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Enumerated attributes with I18n and ActiveRecord/Mongoid support

README.md

Enumerize TravisCI Gemnasium

Enumerated attributes with I18n and ActiveRecord/Mongoid/MongoMapper support

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'enumerize'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install enumerize

Usage

Basic:

class User
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: [:male, :female]
end

Note that enumerized values are just identificators so if you want to use multi-word, etc. values you should use I18n feature.

ActiveRecord:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: [:male, :female], default: lambda { |user| SexIdentifier.sex_for_name(user.name).to_sym }

  enumerize :role, in: [:user, :admin], default: :user
end

Mongoid:

class User
  include Mongoid::Document
  extend Enumerize

  field :role
  enumerize :role, in: [:user, :admin], default: :user
end

MongoMapper:

class User
  include MongoMapper::Document
  extend Enumerize

  key :role
  enumerize :role, in: [:user, :admin], default: :user
end

I18n:

en:
  enumerize:
    user:
      sex:
        male: "Male"
        female: "Female"

or if you use sex attribute across several models you can use defaults scope:

en:
  enumerize:
    defaults:
      sex:
        male: "Male"
        female: "Female"

You can also pass i18n_scope option to specify scope (or array of scopes) storring the translations. Note that i18n_scope option does not accept scope as array:

class Person
  extend Enumerize
  extend ActiveModel::Naming

  enumerize :sex, in: %w[male female], i18n_scope: "sex"
  enumerize :color, in: %w[black white], i18n_scope: ["various.colors", "colors"]
end

# localization file
en:
  sex:
    male: "Male"
    female: "Female"
  various:
    colors:
      black: "Black"
  colors:
    white: "White"

Note that if you want to use I18n feature with plain Ruby object don't forget to extend it with ActiveModel::Naming:

class User
  extend Enumerize
  extend ActiveModel::Naming
end

get attribute value:

@user.sex_text # or @user.sex.text

get all values for enumerized attribute:

User.sex.values # or User.enumerized_attributes[:sex].values

use it with forms (it supports :only and :except options):

<%= form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.select :sex, User.sex.options %>
<% end %>

Boolean methods:

user.sex = :male
user.sex.male? #=> true
user.sex.female? #=> false

Predicate methods:

class User
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: %w(male female), predicates: true
end

user = User.new

user.male?   # => false
user.female? # => false

user.sex = 'male'

user.male?   # => true
user.female? # => false

Using prefix:

class User
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: %w(male female), predicates: { prefix: true }
end

user = User.new
user.sex = 'female'
user.sex_female? # => true

Use :only and :except options to specify what values create predicate methods for.

To make some attributes shared across different classes it's possible to define them in a separate module and then include it into classes:

module PersonEnumerations
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: %w[male female]
end

class Person
  include PersonEnumerations
end

class User
  include PersonEnumerations
end

It's also possible to store enumerized attribute value using custom values (e.g. integers). You can pass a hash as :in option to achieve this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :role, in: {:user => 1, :admin => 2}
end

user = User.new
user.role = :user
user.role #=> 'user'
user.role_value #=> 1

User.role.find_value(:user).value #=> 1
User.role.find_value(:admin).value #=> 2

ActiveRecord scopes:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend Enumerize
  enumerize :sex, :in => [:male, :female], scope: true
  enumerize :status, :in => { active: 1, blocked: 2 }, scope: :having_status
end

User.with_sex(:female)
# SELECT "users".* FROM "users" WHERE "users"."sex" IN ('female')

User.without_sex(:male)
# SELECT "users".* FROM "users" WHERE "users"."sex" NOT IN ('male')

User.having_status(:blocked).with_sex(:male, :female)
# SELECT "users".* FROM "users" WHERE "users"."status" IN (2) AND "users"."sex" IN ('male', 'female')

Array-like attributes with plain ruby objects:

class User
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :interests, in: [:music, :sports], multiple: true
end

user = User.new
user.interests << :music
user.interests << :sports

and with ActiveRecord:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  extend Enumerize

  serialize :interests, Array
  enumerize :interests, in: [:music, :sports], multiple: true
end

SimpleForm

If you are using SimpleForm gem you don't need to specify input type (:select by default) and collection:

<%= simple_form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :sex %>
<% end %>

and if you want it as radio buttons:

<%= simple_form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :sex, :as => :radio_buttons %>
<% end %>

Formtastic

If you are using Formtastic gem you also don't need to specify input type (:select by default) and collection:

<%= semantic_form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :sex %>
<% end %>

and if you want it as radio buttons:

<%= semantic_form_for @user do |f| %>
  <%= f.input :sex, :as => :radio %>
<% end %>

RSpec

Also you can use builtin RSpec matcher:

class User
  extend Enumerize

  enumerize :sex, in: [:male, :female], default: :male
end

describe User do
  it { should enumerize(:sex).in(:male, :female) }
  it { should enumerize(:sex).in(:male, :female).with_default(:male) }
end

Minitest with Shoulda

You can use the RSpec matcher with shoulda in your tests by adding two lines in your test_helper.rb inside class ActiveSupport::TestCase definition:

class ActiveSupport::TestCase
  ActiveRecord::Migration.check_pending!

  require 'enumerize/integrations/rspec'
  extend Enumerize::Integrations::RSpec

  ...
end

Other Integrations

Enumerize integrates with the following automatically:

Contributing

  1. Fork it
  2. Create your feature branch (git checkout -b my-new-feature)
  3. Commit your changes (git commit -am 'Added some feature')
  4. Push to the branch (git push origin my-new-feature)
  5. Create new Pull Request
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