Complete code for the larger example programs from the book.
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README.md

Code Examples for Programming Rust

This repository contains complete code for the larger example programs from the book “Programming Rust”, by Jim Blandy and Jason Orendorff.

Each subdirectory is a distinct Rust project, with its own Cargo.toml file. You should be able to enter each directory and use cargo build and cargo test. For those projects that define programs, cargo run should run them.

The example code in this directory and its subdirectories is licensed under the terms of the MIT license. See LICENSE-MIT for details.

Chapter 2: A Tour of Rust

  • The gcd directory holds the command-line program for computing the greatest common denominator of a list of numbers.

  • The iron-gcd directory holds the code for the simple web service, implemented using the iron framework, that computes greatest common denominators.

  • The Mandelbrot plotting program has its own repository, at https://github.com/ProgrammingRust/mandelbrot. This repository contains several branches, each showing a different implementation strategy. The single-threaded branch holds the code for the single-threaded version, and the bands branch holds the multi-threaded version. Chapter 19, “Concurrency”, shows several other approaches, which appear on other branches; see the repository's README.md file for details.

Chapter 8: Crates and Modules

  • We did not actually write a fern simulator. Please accept our sincere apology for this feckless deception. But the skeleton of modules and definitions we show in the book is in the fern_sim subdirectory.

Chapter 9: Structs

  • The queue directory holds a library that defines the Queue type, representing a queue of char values.

  • The generic-queue directory holds code for generic Queue type.

Chapter 10: Enums and Patterns

  • The binary-tree directory holds the source code for the BinaryTree type that appears in the “Generic Enums” and “Populating a Binary Tree” sections.

Chapter 12: Operator Overloading

  • The complex directory holds the Complex type used as a running example throughout the chapter.

  • The interval directory holds the Interval type for which the book implements the std::cmp::PartialOrd trait.

Chapter 14: Closures

  • The 'basic-router' directory holds the BasicRouter type used as an example in the “Callbacks” section.

Chapter 15: Iterators

  • The binary-tree directory holds the implementation of the Iterator trait for the BinaryTree type originally defined in the “Enums and Patterns” chapter.

Chapter 17: Strings and Text

  • The complex directory includes the implementation of the std::fmt::Display formatting trait for a complex number type, shown in the section “Formatting Your Own Types”.

Chapter 18: Input and Output

  • The grep directory holds the simple grep-like program shown in the section “Reading Lines”.

  • The copy directory holds the program for copying directory trees from the section “Reading Directories”, including the additions shown in the next section, “Platform-Specific Features”.

  • The echo-server directory holds the simple network service shown in the “Networking” section.

  • The http-get directory holds the command-line program that uses the reqwest crate to carry out an HTTP request.

Chapter 19: Concurrency

  • The search engine used as a running example throughout the book has its own repository, at https://github.com/ProgrammingRust/fingertips.

  • The Mandelbrot set plotter discussed in the section “Revisiting the Mandelbrot Set” also has its own repository, at https://github.com/ProgrammingRust/mandelbrot. The repository includes several branches exploring different implementations; see the repository's README.md file for details.

Chapter 20: Macros

  • The json-macro directory holds the definition of the json! macro built in the section “The json! Macro”.

Chapter 21: Unsafe Code

  • The ascii directory holds the Ascii type used as an example in the sections “Unsafe Blocks” and “Unsafe Functions”.

  • The ref-with-flag directory holds the RefWithFlag type from the “Raw Pointers” section.

  • The gap-buffer directory holds the GapBuffer type, used in the “Raw Pointers” section to illustrate pointer arithmetic and std::ptr::read and std::ptr::write.

  • The libgit2-rs and libgit2-rs-safe directories contain the two versions of the program that uses Rust's foreign function interface to call functions from the libgit2 C library. The version in libgit2-rs is written as a single giant block of unsafe code, whereas the version in libgit2-rs-safe implements a safe Rust interface to the same functionality, using Rust's type system to enforce libgit2's rules for proper use of the library.

    Note that both of these require you to have a copy of libgit2 present on your system. The chapter provides detailed instructions for building the correct version, for Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.