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Auth0.Android

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Android Java & Kotlin toolkit for consuming the Auth0 Authentication API

Requirements

Android API version 21 or later and Java 8+.

Here’s what you need in build.gradle to target Java 8 byte code for Android and Kotlin plugins respectively.

android {
    compileOptions {
        sourceCompatibility JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
        targetCompatibility JavaVersion.VERSION_1_8
    }

    kotlinOptions {
        jvmTarget = '1.8'
    }
}

Installation

Gradle

Auth0.android is available through Gradle. To install it, simply add the following line to your build.gradle file:

dependencies {
    implementation 'com.auth0.android:auth0:2.7.0'
}

Permissions

Open your app's AndroidManifest.xml file and add the following permission.

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />

Usage

First, create an instance of Auth0 with your Application information

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_DOMAIN}")

Alternatively, you can save your Application information in the strings.xml file using the following names:

<resources>
    <string name="com_auth0_client_id">YOUR_CLIENT_ID</string>
    <string name="com_auth0_domain">YOUR_DOMAIN</string>
</resources>

You can then create a new Auth0 instance by passing an Android Context:

val account = Auth0(context)

OIDC Conformant Mode

Beginning in version 2, this SDK is OIDC-Conformant by default, and will not use any legacy authentication endpoints.

For more information, please see the OIDC adoption guide.

Authentication with Universal Login

First go to the Auth0 Dashboard and go to your application's settings. Make sure you have in Allowed Callback URLs a URL with the following format:

https://{YOUR_AUTH0_DOMAIN}/android/{YOUR_APP_PACKAGE_NAME}/callback

Remember to replace {YOUR_APP_PACKAGE_NAME} with your actual application's package name, available in your app/build.gradle file as the applicationId value.

Next, define the Manifest Placeholders for the Auth0 Domain and Scheme which are going to be used internally by the library to register an intent-filter. Go to your application's build.gradle file and add the manifestPlaceholders line as shown below:

apply plugin: 'com.android.application'

android {
    compileSdkVersion 30
    defaultConfig {
        applicationId "com.auth0.samples"
        minSdkVersion 21
        targetSdkVersion 30
        //...

        //---> Add the next line
        manifestPlaceholders = [auth0Domain: "@string/com_auth0_domain", auth0Scheme: "https"]
        //<---
    }
    //...
}

It's a good practice to define reusable resources like @string/com_auth0_domain, but you can also hard-code the value. The scheme value can be either https or a custom one. Read this section to learn more.

Add the internet permission.

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.INTERNET" />

Declare the callback instance that will receive the authentication result.

val callback = object : Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
    override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) {
        // Failure! Check the exception for details
    }

    override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) {
        // Success! Access token and ID token are presents
    }
}

Finally, authenticate by showing the Auth0 Universal Login:

// Configure and launch the authentication
WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .start(this, callback)

The callback will get invoked when the user returns to your application. There are a few scenarios where this may fail:

  • When the device cannot open the URL because it doesn't have any compatible browser application installed. You can check this scenario with error.isBrowserAppNotAvailable.
  • When the user manually closed the browser (e.g. pressing the back key). You can check this scenario with error.isAuthenticationCanceled.
  • When there was a server error. Check the received exception for details.

If the redirect URL is not found in the Allowed Callback URLs of your Auth0 Application, the server will not make the redirection and the browser will remain open.

Token Validation

The ID token received as part of this web authentication flow is automatically verified following the OpenID Connect specification.

If you are a user of Auth0 Private Cloud with "Custom Domains" still on the legacy behavior, you need to override the expected issuer to match your Auth0 domain before starting the authentication.

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_CUSTOM_DOMAIN}")

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withIdTokenVerificationIssuer("https://{YOUR_AUTH0_DOMAIN}/")
    .start(this, callback)
A note about App Deep Linking:

If you followed the configuration steps documented here, you may have noticed the default scheme used for the Callback URI is https. This works best for Android API 23 or newer if you're using Android App Links, but in previous Android versions this may show the intent chooser dialog prompting the user to choose either your application or the browser. You can change this behaviour by using a custom unique scheme so that the OS opens directly the link with your app. Note that the schemes can only have lowercase letters.

  1. Update the auth0Scheme Manifest Placeholder on the app/build.gradle file or update the intent-filter declaration in the AndroidManifest.xml to use the new scheme.
  2. Update the Allowed Callback URLs in your Auth0 Dashboard application's settings.
  3. Call withScheme() in the WebAuthProvider builder passing the custom scheme you want to use.
WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withScheme("myapp")
    .start(this, callback)

Authenticate with any Auth0 connection

The connection must first be enabled in the Auth0 dashboard for this Auth0 application.

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withConnection("twitter")
    .start(this, callback)

Specify audience

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withAudience("https://{YOUR_AUTH0_DOMAIN}/api/v2/")
    .start(this, callback)

The sample above requests tokens with the audience required to call the Management API endpoints.

Replace {YOUR_AUTH0_DOMAIN} with your actual Auth0 domain (i.e. mytenant.auth0.com). If you've set up the tenant to use "Custom Domains", use that value here.

Specify scope

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withScope("openid profile email read:users")
    .start(this, callback)

The default scope used is openid profile email. Regardless of the scopes passed here, the openid scope is always enforced.

Specify Connection scope

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withConnectionScope("email", "profile", "calendar:read")
    .start(this, callback)

Customize the Custom Tabs UI

If the device where the app is running has a Custom Tabs compatible Browser, a Custom Tab will be preferred for the logout flow. You can customize the Page Title visibility, the Toolbar color, and the supported Browser applications by using the CustomTabsOptions class.

val ctOptions = CustomTabsOptions.newBuilder()
    .withToolbarColor(R.color.ct_toolbar_color)
    .showTitle(true)
    .build()
 
WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withCustomTabsOptions(ctOptions)
    .start(this, callback)

Clearing the session

To log the user out and clear the SSO cookies that the Auth0 Server keeps attached to your browser app, you need to call the logout endpoint. This can be done is a similar fashion to how you authenticated before: using the WebAuthProvider class.

Make sure to revisit that section to configure the Manifest Placeholders if you still cannot authenticate successfully. The values set there are used to generate the URL that the server will redirect the user back to after a successful log out.

In order for this redirection to happen, you must copy the Allowed Callback URLs value you added for authentication into the Allowed Logout URLs field in your application settings. Both fields should have an URL with the following format:

https://{YOUR_AUTH0_DOMAIN}/android/{YOUR_APP_PACKAGE_NAME}/callback

Remember to replace {YOUR_APP_PACKAGE_NAME} with your actual application's package name, available in your app/build.gradle file as the applicationId value.

Initialize the provider, this time calling the static method logout.

//Configure and launch the log out
WebAuthProvider.logout(account)
    .start(this, logoutCallback)

//Declare the callback that will receive the result
val logoutCallback = object: Callback<Void?, AuthenticationException> {
    override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) {
        // Failure! Check the exception for details
    }

    override fun onSuccess(result: Void?) {
        // Success! The browser session was cleared
    }
}

The callback will get invoked when the user returns to your application. There are a few scenarios where this may fail:

  • When the device cannot open the URL because it doesn't have any compatible browser application installed. You can check this scenario with error.isBrowserAppNotAvailable.
  • When the user manually closed the browser (e.g. pressing the back key). You can check this scenario with error.isAuthenticationCanceled.

If the returnTo URL is not found in the Allowed Logout URLs of your Auth0 Application, the server will not make the redirection and the browser will remain open.

Changing the Return To URL scheme

This configuration will probably match what you've done for the authentication setup.

WebAuthProvider.logout(account)
    .withScheme("myapp")
    .start(this, logoutCallback)

Customize the Custom Tabs UI

If the device where the app is running has a Custom Tabs compatible Browser, a Custom Tab will be preferred for the logout flow. You can customize the Page Title visibility, the Toolbar color, and the supported Browser applications by using the CustomTabsOptions class.

val ctOptions = CustomTabsOptions.newBuilder()
    .withToolbarColor(R.color.ct_toolbar_color)
    .showTitle(true)
    .build()
 
WebAuthProvider.logout(account)
    .withCustomTabsOptions(ctOptions)
    .start(this, logoutCallback)

Next steps

Learning resources

Check out the Android QuickStart Guide to find out more about the Auth0.Android toolkit and explore our tutorials and sample projects.

Authentication API

The client provides methods to authenticate the user against the Auth0 server.

Create a new instance by passing the account:

val authentication = AuthenticationAPIClient(account)

Note: If your Auth0 account has the "Bot Protection" feature enabled, your requests might be flagged for verification. Read how to handle this scenario on the Bot Protection section.

Login with database connection

authentication
    .login("info@auth0.com", "a secret password", "my-database-connection")
    .start(object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) { }
    })

The default scope used is openid profile email. Regardless of the scopes set to the request, the openid scope is always enforced.

Login using MFA with One Time Password code

This call requires the client to have the MFA Client Grant Type enabled. Check this article to learn how to enable it.

When you sign in to a multifactor authentication enabled connection using the login method, you receive an error standing that MFA is required for that user along with an mfa_token value. Use this value to call loginWithOTP and complete the MFA flow passing the One Time Password from the enrolled MFA code generator app.

authentication
    .loginWithOTP("the mfa token", "123456")
    .start(object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) { }
    })

The default scope used is openid profile email. Regardless of the scopes set to the request, the openid scope is always enforced.

Passwordless Login

This feature requires your Application to have the Passwordless OTP enabled. See this article to learn how to enable it.

Passwordless it's a 2 steps flow:

Step 1: Request the code

authentication
    .passwordlessWithEmail("info@auth0.com", PasswordlessType.CODE, "my-passwordless-connection")
    .start(object: Callback<Void, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

        override fun onSuccess(result: Void?) { }
    })

Step 2: Input the code

authentication
    .loginWithEmail("info@auth0.com", "123456", "my-passwordless-connection")
    .start(object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
       override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

       override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) { }
   })

The default scope used is openid profile email. Regardless of the scopes set to the request, the openid scope is always enforced.

Sign Up with database connection

authentication
    .signUp("info@auth0.com", "a secret password", "my-database-connection")
    .start(object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) { }
    })

The default scope used is openid profile email. Regardless of the scopes set to the request, the openid scope is always enforced.

Get user information

authentication
   .userInfo("user access_token")
   .start(object: Callback<UserProfile, AuthenticationException> {
       override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) { }

       override fun onSuccess(profile: UserProfile) { }
   })

Bot Protection

If you are using the Bot Protection feature and performing database login/signup via the Authentication API, you need to handle the AuthenticationException#isVerificationRequired() error. It indicates that the request was flagged as suspicious and an additional verification step is necessary to log the user in. That verification step is web-based, so you need to use Universal Login to complete it.

val email = "info@auth0.com"
val password = "a secret password"
val realm = "my-database-connection"

val authentication = AuthenticationAPIClient(account)
authentication.login(email, password, realm)
    .start(object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) {
            if (exception.isVerificationRequired()) {
                val params = mapOf("login_hint" to email) // So the user doesn't have to type it again
                WebAuthProvider.login(account)
                    .withConnection(realm)
                    .withParameters(params)
                    .start(LoginActivity.this, object: Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
                        // You might already have a Callback instance defined

                        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) {
                            // Handle error
                        }

                        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) {
                            // Handle WebAuth success
                        }
                    })
            }
            // Handle other errors
        }

        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) {
            // Handle API success
        }
    })

In the case of signup, you can add an additional parameter to make the user land directly on the signup page:

val params = mapOf(
    "login_hint" to email, 
    "screen_hint", "signup"
)

Check out how to set up Universal Login in the Authentication with Universal Login section.

Management API

The client provides a few methods to interact with the Users Management API.

Create a new instance passing the account and an access token with the Management API audience and the right scope:

val users = UsersAPIClient(account, "api access token")

Link users

users
    .link("primary user id", "secondary user token")
    .start(object: Callback<List<UserIdentity>, ManagementException> {
    
        override fun onFailure(exception: ManagementException) { }
    
        override fun onSuccess(identities: List<UserIdentity>) { }
    })

Unlink users

users
    .unlink("primary user id", "secondary user id", "secondary provider")
    .start(object: Callback<List<UserIdentity>, ManagementException> {
    
        override fun onFailure(exception: ManagementException) { }
    
        override fun onSuccess(identities: List<UserIdentity>) { }
    })

Get User Profile

users
    .getProfile("user id")
    .start(object: Callback<UserProfile, ManagementException> {
    
        override fun onFailure(exception: ManagementException) { }
    
        override fun onSuccess(identities: UserProfile) { }
    })

Update User Metadata

val metadata = mapOf(
    "name" to listOf("My", "Name", "Is"),
    "phoneNumber" to "1234567890"
)

users
    .updateMetadata("user id", metadata)
    .start(object: Callback<UserProfile, ManagementException> {
    
        override fun onFailure(exception: ManagementException) { }
    
        override fun onSuccess(identities: UserProfile) { }
    })

In all the cases, the user ID parameter is the unique identifier of the auth0 account instance. i.e. in google-oauth2|123456789 it would be the part after the '|' pipe: 123456789.

Organizations

Organizations is a set of features that provide better support for developers who build and maintain SaaS and Business-to-Business (B2B) applications.

Using Organizations, you can:

  • Represent teams, business customers, partner companies, or any logical grouping of users that should have different ways of accessing your applications, as organizations.
  • Manage their membership in a variety of ways, including user invitation.
  • Configure branded, federated login flows for each organization.
  • Implement role-based access control, such that users can have different roles when authenticating in the context of different organizations.
  • Build administration capabilities into your products, using Organizations APIs, so that those businesses can manage their own organizations.

Note that Organizations is currently only available to customers on our Enterprise and Startup subscription plans.

Log in to an organization

WebAuthProvider.login(account)
    .withOrganization(organizationId)
    .start(this, callback)

Accept user invitations

Users can be invited to your organization via a link. Tapping on the invitation link should open your app. Since invitations links are https only, is recommended that your app supports Android App Links. In Enable Android App Links Support, you will find how to make the Auth0 server publish the Digital Asset Links file required by your application.

When your app gets opened by an invitation link, grab the invitation URL from the received Intent (e.g. in onCreate or onNewIntent) and pass it to .withInvitationUrl():

getIntent()?.data?.let {
    WebAuthProvider.login(account)
        .withInvitationUrl(invitationUrl)
        .start(this, callback)
}

If the URL doesn't contain the expected values, an error will be raised through the provided callback.

Credentials Manager

This library ships with two additional classes that help you manage the Credentials received during authentication.

Basic

The basic version supports asking for Credentials existence, storing them and getting them back. If the credentials have expired and a refresh_token was saved, they are automatically refreshed. The class is called CredentialsManager.

Usage

  1. Instantiate the manager: You'll need an AuthenticationAPIClient instance to renew the credentials when they expire and a Storage object. We provide a SharedPreferencesStorage class that makes use of SharedPreferences to create a file in the application's directory with Context.MODE_PRIVATE mode.
val authentication = AuthenticationAPIClient(account)
val storage = SharedPreferencesStorage(this)
val manager = CredentialsManager(authentication, storage)
  1. Save credentials: The credentials to save must have expires_at and at least an access_token or id_token value. If one of the values is missing when trying to set the credentials, the method will throw a CredentialsManagerException. If you want the manager to successfully renew the credentials when expired you must also request the offline_access scope when logging in in order to receive a refresh_token value along with the rest of the tokens. i.e. Logging in with a database connection and saving the credentials:
authentication
    .login("info@auth0.com", "a secret password", "my-database-connection")
    .setScope("openid email profile offline_access")
    .start(object : Callback<Credentials, AuthenticationException> {
        override fun onFailure(exception: AuthenticationException) {
            // Error
        }
    
        override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) {
            //Save the credentials
            manager.saveCredentials(credentials)
        }
    })

Note: This method has been made thread-safe after version 2.7.0.

  1. Check credentials existence: There are cases were you just want to check if a user session is still valid (i.e. to know if you should present the login screen or the main screen). For convenience, we include a hasValidCredentials method that can let you know in advance if a non-expired token is available without making an additional network call. The same rules of the getCredentials method apply:
val authenticated = manager.hasValidCredentials()
  1. Retrieve credentials: Existing credentials will be returned if they are still valid, otherwise the refresh_token will be used to attempt to renew them. If the expires_at or both the access_token and id_token values are missing, the method will throw a CredentialsManagerException. The same will happen if the credentials have expired and there's no refresh_token available.
manager.getCredentials(object : Callback<Credentials, CredentialsManagerException> {
   override fun onFailure(exception: CredentialsManagerException) {
       // Error
   }

   override fun onSuccess(credentials: Credentials) {
       // Use the credentials
   }
})

Note: In the scenario where the stored credentials have expired and a refresh_token is available, the newly obtained tokens are automatically saved for you by the Credentials Manager. This method has been made thread-safe after version 2.7.0.

  1. Clear credentials: When you want to log the user out:
manager.clearCredentials()

Encryption enforced

This version adds encryption to the data storage. Additionally, in those devices where a Secure Lock Screen has been configured it can require the user to authenticate before letting them obtain the stored credentials. The class is called SecureCredentialsManager.

Usage

The usage is similar to the previous version, with the slight difference that the manager now requires a valid android Context as shown below:

val authentication = AuthenticationAPIClient(account)
val storage = SharedPreferencesStorage(this)
val manager = SecureCredentialsManager(this, authentication, storage)

Requiring Authentication

You can require the user authentication to obtain credentials. This will make the manager prompt the user with the device's configured Lock Screen, which they must pass correctly in order to obtain the credentials. This feature is only available on devices where the user has setup a secured Lock Screen (PIN, Pattern, Password or Fingerprint).

To enable authentication you must call the requireAuthentication method passing a valid Activity context, a request code that represents the authentication call, and the title and description to display in the Lock Screen. As seen in the snippet below, you can leave these last two parameters with null to use the system's default title and description. It's only safe to call this method before the Activity is started.

//You might want to define a constant with the Request Code
companion object {
    const val AUTH_REQ_CODE = 111
}

manager.requireAuthentication(this, AUTH_REQ_CODE, null, null)

When the above conditions are met and the manager requires the user authentication, it will use the activity context to launch the Lock Screen activity and wait for its result. If your activity is a subclass of ComponentActivity, this will be handled automatically for you internally. Otherwise, your activity must override the onActivityResult method and pass the request code and result code to the manager's checkAuthenticationResult method to verify if this request was successful or not.

 override fun onActivityResult(requestCode: Int, resultCode: Int, data: Intent?) {
    if (manager.checkAuthenticationResult(requestCode, resultCode)) {
        return
    }
    super.onActivityResult(requestCode, resultCode, data)
}

If the manager consumed the event, it will return true and later invoke the callback's onSuccess with the decrypted credentials.

Handling exceptions

In the event that something happened while trying to save or retrieve the credentials, a CredentialsManagerException will be thrown. These are some of the expected failure scenarios:

  • Invalid Credentials format or values. e.g. when it's missing the access_token, the id_token or the expires_at values.
  • Tokens have expired but no refresh_token is available to perform a refresh credentials request.
  • Device's Lock Screen security settings have changed (e.g. the PIN code was changed). Even when hasCredentials returns true, the encryption keys will be deemed invalid and until saveCredentials is called again it won't be possible to decrypt any previously existing content, since they keys used back then are not the same as the new ones.
  • Device is not compatible with some of the algorithms required by the SecureCredentialsManager class. This is considered a catastrophic event and might happen when the OEM has modified the Android ROM removing some of the officially included algorithms. Nevertheless, it can be checked in the exception instance itself by calling isDeviceIncompatible. By doing so you can decide the fallback for storing the credentials, such as using the regular CredentialsManager.

Networking client customization

This library provides the ability to customize the behavior of the networking client for common configurations, as well the ability to define and use your own networking client implementation.

The Auth0 class can be configured with a NetworkingClient, which will be used when making requests. You can configure the default client with custom timeout values, any headers that should be sent on all requests, and whether to log request/response info (for non-production debugging purposes only). For more advanced configuration, you can provide your own implementation of NetworkingClient.

Timeout configuration

val netClient = DefaultClient(
    connectTimeout = 30,
    readTimeout = 30
)

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_DOMAIN}")
account.networkingClient = netClient

Logging configuration

val netClient = DefaultClient(
    enableLogging = true
)

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_DOMAIN}")
account.networkingClient = netClient

Set additional headers for all requests

val netClient = DefaultClient(
    defaultHeaders = mapOf("{HEADER-NAME}" to "{HEADER-VALUE}")
)

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_DOMAIN}")
account.networkingClient = netClient

Advanced configuration

For more advanced configuration of the networking client, you can provide a custom implementation of NetworkingClient. This may be useful when you wish to reuse your own networking client, configure a proxy, etc.

class CustomNetClient : NetworkingClient {
    override fun load(url: String, options: RequestOptions): ServerResponse {
        // Create and execute the request to the specified URL with the given options
        val response = // ...
            
        // Return a ServerResponse from the received response data
        return ServerResponse(responseCode, responseBody, responseHeaders)        
    }
}

val account = Auth0("{YOUR_CLIENT_ID}", "{YOUR_DOMAIN}")
account.networkingClient = netClient

FAQ

Why is the Android Lint error 'InvalidPackage' considered a warning?

When building the project with build, an error appeared regarding an invalid package on the okio dependency. This snippet is in the build.gradle file so that the build runs fine:

android {
    //...
    lintOptions {
       warning 'InvalidPackage'
    }
}

ref: square/okio#58 (comment)

Why do I need to declare Manifest Placeholders for the Auth0 domain and scheme?

The library internally declares a RedirectActivity in its Android Manifest file. While this approach prevents the developer from adding an activity declaration to their application's Android Manifest file, it requires the use of Manifest Placeholders.

Alternatively, you can re-declare the RedirectActivity in the AndroidManifest.xml file with your own intent-filter so it overrides the library's default. If you do this then the manifestPlaceholders don't need to be set as long as the activity contains the tools:node="replace" like in the snippet below.

<manifest xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
    package="your.app.package">
    <application android:theme="@style/AppTheme">

        <!-- ... -->

        <activity
            android:name="com.auth0.android.provider.RedirectActivity"
            tools:node="replace">
            <intent-filter>
                <action android:name="android.intent.action.VIEW" />

                <category android:name="android.intent.category.DEFAULT" />
                <category android:name="android.intent.category.BROWSABLE" />

                <data
                    android:host="@string/com_auth0_domain"
                    android:pathPrefix="/android/${applicationId}/callback"
                    android:scheme="https" />
            </intent-filter>
        </activity>

        <!-- ... -->

    </application>
</manifest>

Recall that if you request a different scheme, you must replace the above android:scheme property value and initialize the provider with the new scheme. Read this section to learn more.

Is the Web Authentication module setup optional?

If you don't plan to use the Web Authentication feature, you will notice that the compiler will still prompt you to provide the manifestPlaceholders values, since the RedirectActivity included in this library will require them, and the Gradle tasks won't be able to run without them.

Re-declare the activity manually with tools:node="remove" in your app's Android Manifest in order to make the manifest merger remove it from the final manifest file. Additionally, one more unused activity can be removed from the final APK by using the same process. A complete snippet to achieve this is:

<activity
    android:name="com.auth0.android.provider.AuthenticationActivity"
    tools:node="remove"/>
<!-- Optional: Remove RedirectActivity -->
<activity
    android:name="com.auth0.android.provider.RedirectActivity"
    tools:node="remove"/>

Unit testing with JUnit 4 or JUnit 5

Handling Method getMainLooper in android.os.Looper not mocked errors

Your unit tests might break with Caused by: java.lang.RuntimeException: Method getMainLooper in android.os.Looper not mocked due to the Looper being used internally by this library. There are two options to handle this:

  1. Use Robolectric Shadows - see this test for an example
  2. If your project does not use Robolectric and uses JUnit 4, you can create a Rule that you can add to your unit test:
import com.auth0.android.request.internal.CommonThreadSwitcher
import com.auth0.android.request.internal.ThreadSwitcher
import org.junit.rules.TestWatcher
import org.junit.runner.Description

public class CommonThreadSwitcherRule : TestWatcher() {
    override fun starting(description: Description) {
        super.starting(description)
        CommonThreadSwitcher.getInstance().setDelegate(object : ThreadSwitcher {
            override fun mainThread(runnable: Runnable) {
                runnable.run()
            }

            override fun backgroundThread(runnable: Runnable) {
                runnable.run()
            }
        })
    }

    override fun finished(description: Description) {
        super.finished(description)
        CommonThreadSwitcher.getInstance().setDelegate(null)
    }
}

See this test for an example of it being used.

  1. If you use JUnit 5 then you can create an Extension similar to the previous Rule for JUnit 4:
import com.auth0.android.request.internal.CommonThreadSwitcher
import com.auth0.android.request.internal.ThreadSwitcher
import org.junit.jupiter.api.extension.AfterEachCallback
import org.junit.jupiter.api.extension.BeforeEachCallback
import org.junit.jupiter.api.extension.ExtensionContext

class CommonThreadSwitcherExtension : BeforeEachCallback, AfterEachCallback {

    override fun beforeEach(context: ExtensionContext?) {
        CommonThreadSwitcher.getInstance().setDelegate(object : ThreadSwitcher {
            override fun mainThread(runnable: Runnable) {
                runnable.run()
            }

            override fun backgroundThread(runnable: Runnable) {
                runnable.run()
            }
        })
    }

    override fun afterEach(context: ExtensionContext?) {
        CommonThreadSwitcher.getInstance().setDelegate(null)
    }

}

Handling SSL errors

You might encounter errors similar to PKIX path building failed: sun.security.provider.certpath.SunCertPathBuilderException: unable to find valid certification path to requested target, which means that you need to set up your unit tests in a way that ignores or trusts all SSL certificates. In that case, you may have to implement your own NetworkingClient so that you can supply your own SSLSocketFactory and X509TrustManager, and use that in creating your Auth0 object. See the DefaultClient class for an idea on how to extend NetworkingClient.

Proguard

The rules should be applied automatically if your application is using minifyEnabled = true. If you want to include them manually check the proguard directory. By default you should at least use the following files:

  • proguard-okio.pro
  • proguard-gson.pro

What is Auth0?

Auth0 helps you to:

  • Add authentication with multiple authentication sources, either social like Google, Facebook, Microsoft Account, LinkedIn, GitHub, Twitter, Box, Salesforce, among others, or enterprise identity systems like Windows Azure AD, Google Apps, Active Directory, ADFS or any SAML Identity Provider.
  • Add authentication through more traditional username/password databases.
  • Add support for linking different user accounts with the same user.
  • Support for generating signed Json Web Tokens to call your APIs and flow the user identity securely.
  • Analytics of how, when and where users are logging in.
  • Pull data from other sources and add it to the user profile, through JavaScript rules.

Create a free Auth0 Account

  1. Go to Auth0 and click Sign Up.
  2. Use Google, GitHub or Microsoft Account to login.

Issue Reporting

If you have found a bug or if you have a feature request, please report them at this repository issues section. Please do not report security vulnerabilities on the public GitHub issue tracker. The Responsible Disclosure Program details the procedure for disclosing security issues.

Author

Auth0

License

This project is licensed under the MIT license. See the LICENSE file for more info.