Make React Hooks out of your Recompose enhancers
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README.md

Rehook

Build Status

Rehook implements an API similar to Recompose, but using React Hooks.

Note, React Hooks are in alpha. Refer to the official documentation: React Hooks

npm i @synvox/rehook

What is Rehook?

Hooks are a great idea and I want to migrate my enhancers from Recompose to React Hooks.

React Hooks can do most of what Recompose can do, but without wrapping components in other components. This is a huge win! But what happens to all the code written to use recompose? Rehook is a migration strategy from higher order components to hooks.

Backwards Compatibility

Before Promises, JavaScript developers used a pattern called “error first callbacks”. Callbacks are flexible and easy to understand, but not composable. This lead to “the callback pyramid of doom” where callbacks were called in callbacks.

When promises were introduced, suddenly developers were able to chain asynchronous code together with .then(). This was great and simplified asynchronous code. Callbacks still exist (and should) because they are often the best tool for the job. Promises are composable, but are more difficult to reason about than a single callback.

Then the JavaScript community got async/await. It was like magic! Suddenly we could write asynchronous code imperatively, and it used promises under the hood. This was important because Promise based logic could be easily reused with async/await.

In React, we’re undergoing a similar renaissance. Higher Order Components are like Promises: easily composable, not easily understood. Render Props are like callbacks: understandable, flexible, not easily composable. React Hooks are like async/await. Suddenly we can write understandable, composable logic and decouple reusable logic from components.

There are tons of higher order component code written with Recompose, that could (and should) use hooks instead, but there is no migration plan. Luckily recompose in an implementation of functional mixins on React components. We can recreate this interface but use hooks instead of components. This way you can use your existing Recompose enhancers as hooks, similar to how you can use your existing Promise based code with async/await.

With Rehook

import React from 'react'

import { withState, pipe, withHandlers } from '@synvox/rehook'

const useCount = pipe(
  withState('count', 'setCount', 0),
  withHandlers({
    increment: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count + 1),
    decrement: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count - 1),
  })
)

function Counter() {
  const { count, increment, decrement } = useCount()

  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={decrement}>-1</button>
      {count}
      <button onClick={increment}>+1</button>
    </div>
  )
}

export default Counter

With Recompose

import React from 'react'

import { compose, withState, withHandlers } from 'recompose'

const enhance = compose(
  withState('count', 'setCount', 0),
  withHandlers({
    increment: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count + 1),
    decrement: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count - 1),
  })
)

function Counter({ count, increment, decrement }) {
  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={decrement}>-1</button>
      {count}
      <button onClick={increment}>+1</button>
    </div>
  )
}

export default enhance(Counter)

Notice how subtle the changes are.

Smart/Presentational Components:

In Recompose, you are required to pass all props through each component until it reaches your presentational component. This is not the case with Rehook, but you may choose run all your props through an enhancer using pipe(). This will look more familiar to those who have used recompose before.

import React from 'react'

import { withState, pipe, withHandlers } from '@synvox/rehook'

const enhance = pipe(
  withState('count', 'setCount', 0),
  withHandlers({
    increment: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count + 1),
    decrement: ({ count, setCount }) => () => setCount(count - 1),
  })
)

function Counter({ count, increment, decrement }) {
  return (
    <div>
      <button onClick={decrement}>-1</button>
      {count}
      <button onClick={increment}>+1</button>
    </div>
  )
}

export default pipe(
  enhance,
  Counter
)

Docs

Full disclaimer: Most of these docs are modified from the Recompose docs.

pipe()

pipe(...functions: Array<Function>): Function

In recompose, you compose enhancers. In rehook each enhancer is a function that takes props and returns new props. Use pipe instead of compose to chain these together.

mapProps()

mapProps(
  propsMapper: (ownerProps: Object) => Object,
): (props: Object) => Object

Accepts a function that maps owner props to a new collection of props that are passed to the base component.

withProps()

withProps(
  createProps: (ownerProps: Object) => Object | Object
): (props: Object) => Object

Like mapProps(), except the newly created props are merged with the owner props.

Instead of a function, you can also pass a props object directly. In this form, it is similar to defaultProps(), except the provided props take precedence over props from the owner.

withPropsOnChange()

withPropsOnChange(
  shouldMapOrKeys: Array<string> | (props: Object, nextProps: Object) => boolean,
  createProps: (ownerProps: Object) => Object
): (props: Object) => Object

Like withProps(), except the new props are only created when one of the owner props specified by shouldMapOrKeys changes. This helps ensure that expensive computations inside createProps() are only executed when necessary.

Instead of an array of prop keys, the first parameter can also be a function that returns a boolean, given the current props and the next props. This allows you to customize when createProps() should be called.

withHandlers()

withHandlers(
  handlerCreators: {
    [handlerName: string]: (props: Object) => Function
  } |
  handlerCreatorsFactory: (initialProps) => {
    [handlerName: string]: (props: Object) => Function
  }
): (props: Object) => Object

Takes an object map of handler creators or a factory function. These are higher-order functions that accept a set of props and return a function handler:

This allows the handler to access the current props via closure, without needing to change its signature.

Usage example:

const useForm = pipe(
  withState('value', 'updateValue', ''),
  withHandlers({
    onChange: props => event => {
      props.updateValue(event.target.value)
    },
    onSubmit: props => event => {
      event.preventDefault()
      submitForm(props.value)
    },
  })
)

function Form() {
  const { value, onChange, onSubmit } = useForm()

  return (
    <form onSubmit={onSubmit}>
      <label>
        Value
        <input type="text" value={value} onChange={onChange} />
      </label>
    </form>
  )
}

namespace()

namespace(
  namespaceKey: string | symbol,
  createProps: (ownerProps: Object) => () => Object
): (props: Object) => Object

The namespace function allows you to scope an enhancer at a key. It does the opposite of flattenProp(), by assigning the result of a call to a key specified by namespaceKey on the props object.

Usage Example:

const useForm = pipe(
  withState('value', 'updateValue', ''),
  namespace('handlers', parentProps =>
    pipe(
      withHandlers({
        onChange: props => event => {
          parentProps.updateValue(event.target.value)
        },
        onSubmit: props => event => {
          event.preventDefault()
          submitForm(parentProps.value)
        },
      })
    )
  )
)

function Form() {
  const {
    value,
    handlers: { onChange, onSubmit },
  } = useForm()

  return (
    <form onSubmit={onSubmit}>
      <label>
        Value
        <input type="text" value={value} onChange={onChange} />
      </label>
    </form>
  )
}

defaultProps()

defaultProps(
  props: Object
): (props: Object) => Object

Specifies props to be included by default. Similar to withProps(), except the props from the owner take precedence over props provided to defaultProps().

renameProp()

renameProp(
  oldName: string,
  newName: string
): (props: Object) => Object

Renames a single prop.

renameProps()

renameProps(
  nameMap: { [key: string]: string }
): (props: Object) => Object

Renames multiple props, using a map of old prop names to new prop names.

flattenProp()

flattenProp(
  propName: string
): (props: Object) => Object

Flattens a prop so that its fields are spread out into the props object.

const useProps = pipe(
  withProps({
    object: { a: 'a', b: 'b' },
    c: 'c',
  }),
  flattenProp('object')
)

// useProps() returns: { a: 'a', b: 'b', c: 'c', object: { a: 'a', b: 'b' } }

withState()

withState(
  stateName: string,
  stateUpdaterName: string,
  initialState: any | (props: Object) => any
): (props: Object) => Object

Includes two additional props: a state value, and a function to update that state value. The state updater has the following signature:

stateUpdater<T>((prevValue: T) => T, ?callback: Function): void
stateUpdater(newValue: any, ?callback: Function): void

The first form accepts a function which maps the previous state value to a new state value. You'll likely want to use this state updater along with withHandlers() to create specific updater functions. For example, to create an enhancer that adds basic counting functionality to a component:

const addCounting = pipe(
  withState('counter', 'setCounter', 0),
  withHandlers({
    increment: ({ setCounter }) => () => setCounter(n => n + 1),
    decrement: ({ setCounter }) => () => setCounter(n => n - 1),
    reset: ({ setCounter }) => () => setCounter(0),
  })
)

The second form accepts a single value, which is used as the new state.

Both forms accept an optional second parameter, a callback function that will be executed once setState() is completed and the component is re-rendered.

An initial state value is required. It can be either the state value itself, or a function that returns an initial state given the initial props.

withStateHandlers()

withStateHandlers(
  (initialState: Object | ((props: Object) => any)),
  (stateUpdaters: {
    [key: string]: (
      state: Object,
      props: Object
    ) => (...payload: any[]) => Object,
  })
)

Passes state object properties and immutable updater functions in a form of (...payload: any[]) => Object.

Every state updater function accepts state, props and payload and must return a new state or undefined. The new state is shallowly merged with the previous state. Returning undefined does not cause a component rerender.

Example:

const useCounter = withStateHandlers(
  ({ initialCounter = 0 }) => ({
    counter: initialCounter,
  }),
  {
    incrementOn: ({ counter }) => value => ({
      counter: counter + value,
    }),
    decrementOn: ({ counter }) => value => ({
      counter: counter - value,
    }),
    resetCounter: (_, { initialCounter = 0 }) => () => ({
      counter: initialCounter,
    }),
  }
)

function Counter() {
  const { counter, incrementOn, decrementOn, resetCounter } = useCounter()

  return (
    <div>
      <Button onClick={() => incrementOn(2)}>Inc</Button>
      <Button onClick={() => decrementOn(3)}>Dec</Button>
      <Button onClick={resetCounter}>Reset</Button>
    </div>
  )
}

withReducer()

withReducer<S, A>(
  stateName: string,
  dispatchName: string,
  reducer: (state: S, action: A) => S,
  initialState: S | (ownerProps: Object) => S
): (props: Object) => Object

Similar to withState(), but state updates are applied using a reducer function. A reducer is a function that receives a state and an action, and returns a new state.

Passes two additional props to the base component: a state value, and a dispatch method. The dispatch method has the following signature:

dispatch(action: Object, ?callback: Function): void

It sends an action to the reducer, after which the new state is applied. It also accepts an optional second parameter, a callback function with the new state as its only argument.

branch()

branch(
  test: (props: Object) => boolean,
  left: (props: Object) => Object,
  right: ?(props: Object) => Object
): (props: Object) => Object

Accepts a test function and two functions. The test function is passed the props from the owner. If it returns true, the left function called with props; otherwise, the right function is called with props. If the right is not supplied, it will return props like normal.

renderComponent()

renderComponent(
  Component: ReactClass | ReactFunctionalComponent | string
): (props: Object) => Object

Stops the function execution and renders a component. Use with catchRender().

renderComponent() is a tricky enhancer to implement with hooks. 😔 It will throw a component to signal to rehook() that it should stop the function and render that component. This sometimes causes issues with hook’s positional state system. It is advised to use renderComponent() after stateful enhancers like withState and after effect handlers like lifecycle. React will throw an error if this is called too soon.

This is useful in combination with another enhancer like branch():

// `isLoading()` is a function that returns whether or not the component
// is in a loading state
const spinnerWhileLoading = isLoading =>
  branch(
    isLoading,
    renderComponent(Spinner) // `Spinner` is a React component
  )

// Now use the `spinnerWhileLoading()` helper to add a loading spinner to any
// base component
const break = spinnerWhileLoading(
  props => !(props.title && props.author && props.content)
)

const Post = catchRender((props) => {
  useSpinner(props)
  const { title, author, content } = props

 	return (
	  <article>
	    <h1>{title}</h1>
	    <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
	    <div>{content}</div>
	  </article>
	)
})

export default Post

renderNothing()

renderNothing: (props: Object) => Object

An enhancer that always renders null. Use with catchRender().

renderNothing() is a tricky enhancer to implement with hooks. 😔 It will throw a component to signal to rehook() that it should stop the function and render that component. This sometimes causes issues with hook’s positional state system. It is advised to use renderNothing() after stateful enhancers like withState and after effect handlers like lifecycle. React will throw an error if this is called too soon.

This is useful in combination with another helper that expects a higher-order component, like branch():

// `hasNoData()` is a function that returns true if the component has
// no data
const hideIfNoData = hasNoData => branch(hasNoData, renderNothing)

// Now use the `hideIfNoData()` helper to hide any base component
const useHidden = hideIfNoData(
  props => !(props.title && props.author && props.content)
)

const Post = catchRender(props => {
  useHidden(props)
  const { title, author, content } = props

  return (
    <article>
      <h1>{title}</h1>
      <h2>By {author.name}</h2>
      <div>{content}</div>
    </article>
  )
})

export default Post

catchRender()

catchRender(
  component: (props: Object) => ReactElement
): FunctionComponent

If you use renderComponent() or renderNothing() wrap your function component with with catchRender().

lifecycle()

lifecycle(
  spec: Object,
): (props: Object) => Object

Lifecycle supports componentDidMount, componentWillUnmount, componentDidUpdate.

Any state changes made in a lifecycle method, by using setState, will be merged with props.

Example:

const usePosts = lifecycle({
  componentDidMount() {
    fetchPosts().then(posts => {
      this.setState({ posts })
    })
  },
})

function PostsList() {
  const { posts = [] } = usePosts()

  return (
    <ul>
      {posts.map(p => (
        <li>{p.title}</li>
      ))}
    </ul>
  )
}

Test Utility:

Rehook also provides a test utility for testing enhancers. This makes writing tests easy and readable. This depends on enzyme.

Usage Example:

import testEnhancer from '@synvox/rehook/test-utils'

// Somehow import your enhancer:
const enhancer = withState('state', 'setState', 0)

test('with state', () => {
  const getProps = testEnhancer(enhancer)

  expect(getProps().state).toEqual(0)
  getProps().setState(1)
  expect(getProps().state).toEqual(1)
})