
	});

chaincode.invoke.CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME(args, [enrollId], [callback])

Will query your Go function CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME and pass it args. Usually args is an array of strings. The enrollId parameter should be the desired secure context enrollId that has already been registered against the selected peer. If left null the SDK will use a known enrollId for the selected peer. (this is only relevant in a permissioned network)

Ex:

	chaincode.invoke.init_marbles([args], function(err, data){
		console.log('create marble response:', data, err);
	});

chaincode.query.read(name, [enrollId], [callback]) depreciated 4/1/2016

This function is only here to help people transition from ibc v0.0.x to v1.x.x. You should create your own read() function in your chaincode which will overwrite this prebuilt one. This function will put the name argument into args[0] and set function to query. These are passed to the chaincode function Query(stub *shim.ChaincodeStub, function string, args []string).

Read variable named name from chaincode state. This will call the Query() function in the Go chaincode. The enrollId parameter should be the desired secure context enrollId that has already been registered against the selected peer. If left null the SDK will use a known enrollId for the selected peer. (this is only relevant in a permissioned network)



Formats

Chaincode Object

This is the main guy. It is returned in the callback to load_chaincode() and contains all your cc functions + some of the setup/input data.

	chaincode = 
		{
			query: {
				CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME1: function(args, cb){etc...};	//call chaincode function and pass it args
				CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME2: function(args, cb){etc...};
				^^ etc...
			}
			invoke: {
				CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME1: function(args, cb){etc...};	//call chaincode function and pass it args
				CUSTOM_FUNCTION_NAME2: function(args, cb){etc...};
				^^ etc...
			}
			deploy: function(func, args, path, cb),     //deploy loaded chaincode
			details:{                                   //input options get stored here, sometimes its handy
						deployed_name: '',              //hash of deployed chaincode
						func: {
							invoke: [],                 //array of function names found
							query: []                   //array of function names found
						},
						git_url: '',
						peers: [],                      //peer list provided in network()
						timestamp: 0,                   //utc unix timestamp in ms of parsing
						users: [],                      //users provided in load()
						unzip_dir: '',
						zip_url: '',
			}
		};

Error Format

	{
		name: "input error",                       //short name of error
		code: 400,                                 //http error status code, integer
		details: {msg: "did not provide git_url"}  //description of error, obj of unknown makeup
	};

Chaincode Summary File

This file is used internally when debugging. It is created in ibc.load_chaincode() and updated with chaincode.deploy(). A copy can be saved elsewhere with ibc.save(path). I found it handy in niche cases, but it will probably be unhelpful to most developers.

	{
	"details": {
		"deployed_name": "f6c084c42b3bde90c03f214ac6e0426e3e594807901fb1464287f2c3a18ade717bc495298958287594f81bb0d0cfdd3b4346d438d3b587d4fc73cf78ae8f7dfe",
		"func": {
					"invoke": ["init", "delete", "write", "init_marble", "set_user", "open_trade", "perform_trade"],
				},
				{
					"query": []
				},
		"git_url": 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/part2_v1.0.0'
		"peers": [{
			"name": "vp1-xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx",
			"api_host": "xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx",
			"api_port": xxx,
			"id": "xxxxx_vp1",
			"tls": false,
			"enrollId": "user1"
		}],
		"timestamp": 1459779181971,
		"users": [{
			"enrollId": "xxx",
			"enrollSecret": "xxx"
		}],
		"unzip_dir": 'marbles-chaincode-master/part2_v1.0.0',
		"zip_url": 'https://github.com/ibm-blockchain/marbles-chaincode/archive/master.zip',
		"options": {}
		}
	}

FAQ

Do you have any examples that use this?

How exactly do I write chaincode?

  • We have a "hello world" like tutorial for chaincode over at Learn Chaincode

I'm getting error code 2 in my deploy response?

  • Your chaincode has build issues and is not compiling. Manually build it in your local machine to get details.

I'm getting error code 1!

  • The shim version your chaincode import has is not the same as the shim the peer is running. ie you are probably running 'Hyperledger' peer code and sending it chaincode with a shim pointing to "OBC-Peer".