Interface designed for Shopify apps created with Laravel
PHP
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Latest commit 8754ce1 Aug 12, 2015

readme.md

Laravel / Shopify API Wrapper

An easy-to-use PHP package to communicate with Shopify's API in Laravel.

##Installation ####Require rocket-code/shopify in composer.json

Add "rocket-code/shopify" in your "require" object. With a blank Laravel install, it will look something like this:

For Laravel 5, use "rocket-code/shopify": "~2.0". For Laravel 4, use "rocket-code/shopify": "~1.0".

	"require": {
		"laravel/framework": "4.2.*",
		"rocket-code/shopify": "~1.0"
	}

####Add the Service Provider In app/config/app.php, add RocketCode\Shopify\ShopifyServiceProvider to the end of the providers array.

##Setting Up To begin, use App::make() to grab an instance of the API class.

$sh = App::make('ShopifyAPI');

####Loading API Credentials Simply pass an array with the following keys (and filled-in values) to prepare. Not all values need to be passed at once; you can call the setup() method as many times as you'd like; it will only accept the following 4 keys, and overwrite a values if it's already set.

$sh->setup(['API_KEY' => '', 'API_SECRET' => '', 'SHOP_DOMAIN' => '', 'ACCESS_TOKEN' => '']);

#####Shortcut: Pass the setup array as the second argument in App::make():

$sh = App::make('ShopifyAPI', ['API_KEY' => '', 'API_SECRET' => '', 'SHOP_DOMAIN' => '', 'ACCESS_TOKEN' => '']);

That's it! You're ready to make some API calls.

##Finding the Install URL After setting up with at least SHOP_DOMAIN & API_KEY, call installURL() with an array of permissions (the app's Scope):

$sh->installURL(['permissions' => array('write_orders', 'write_products')]);

You may also pass a redirect URL per the redirect_uri parameter as described by the Shopify API Docs

$sh->installURL(['permissions' => array('write_orders', 'write_products'), 'redirect' => 'http://myapp.com/success']);

##Authentication / Getting OAuth Access Token In order to make Authenticated requests, the Access Token must be passed as a header in each request. This package will automatically do that for you, but you must first authenticate your app on each store (as the user installs it), and save the Access Token.

Once the user accesses the Install URL and clicks the Install button, they will be redirected back to your app with data in the Query String.

After setting up with at least SHOP_DOMAIN, API_KEY, & API_SECRET, call getAccessToken() with the code passed back in the URL. Laravel makes this easy:

$code = Input::get('code');
$sh = App::make('ShopifyAPI', ['API_KEY' => '', 'API_SECRET' => '', 'SHOP_DOMAIN' => '']);

try
{
	$accessToken = $sh->getAccessToken($code);
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
	echo '<pre>Error: ' . $e->getMessage() . '</pre>';
}

// Save $accessToken

####Verifying OAuth Data Shopify returns a hashed value to validate the data against. To validate (recommended before calling getAccessToken()), utilize verifyRequest().

try
{
	$verify = $sh->verifyRequest(Input::all());
	if ($verify)
	{
		$code = Input::get('code');
		$accessToken = $sh->getAccessToken($code);
	}
	else
	{
		// Issue with data
	}

}
catch (Exception $e)
{
	echo '<pre>Error: ' . $e->getMessage() . '</pre>';
}


	

verifyRequest() returns TRUE when data is valid, otherwise FALSE. It throws an Exception in two cases: If the timestamp generated by Shopify and your server are more than an hour apart, or if the argument passed is not an array or URL-encoded string of key/values.

If you would like to skip the timestamp check (not recommended unless you cannot correct your server's time), you can pass TRUE as a second argument to verifyRequest() and timestamps will be ignored:

$verify = $sh->verifyRequest(Input::all(), TRUE);

Private Apps

The API Wrapper does not distinguish between private and public apps. In order to utilize it with a private app, set up everything as you normally would, replacing the OAuth Access Token with the private app's Password.

##Calling the API Once set up, simply pass the data you need to the call() method.

$result = $sh->call($args);

####call() Parameters The parameters listed below allow you to set required values for an API call as well as override additional default values.

  • METHOD: The HTTP method to use for your API call. Different endpoints require different methods.
    • Default: GET
  • URL: The URL of the API Endpoint to call.
    • Default: / (not an actual endpoint)
  • HEADERS: An array of additional Headers to be sent
    • Default: Empty array(). Headers that are automatically sent include:
      • Accept
      • Content-Type
      • charset
      • X-Shopify-Access-Token
  • CHARSET: Change the charset if necessary
    • Default: UTF-8
  • DATA: An array of data being sent with the call. For example, $args['DATA'] = array('product' => $product); For an /admin/products.json product creation POST.
    • Default: Empty array()
  • RETURNARRAY: Set this to TRUE to return data in array() format. FALSE will return a stdClass object.
    • Default: FALSE
  • ALLDATA: Set this to TRUE if you would like all error and cURL info returned along with your API data (good for debugging). Data will be available in $result->_ERROR and $result->_INFO, or $result['_ERROR'] and $result['_INFO'], depending if you are having it returned as an object or array. Recommended to be set to FALSE in production.
    • Default: FALSE
  • FAILONERROR: The value passed to cURL's CURLOPT_FAILONERROR setting. TRUE will cause the API Wrapper to throw an Exception if the HTTP code is >= 400. FALSE in combination with ALLDATA set to TRUE will give you more debug information.
    • Default: TRUE

##Some Examples Assume that $sh has already been set up as documented above.

####Listing Products

try
{

	$call = $sh->call(['URL' => 'products.json', 'METHOD' => 'GET', 'DATA' => ['limit' => 5, 'published_status' => 'any']]);
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
	$call = $e->getMessage();
}

echo '<pre>';
var_dump($call);
echo '</pre>';

$call will either contain a stdClass object with products or an Exception error message.

####Creating a snippet from a Laravel View

$testData = ['name' => 'Foo', 'location' => 'Bar'];
$view = (string) View::make('snippet', $testData);

$themeID = 12345678;

try
{
	$call = $sh->call(['URL' => '/admin/themes/' . $themeID . '/assets.json', 'METHOD' => 'PUT', 'DATA' => ['asset' => ['key' => 'snippets/test.liquid', 'value' => $view] ] ]);
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
	$call = $e->getMessage();
}

echo '<pre>';
var_dump($call);
echo '</pre>';

####Performing operations on multiple shops The setup() method makes changing the current shop simple.

$apiKey = '123';
$apiSecret = '456';

$sh = App::make('ShopifyAPI', ['API_KEY' => $apiKey, 'API_SECRET' => $apiSecret]);

$shops = array(
		'my-shop.myshopify.com'		=> 'abc',
		'your-shop.myshopify.com'	=> 'def',
		'another.myshopify.com'		=> 'ghi'
		);
		
foreach($shops as $domain => $access)
{
	$sh->setup(['SHOP_DOMAIN' => $domain, 'ACCESS_TOKEN'' => $access]);
	// $sh->call(), etc

}