Resource-oriented HTTP client for .net
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README.md

README.md

Everest

A resource-oriented HTTP client for .net

Install

via NuGet:

PM> Install-Package Everest

Usage

var client = new Everest.RestClient();

// GET http://www.google.com
var homePage = client.Get("http://www.google.com");

// GET http://www.google.com/search?q=everest+http+client
var searchResults = homePage.Get("search?q=everest+http+client");

...

Resource-Oriented?

To use Everest, create a RestClient:

var client = new Everest.RestClient();

A RestClient is a Resource, therefore it can be used to make requests, such as "Get" requests:

var homePage = client.Get("http://www.google.com");

The response (homePage) is a Response, which itself is also a Resource, so we can call "Get" on that too, to get a new Response, relative to the URI that responded to the first request:

// GET http://www.google.com/search?q=everest+http+client
var searchResults = homePage.Get("search?q=everest+http+client");

All requests return Responses, so we can do this over and over.

Resource API

Everest requests are ultimately dispatched by calling the "Send" method on a Resource, to get a Response:

namespace Everest
{
    public interface Resource
    {
        ...
        Response Send(HttpMethod method, string uri, BodyContent body, params PipelineOption[] overridingPipelineOptions);
        ...
    }
}

Most of the time, you have a particular verb in mind when you make an HTTP request, so you'll want the convenient Resource API extension methods:

namespace Everest
{
    public static class ResourceApi
    {
        ...
        public static Response Get(this Resource resource, string uri, params PipelineOption[] pipelineOptions)
        {
            return resource.Send(HttpMethod.Get, uri, null, pipelineOptions);
        }
        ...
    }
}

Pipelines

When you make HTTP requests, you often need to set specific parameters (such as request headers), or handle responses in a particular way. For anything beyond the request URI and body, Everest allows the request and/or response handling to be tweaked, using pipeline options:

using Everest;
using Everest.Headers;

...

var client = new RestClient(new RequestHeader("X-Requested-With", "Everest"));

RequestHeader is one example of a PipelineOption, which are used to customise the way Everest handles requests and responses.

Pipeline Options

PipelineOption is a marker interface implemented by anything that can customise a request or its response handling.

Pipeline options can be applied to all requests by passing them to the RestClient constructor:

var options = new PipelineOption[] { ExpectStatus.OK, new RequestHeader("foo", "bar") }

new RestClient(options);

...or applied to a single request at a time (often overriding existing options):

new RestClient().Get(url, new RequestHeader("foo", "baz"))

The following pipeline options can be used to customise request/response behaviour:

Body Content

An implementation of BodyContent can be passed into any request that takes a payload (e.g. POST/PUT):

namespace Everest.Content
{
    public interface BodyContent
    {
        Stream AsStream();
        string MediaType { get; }
    }
}

A couple of implementations of BodyContent should come in handy:

Status Codes

By default, Everest throws an exception if the response status code is in the range 400-599.

You can override the acceptable response status code:

// Create a client that doesn't usually complain about errors
client = new RestClient(ExpectStatus.IgnoreStatus)

// GET request, expecting a 404
client.Get("foo", ExpectStatus.NotFound)

// POST request, expecting a 201
client.Post("foo", "body", new ExpectStatus(HttpStatusCode.Created))

Redirection

By default, Everest will automatically follow redirects. Change that behaviour with the AutoRedirect option:

client.Post("/foos", "body", AutoRedirect.DoNotAutoRedirect)

For security, Authorization headers are not sent in requests following automatic redirects. This can be overridden:

client.Put("/foos/1", "body", AutoRedirect.AutoRedirectAndForwardAuthorizationHeader)

Builder API

Given a resource, Resource.With(params PipelineOption[] options) returns a new client with overridden default options:

var client = new RestClient("http://www.example.com");
var authenticatedAjaxClient = client.With(new BasicAuth("user", "pass"))
                                    .With(new RequestHeader("X-Requested-With", "ajax"));

Everest make conservatories in the UK

I know, sorry. I work with a guy called Julian Everett, who is an expert in the art of REST. This project is named (nearly) after him.