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A simple Azure Functions function app written in TypeScript.
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README.md

Azure Functions ❤️'s TypeScript

This is an example of a simple function app written in TypeScript. Most of the contents come from default templates that are available through both the VS Code extension for Azure Functions and Azure Functions Core Tools. The HelloWorldNpm function is modified from a default template to import and use an npm module.

Prerequisites

  • Install latest Active LTS version of Node.js
  • Install latest azure-functions-core-tools if you do not already have it.
    • npm install -g azure-functions-core-tools
  • Run npm install from project root to install dev dependencies.

The basics

Build

To build this Function app run npm run build. (Note that npm start and F5 already include a build step.) If you are using binding extensions, the necessary binaries are also installed.

On build, all TypeScript code in the root directory is transpiled into JavaScript and placed in an output directory called dist, as configured in tsconfig.json by outDir. We don't advise changing this configuration. The default scriptFile property of each function assumes that the transpiled JavaScript output will be located in dist (example: ../dist/FunctionName/index.js).

Run

To run your code, use npm start. If you are using VS Code, you can press F5 to build and run instead.

This command builds your Function app and starts the Azure Functions host to run your code. If you only want to run your built code, you can run func start or npm run start:host.

Develop

npm run test can be implemented to test your code. To ignore specific files and folders when deploying, add them to .funcignore.

Deploy

To prepare your function app for deployment, use npm run build:production. If you are using VS Code, deploy by clicking Deploy to Function App. If you already have a deployed Function app in Azure and want to update its contents, you can also use func azure functionapp publish <FunctionAppName>.

Learn More

If you are getting started with Azure Functions, you can follow this tutorial to create and deploy your first JavaScript function. We recommend that you use Visual Studio Code and the Azure Functions extension.

The Azure Functions developer guide and the JavaScript-specific developer guide are good resources to gain an understanding of more Azure Functions concepts.

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