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Typescript Definitions for Mithril 2.x

Types are maintained at DefinitelyTyped. Submit PRs there but you can submit issues, questions or suggestions here.

Install

Requires TypeScript 3.2 or later.

Install types for the current version of Mithril from npm with:

npm install -D @types/mithril

For pre-release versions of Mithril, the next branch on this repo will align with the next branch of Mithril. You can install these types with:

npm install -D MithrilJS/mithril.d.ts#next

It's not recommended to install any other branches, including master, from this repo. Use npm/DefinitelyTyped for official releases.

Promise support in ES5

Please note that while Mithril polyfills Promise support, this type definition does not include a type declaration for Promises. You may see an error like:

'Promise' only refers to a type, but is being used as a value here.

To use promises, you should add the "es2015.promise" library option to your compiler options. In tsconfig.json:

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "target": "es5",
    "lib": [
      "es2015.promise",
      ...
    ]
  }
}

ES Module Interop

In order to import Mithril's commonjs export in the form:

import m from 'mithril';

you may need to set the "esModuleInterop" option in your tsconfig.json.

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "esModuleInterop": true,
    ...
  }
}

For Rollup, instead you should enable "allowSyntheticDefaultImports":

{
  "compilerOptions": {
    "allowSyntheticDefaultImports": true,
    ...
  }
}

These settings may depend on the bundler you're using.


The Gist:

Component examples

Simple, stateless POJO Component with attrs types

import m from 'mithril';

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  count: number;
}

const MyComp: m.Component<Attrs> = {
  view (vnode) {
    return m('span', `name: ${vnode.attrs.name}, count: ${vnode.attrs.count}`);
  }
};

If you prefer the convenience of destructuring, you could rewrite MyComp like:

const MyComp: m.Component<Attrs> = {
  view ({attrs: {name, count}}) {
    return m('span', `name: ${name}, count: ${count}`);
  }
};

ClosureComponent (AKA FactoryComponent)

The easiest way to annotate a stateful component and to make best use of inference is by holding state in a closure:

import m from 'mithril';

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  initialValue: number;
}

function Counter(): m.Component<Attrs> {
  let count = 0;
  function increment() {
    count++;
  }
  function decrement() {
    count--;
  }
  return {
    oninit ({attrs}) {
      count = attrs.initialValue;
    },
    view ({attrs}) {
      return m('.counter',
        m('span', `name: ${attrs.name}, count: ${count}`),
        m('button', {onclick: increment}, '+'),
        m('button', {onclick: decrement}, '-')
      );
    }
  };
}

In the above example, local state types can usually be inferred at declaration time and you don't need to worry about how this may be bound since you never need to write this.

In the following example, we want to use the initial Vnode. Here we annotate the whole function rather than just its return type, and the initial vnode type is inferred.

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  initialValue: number;
}

const Counter: m.ClosureComponent<Attrs> = vnode => {
  let count = vnode.attrs.initialValue
  function increment() {
    count++;
  }
  function decrement() {
    count--;
  }
  return {
    view ({attrs}) {
      return m('.counter',
        m('span', `name: ${attrs.name}, count: ${count}`),
        m('button', {onclick: increment}, '+'),
        m('button', {onclick: decrement}, '-')
      );
    }
  };
};

ClassComponent

Note that Typescript cannot infer types for class methods. When using classes you must annotate the incoming Vnode type for component hook methods.

import m from 'mithril';

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  initialValue: number;
}

class Counter implements m.ClassComponent<Attrs> {
  count = 0;
  // Use arrow functions so `this` is bound as expected
  increment = () => {
    this.count++;
  };
  decrement = () => {
    this.count--;
  };
  // The constructor can be used in place of oninit
  constructor({attrs}: m.CVnode<Attrs>) {
    this.count = attrs.initialValue;
  }
  // Note that class methods cannot infer parameter types
  view ({attrs}: m.CVnode<Attrs>) {
    return m('.counter',
      m('span', `name: ${attrs.name}, count: ${this.count}`),
      m('button', {onclick: this.increment}, '+'),
      m('button', {onclick: this.decrement}, '-')
    );
  }
}

Stateful POJO Component

Another way to hold state is in vnode.state.

import m from 'mithril';

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  initialValue: number;
}

interface State {
  count: number;
  increment(): void;
  decrement(): void;
}

const Counter: m.Component<Attrs, State> = {
  oninit ({state}) {
    state.count = 0;
    state.increment = () => {state.count++};
    state.decrement = () => {state.count--};
  },
  view ({attrs, state}) {
    return m('.counter',
      m('span', `name: ${attrs.name}, count: ${state.count}`),
      m('button', {onclick: state.increment}, '+'),
      m('button', {onclick: state.decrement}, '-')
    );
  }
};

POJO Comp type

In a POJO component hook, this is a reference to vnode.state. To have this inferred correctly, use the m.Comp type.

import m from 'mithril';

interface Attrs {
  name: string;
  initialValue: number;
}

interface State {
  count: number;
  increment(): void;
  decrement(): void;
}

const Counter: m.Comp<Attrs, State> = {
  count: 0,
  increment() {
    this.count++;
  },
  decrement() {
    this.count--;
  },
  oninit ({attrs}) {
    this.count = attrs.initialValue;
  },
  view ({attrs}) {
    return m('.counter',
      m('span', `name: ${attrs.name}, count: ${this.count}`),
      m('button', {onclick: () => {this.increment()}}, '+'),
      m('button', {onclick: () => {this.decrement()}}, '-')
    );
  }
};

Plain view functions

Sometimes you can just as easily use functions in place of components. Usually the return type will be inferred as being compatible with m.Children, or you can annotate it specifically if you prefer:

function titleView(title: string): m.Children {
  return m('h1', title);
}

Stream example:

import Stream from 'mithril/stream';

const num = Stream(1);
const text = Stream<string>();
let s: Stream<Foo>;
s = Stream(new Foo());

JSX/TSX

Library support is required for full TSX support and cannot be accomplished with types alone. See the NPM package mithril-tsx-component.

Script/Global Usage

If you are adding mithril to your page as a separate script, then you can install the global version of these types.


For more example usage see the test folder.

NOTE This repo is not guaranteed to be in sync with DefinitelyTyped. Please use the DT types for your applications. This repo is maintained primarily for documentation and issues.

Install this repo

npm install

Test lint

npm run lint

You can also try compiling with npm test (which runs tsc) however there are intentional errors in the tests to ensure type checks will catch those errors.