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Overview

Facet is an open-source live coding system for algorithmic music and synthesis. With a code editor in the browser and a pair of NodeJS servers running locally on your machine, Facet can generate and sequence audio, MIDI, OSC, and image data.

Facet runs on MacOS, Linux, and Windows.

Installation and getting started

  1. Download and install Node.js (must be v14 or greater) and npm: https://www.npmjs.com/get-npm
  2. Download and install SoX as a command line tool (the latest version is 14.4.2): http://sox.sourceforge.net/ If using homebrew: brew install sox should work. If running on Windows: you need to modify your Path environment variable so that SoX can be run from the command line. Ultimately you need to be able to run the command sox from the command line and verify that it's installed.
  3. Download or clone the Facet repository. If you download it, make sure that the repository name is exactly facet and NOT facet-main.
  4. In a terminal, navigate to the root of the Facet repository, and run npm install.
  5. After the previous command completes, run npm run facet. This will start the servers that run in the background for generating and patterns and keeping time. If running on Windows: Windows has a firewall by default for local connections (on the same private network), and it needs to be disabled, or you can manually allow the connection via the confirmation dialog from the Windows firewall system when starting up the servers.
  6. In a browser tab (Firefox or Chrome work best), navigate to http://localhost:1124. This is the browser-based code editor which can also handle stereo audio playback.
  7. Copy this command into the code editor in the browser: $('test').sine(100).play(); Move your cursor so it's on the line. Hit [ctrl + enter] to run the command. The code editor application will always briefly highlights to illustrate what command(s) ran. You should hear a sine wave playing through your browser tab. Hit [ctrl + .] or [ctrl + /] (Windows) to stop.

Facet commands

Syntax

Facet commands are based entirely around JavaScript, using a class called a FacetPattern. In order to produce audio or MIDI output, create an instance of a FacetPattern, and run some methods:

new FacetPattern('example').sine(100).play();

There is a shorthand for creating a new FacetPattern instance:

$('example').sine(100).play();

Some FacetPatterns might contain other FacetPatterns. The most outer-facing one must have a name via the above method $(), but other FacetPatterns inside the code can use a separate, more concise shorthand, _:

$('example').sine(100).times(_.sine(100)).play();

There are lots of methods to generate, translate, and orchestrate playback on FacetPattern data:

$('example').sine(100).times(random()).play(); // each time you run ^, the same sine wave at a different volume

Certain operations (e.g. sometimes(), iter(), slices(), mix(), run()) allow you to supply functions as arguments:

$('example').iter(16,()=>{this.append(_.randsamp('808').speed(10))}).play(); // stitches together 16 random samples, each playing at 10x normal speed

UI controls in the browser

Below the text editor, there are several UI elements which control the servers running in the background. Moving from left to right:

  • Server connection status indicator (green = online; red = offline)
  • CPU% indicator
  • Slider for setting the BPM of the global transport (note: when the .bpm() operation runs, this value is updated automatically)
  • MIDI output selector / refresh button
  • ■ = stop playback
  • ⊖ = stop regenerating patterns but continue playback
  • ↻ = restart system (in case it becomes unresponsive)
  • 🔉 = toggle browser sound on / off

Key commands

  • Run command(s): [ctrl + enter] or [ctrl + r]. All commands not separated by multiple newlines will run together.
  • Stop command(s): [ctrl + ']. All commands not separated by multiple newlines will be stopped, if they are currently running.
  • Keep command(s): [ctrl + ;]. All commands not separated by multiple newlines will continue to play back as-is, without regenerating.
  • Once command(s): [ctrl + \]. All commands not separated by multiple newlines will play back once and not regenerate.
  • Stop all playback: [ctrl + .] or [ctrl + /]
  • Stop regenerating all patterns: [ctrl + ,]
  • Autocomplete / list methods: [ctrl + space]. This will list all available methods including their arguments in a dropdown menu, filtered by the text preceding the cursor position. If only one matching method is found, it will autocomplete that method.
  • Autoformat code: [ctrl + f]

Running "npm run facet"

When you run the npm run facet command in the terminal, the following sequence of events occurs:

A server, known as the process manager, starts up on http://localhost:5831. This server is responsible for managing the startup and shutdown of the two servers listed below:

  1. The transport server starts up on http://localhost:3211. This server is responsible for handling the timing and playback of audio, MIDI, and OSC events.

  2. The pattern generator server starts up on http://localhost:1123. This server listens to requests from the text editor UI in the browser located at http://localhost:1124 and interprets those commands into data. If the pattern is intended to be played back as audio, a corresponding .wav file will be stored in the tmp/ subdirectory in the Facet repo. Otherwise, if the pattern is intended for MIDI or OSC output, the data will be posted directly to the transport server.

Running Facet with Max / Max for Live

It is possible to do audio playback with Facet directly in Max or Max for Live. In that case, turn off browser sound playback by toggling off the "sound" icon in the bottom-right of the code editor. Your selected preference for whether the browser should handle sound playback will persist between sessions. You can change back and forth any time.

The necessary Max patchers for sound playback are included in this repo.

If running Max: the facet.maxpat patcher has 4 individual channels of audio output plus a fifth outlet for passing OSC commands into your patcher.

If running Max for Live: the facet.axmd and facet_4ch.amxd Max for Live devices allow for stereo and 4 channel audio outputs in Ableton Live, respectively. To access the third and fourth channels of facet_4ch.amxd, create a second track and select input channels 3/4 from the input track where facet_4ch.amxd is running.

Configuration for Max / Max for Live

  1. Open Max, or if using Max for Live, click the Edit Button to launch the Max Editor. In the Max navbar, go to > Options > File Preferences, click "Add Path", and add the facet directory (the folder that contains this file). Make sure that the Subfolders checkbox is checked.
  2. If using Max: Create a new patcher, and add a "facet" object.
  3. If using Max for Live: move the max/facet.amxd and max/facet_4ch.amxd files from this directory to where you store your Max for Live Audio Effect devices. Drop an instance of facet.axmd into a track in a Live set.

Variables

mousex / mousey

Both mousex and mousey, as floating-point number representations of your cursor's position in the browser window, are available for use in commands, e.g.:

$('example').sine(100).times(mousey).play(); // cursor y position controls volume every time the code runs

notevalues

There are 128 notevalues variables, corresponding to divisions of 1 whole note. A whole note is n1, a half note is n2, etc... up to n128.

bpm

The variable bpm (representing the current BPM in the Facet transport when the FacetPattern is generated) is available for use in commands as well.

bars

The variable bars (representing how many loops have occurred since the time the server was started) is available for use in commands as well. This is especially useful with the modulo % operator, e.g.: bars%4, which could be either 0, 1, 2, or 3, depending on how many loops have occurred.

Sample rate

You can change the sample rate for the audio generated and played back with Facet by modifying SAMPLE_RATE in js/config.js to whatever integer you want.

In Facet commands, you can use the constant SAMPLE_RATE to refer to the configured sample rate, which is useful when you want to do something for a specific number of seconds. The constant NYQUIST refers to the Nyquist frequency which is SAMPLE_RATE/2.

For example: $('example').noise(SAMPLE_RATE).play(); // generate and continually play back exactly 1 second of noise

Global event resolution

By default, Facet checks every 10 milliseconds whether it needs to fire any events that produce output, such as playing audio, MIDI, or osc. You can change EVENT_RESOLUTION_MS in js/config.js to set a different integer value. Slower speeds (e.g. 20 = 20ms) will produce less tightly-timed events but can help make it possible for Facet to run on computers with less CPU resources, at the expense of slight timing accuracy. Faster speeds (e.g. 4 = 4ms) will produce tighter event scheduling but can overload computers with less CPU resources.

Command reference

Outputs

Facet can synthesize and orchestrate the playback of multiple FacetPatterns simultaneously, producing audio, MIDI, or OSC output. By default, patterns will continually regenerate each loop. In order to only regenerate every n loops, use the .every() method. In order to continue playing a pattern and not regenerate, use the .keep() method. In order to only play back once, use the .once() method.

Audio output

  • channel ( channels )
    • Facet ultimately creates wav files that can have any number of channels. The .channel() method (and equivalent channels() method) allow you to route the output of a FacetPattern onto the specified channel(s) in the channels input array. NOTE: CPU will also increase as the total number of channels increases.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').channel(1).play(); // first channel only
      • $('example').randsamp('808').channels([1,3]).play(); // second channel only
      • $('example').randsamp('808').channel(_.from([9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16]).shuffle().reduce(ri(1,8))).play(); // play on a random number of channels from 9-16

  • pan ( PanningFacetPattern, pan_mode = 0 )
    • dynamically moves the FacetPattern between however many channels are specified in a seperate .channels() call. Without a call to .channels(), it will default to spatially positioning the FacetPattern between channels 1 and 2.
    • the values in PanningFacetPattern should be between -1 and 1. Values beyond that will be clipped to the -1 - 1 range. A value of -1 will hard-pan the sound to the first active channel that is set via a .channels() call (or defaulting to stereo). A value of 1 will hard-pan the sound to the last active channel. Values between -1 and 1 will crossfade between all the specified active channels.
    • the default pan_mode of 0 means that the panning moves smoothly between channels, e.g., channels adjacent to the selected full-volume channel will have some signal bleeding into them. Switching the pan_mode to 1 makes the panning work in a discrete manner, where only one channel has a signal in it at any given time, and there is no bleed between channels.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.ramp(1,0,n1)).pan(_.sine(1,n1)).play(); // no channels are specified; defaults to stereo panning
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.ramp(1,0,n1)).channels([1,2,4]).pan(_.sine(1,n1)).play(); // pans the noise smoothly around channels 1, 2, and 4
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.ramp(1,0,n1)).channels([1,2,4]).pan(_.sine(1,n1),1).play(); // hard-pans the noise discretely between channels 1, 2, and 4

  • play ( PlaybackFacetPattern )
    • plays the FacetPattern as audio through an open "facet" abstraction in Max or Max for Live, at however many positions are specified in PlaybackFacetPattern, as the global transport loops through a whole note.
    • PlaybackFacetPattern should contain floating-point numbers between 0 and 1, corresponding to the relative point in the transport between 0 and 1 when the generated audio should play.
    • With no arguments, the command will regenerate at point 0, i.e. at the beginning of each whole note. You can supply a number, array, or FacetPattern as the argument.
    • This command should go at the end of the chain of commands. Applying further operations after it could alter the sound. This is because play() works by superposing copies of the input FacetPattern at all the playback positions, rather than creating discrete events to fire at each playback position. This helps to keep timing tight, as there is only one event that fires per loop to actually play each voice of audio, and it's always at position 0, where it plays the entire superposed pattern.
    • By default, the FacetPattern will continue to regenerate and play. To prevent it from regenerating, include a keep() operation. To stop playback, use the key command [ctrl + .] or [ctrl + /], or press the stop button "■".
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').play(); // plays once at beginning of loop
      • $('example').randsamp('808').play(0.5); // plays once at middle point
      • $('example').randsamp('808').play(_.noise(4)); // plays once at 4 random positions

  • saveas ( filename )
    • creates a new wav file in the samples/ directory or a sub-directory containing the FacetPattern. If the directory doesn't exist, it will be created.
    • if a file has been created with multiple channels via .channels() or with its audio panned between multiple channels via .pan(), the saved wav file will have that many channels.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').iter(6,()=>{this.append(_.sine(ri(1,40))).saveas('/myNoiseStuff/' + Date.now())}); // creates 6 wav files in the myNoiseStuff directory. Each filename is the UNIX timestamp to preserve order.

  • stitchdir ( dir, samplesBetweenEachFile, saved_filename = 'stitched', num_channels = 1 )
    • stitches together all the wav files in the supplied dir directory, in alphabetical order, creating a new wav file in the samples/ directory or a sub-directory, as specified in saved_filename. If the directory doesn't exist, it will be created.
    • the samplesBetweenEachFile argument can be a single number or a FacetPattern. This value specifies the exact number of samples between each file in the output file. If it's a FacetPattern, its values will be continuously cycled through while stitching together all the files in the directory.
    • all files in the directory should have the same number of channels. The stitched wav file will have num_channels channels (default = 1).
    • Note: this process can take minutes if there are a lot of wavs, so by default any time this method is called, it will be called once and only once.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').stitchdir('mysamples',n1,'myNewStitchedFile'); // stitch together all the wavs in samples/mysamples, with a whole note between each file, creating a new file called MyNewStitchedFile.wav
  • stop ( )
    • stops the command from regenerating and playing back in future loops.
    • any time a .stop() is found in a command, the entire command will be skipped and not executed. This helps to preserve CPU.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n16).play().stop(); // you only hear sound when you remove the stop()

MIDI / OSC output

You might need to activate a MIDI driver on your machine in order to send MIDI from Facet to a DAW. If Facet finds no MIDI drivers, the dropdown select UI in the browser will be empty, and if you try the below commands they will produce no output. Google "install MIDI driver {your OS goes here}" for more information.

You need to connect the MIDI device you want to use before starting Facet.

  • note ( VelocityPattern = 100, DurationPattern = 125, channel = 1 )
    • sends a MIDI note on/off pair for every value in the FacetPattern's data.
    • The VelocityPattern and DurationPattern will automatically scale to match the note pattern. This allows you to modulate MIDI velocity and duration over the course of the whole note.
    • The channel argument by default sends the MIDI out channel 1. It can be set to any channel between 1-16.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1,32).scale(36,90).round().note();
      • $('example').sine(1,ri(32,100)).scale(36,ri(52,100)).prob(rf()).nonzero().round().note();

  • cc ( controller_number = 70, channel = 1 )
    • sends a MIDI cc event bound to controller # controller_number for every value in the FacetPattern's data.
    • Note: This method is automatically scaled into the expected data range for MIDI CC data. It expects a FacetPattern of values between 0 and 1.
    • The channel argument by default sends the MIDI out channel 1. It can be set to any channel between 1-16.
    • example:
      • $('example').drunk(64,0.1).cc();

  • chord ( chord_type, inversion_mode = 0 )

    • creates a chord of MIDI notes for every value in the FacetPattern's data.
    • if the chord_type argument is a FacetPattern, the chord intervals will correspond to the data of the chord_type FacetPattern.
    • if chord_type is a string, it must be from the below list of chord names:

    maj / major = 0,4,7

    min / minor = 0,3,7

    fifth / 5th = 0,5

    seventh / 7th = 0,4,7,10

    major seventh / maj7 = 0,4,7,11

    minor seventh / m7 = 0,3,7,10

    diminished / dim = -1,2,5

    add2 = 0,2,4,7

    add9 = 0,4,7,14

    • if chord_type is a string, the inversion_mode can be 0, 1, 2, or 3. This number represents how many of the values in the chord have been inverted and are now below the root.
    • Note: to force chords into a certain key, use the key() operation after the chord() operation.
    • example:
      • $('example').ramp(36,72,32).chord('maj7').add((bars%4)*12).key('F# major').note(50,100,1);
      • $('example').noise(16).scale(36,90).chord(_.from([3,5,7,10,11,14,16,20,25])).key('c','major').note(); // 9-note chords mapped onto c major

  • key ( key_letter, key_scale )
    • translates a FacetPattern with data in the range of MIDI note numbers (0-127) so all its values now adhere to the supplied key_letter and key_scale.
    • key_letter values: "A", "A#", "B", "C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#"
    • key_scale values can either be a string (see list below) or a FacetPattern containing 1-12 binary numbers (see examples).
    • possible scales: ["major pentatonic", "major", "minor", "major blues", "minor blues", "melodic minor", "harmonic minor", "bebop", "diminished", "dorian", "lydian", "mixolydian", "phrygian", "locrian", "ionian pentatonic", "mixolydian pentatonic", "ritusen", "egyptian", "neopolitan major pentatonic", "vietnamese 1", "pelog", "kumoijoshi", "hirajoshi", "iwato", "in-sen", "lydian pentatonic", "malkos raga", "locrian pentatonic", "minor pentatonic", "minor six pentatonic", "flat three pentatonic", "flat six pentatonic", "scriabin", "whole tone pentatonic", "lydian #5P pentatonic", "lydian dominant pentatonic", "minor #7M pentatonic", "super locrian pentatonic", "minor hexatonic", "augmented", "piongio", "prometheus neopolitan", "prometheus", "mystery #1", "six tone symmetric", "whole tone", "messiaen's mode #5", "locrian major", "double harmonic lydian", "altered", "locrian #2", "mixolydian b6", "lydian dominant", "lydian augmented", "dorian b2", "ultralocrian", "locrian 6", "augmented heptatonic", "dorian #4", "lydian diminished", "leading whole tone", "lydian minor", "phrygian dominant", "balinese", "neopolitan major", "harmonic major", "double harmonic major", "hungarian minor", "hungarian major", "oriental", "flamenco", "todi raga", "persian", "enigmatic", "major augmented", "lydian #9", "messiaen's mode #4", "purvi raga", "spanish heptatonic", "bebop minor", "bebop major", "bebop locrian", "minor bebop", "ichikosucho", "minor six diminished", "half-whole diminished", "kafi raga", "messiaen's mode #6", "composite blues", "messiaen's mode #3", "messiaen's mode #7", "chromatic"]
    • example: $('example').randsamp('808').reduce(32).scale(36,51).key("F# bebop").note();
    • example: $('example').noise(16).scale(30,80).key('c', _.from([1])).note(); // octave scale, via custom FacetPattern
    • example: $('example').noise(16).scale(30,80).key('c', _.from([1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0])).note(); // equivalent to the above custom octave scale; the padded zeroes are optional
    • example: $('example').noise(16).scale(30,80).key('c', _.from([1,0,0,0,0,0,1])).note(); // octave + perfect fifth scale, via custom FacetPattern
    • example: $('example').noise(16).scale(30,80).key('c', _.from([1,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,1])).note(); // octave + tritone + major seventh, via custom FacetPattern

  • osc ( address )
    • sends a packet of OSC data to OSC address address for every value in the FacetPattern's data.
    • The OSC server sends output to port 5813 by default. You can change to a different port by modifying OSC_OUTPORT in js/config.js to whatever port number you need.
    • The address argument must begin with a backslash: /.
    • Note: This method does not automatically scale the FacetPattern values between 0 and 1, so the user can send any range of numbers over OSC.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(128).osc('/test');

  • pitchbend ( channel = 1 )
    • sends a MIDI pitchbend event for every value in the FacetPattern's data.
    • The channel argument by default sends the MIDI out channel 1. It can be set to any channel between 1-16.
    • Note: This method is automatically scaled into the expected range for MIDI pitchbend data. It expects a FacetPattern of values between -1 and 1, with 0 meaning no pitchbend.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).size(128).pitchbend();

Methods for controlling transport BPM

  • bpm ( )
    • stores the FacetPattern data in the transport as BPM values to be cycled through over each loop.
    • example:
      • $('example').bpm(_.from([20,40,80,160,320]).shuffle()); // each loop will be all 5 of these BPM, randomly ordered

Methods for controlling pattern regeneration

  • every ( n_loops )
    • only regenerate the pattern after n_loops loops. By default, patterns regenerate each loop, so this method only needs to be included if you wish to regenerate a pattern less frequently.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(ri(10,500)).times(rf()).every(4).play(); // slightly different sine wave tone every 4 loops

  • keep ( )
    • preserve the generated FacetPattern so that it plays each loop. Without including keep(), the FacetPattern will regenerate each loop by default.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(ri(10,500)).keep().play();

  • once ( )
    • only play the generated FacetPattern a single time. Without including once(), the FacetPattern will regenerate and play back each loop by default.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(4096).play().once();

Methods for setting variables

This can be useful when you want to access the same pattern across multiple commands.

  • set ( name )
    • saves a FacetPattern's data in memory, for reference as a variable in future operations. Any FacetPatterns stored via .set() will only be stored until the server is closed.

    • if a pattern stored with set() has more than one piece of data in it, the corresponding variable will be an array. If the pattern has one piece of data in it, the corresponding variable will be a float.

    • NOTE: when you run the .set() command for the first time after starting the system, if you're also running commands that reference that variable in the same block, an error might display: {your_variable_name_here} is undefined. This will resolve after the first loop, after the variable you just set has fully propagated into the environment.

      • example:

      $('set_example').noise(32).curve().set('my_var').once(); // first, set the variable here

      $('example').noise(100).times(my_var).play(); // now, you can use my_var in commands

      
      

Single number generators

  • barmod ( modulo, values )
    • returns values that depend on the current value of bars. (bars is a global variable that starts at 0 and increments at the completion of a loop.)
    • selects a value from the values array, based on bars % modulo. If the bars value currently is 9, and the modulo argument to this method is 4, since 9 % 4 = 1, this method will return the value from the values array immediately following the number 1.
    • NOTE: It first checks if the values array contains an even number of elements. If not, it throws an error.
    • NOTE: It also checks if every integer from 0 to (mod-1) is one of the even-numbered keys of the values array. If not, it throws an error.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(barmod(4,[0,100,1,150,2,200,3,300])).play(); // when bars % 4 == 0, plays a 100Hz sine. when bars % 4 == 1, plays a 150 Hz sine. when bars % 4 == 2, plays a 200Hz sine. when bars % 4 == 3, plays a 300Hz sine.

  • choose ( pattern )
    • returns a randomly selected value from a supplied array.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(choose([10,200,1000])).play(); // sine wave with either 10, 200, or 1000 cycles

  • cof ( index )
    • returns the element at position index in the circle of fifths, starting with C and ending with F.
    • the set of notes: ['C', 'G', 'D', 'A', 'E', 'B', 'F#', 'C#', 'G#', 'D#', 'A#', 'F'].
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(16).scale(36,90).key(cof(2)).note(); // MIDI notes in D major
      • $('example').noise(16).scale(36,90).key(cof(ri(0,11))).note(); // MIDI notes in random major key

  • ftom ( hzfrequency )
    • converts the supplied hzfrequency value to its corresponding MIDI note number.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(220).times(_.sine(ftom(ri(400,1200)))).play(); // 220Hz sine wave (A) multplied by a chromatically related higher sine wave
  • ms ( milliseconds )
    • converts the supplied milliseconds value to that many samples, at whatever sample rate the user has configured.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(4096).size(ms(5)).play(); // 5ms noise
      • $('example').noise(4096).size(ms(50)).play(); // 50ms noise

  • mtof ( midi_note_number )
    • converts the supplied midi_note_number value to its corresponding frequency in Hz.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(mtof(choose([36,38,40,41,43,45,47,48]))).play(); // random sine wave each loop in C major key

  • mtos ( midi_note_number )
    • converts the supplied midi_note_number value to its corresponding number of samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n4).delay(mtos(choose([36,38,40,41,43,45,47,48]))).delay(mtos(choose([36,38,40,41,43,45,47,48]))).delay(mtos(choose([36,38,40,41,43,45,47,48]))).play(); // noise is delayed by amounts that are harmonic with C major key

  • random ( min = 0, max = 1, int_mode = 0, weight = 1 )
    • returns a random number between min and max. If int_mode = 1, returns an integer. Otherwise, returns a float by default.
    • you can also use these shorthands for a random float: rf(min,max) and a random integer: ri(min,max).
    • The weight argument allows you to specify an exponential weight for the probability of random values. For instance, rf(0.125,8,3) will generate half of its values between 0.125 and 1; and the other half will be between 1 and 8. By default, the weighting is linear, i.e. all values between min and max have equal probability.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(ri(1,1000)).play(); // a sine wave with 1 - 1000 cycles

Methods for controlling MIDI scales

  • randscale ( )
    • returns a random scale for MIDI notes out. The set of possible scales is listed in the key() method.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(32).scale(30,80).sort().key('f# ' + randscale()).note(); // random scale in f#

FacetPattern generators that can take a FacetPattern, number, or array as an argument

When a generator takes a FacetPattern or an array as an argument, it uses that pattern to dynamically change its behavior over time, affecting the output in a more complex way than if a single number were supplied. For example, with the command $('example').sine(440).play();, the output is a static 440Hz wave. But with the command $('example').sine(_.sine(5).scale(20,2000))).play();, the frequency of the sine wave is being modulated by a 5 Hz sine wave which is generating values between 20 and 2000. This produces a classic frequency modulation sound, but since you can supply any FacetPattern as an argument, there are lots of sound design possibilities.

  • sine ( frequencyPattern, duration = sample_rate, samplerate = sample_rate, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a sine wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz sine wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').sine(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').sine(_.sine(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

  • cosine ( frequencyPattern, duration = 1 second, samplerate = default_sample_rate, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a cosine wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').cosine(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz cosine wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').cosine(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').cosine(_.cosine(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

  • circle ( frequencyPattern, duration = 1 second, samplerate = default_sample_rate )
    • generates a half-circle wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from 0 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').circle(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz cosine wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.circle(4)).play().once(); // amplitude modulation of noise with a quarter note circular waveform
      • $('example').noise(n1).ffilter(_.circle(1).invert().size(128).scale(0, NYQUIST/2),_.circle(1).size(128).scale(NYQUIST / 2, NYQUIST)).play().once(); // circular spectral filtering of a whole note of noise

  • phasor ( frequencyPattern, duration = 1 second, samplerate = default_sample_rate, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a phasor wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').phasor(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz phasor wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').phasor(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').phasor(_.phasor(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

  • pluck ( frequencyPattern, duration = 1 second, damping = 0, feedback = 0.5, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a Karplus-Strong type string pluck emulation at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples. damping and feedback values should be between 0 and 1.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').pluck(440,n4,rf(),rf()).play(); // different 440 Hz quarter note pluck each time
      • $('example').pluck(_.ramp(100,2000,300),n1,0,0.99).play(); // ramp from 100Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values

  • rect ( frequencyPattern, duration = 1 second, pulse_width = 0.5, samplerate = default_sample_rate, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a rectangle wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, with a pulse width defined by pulse_width, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').rect(440,n4,rf()).play(); // 440 Hz rectangle wave for a quarter note, different bandwidth each time
      • $('example').rect(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').rect(_.rect(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

  • square ( frequencyPattern, duration = sample_rate, samplerate = sample_rate )
    • generates a square wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').square(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz square wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').square(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').square(_.square(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

  • tri ( frequencyPattern, duration = sample_rate, samplerate = sample_rate, fade_in_and_out = true )
    • generates a triangle wave at frequencyPattern Hertz, lasting for duration samples, at the sample rate defined by samplerate.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • by default, the fade_in_and_out argument is set to true. This will cause the first 30 milliseconds to be faded in an out, to avoid audible clicks. Using a non-truthy value for fade_in_and_out will generate the signal without applying any fade.
    • example:
      • $('example').tri(440,n4).play(); // 440 Hz triangle wave for a quarter note
      • $('example').tri(_.ramp(10,2000,300)).play(); // ramp from 10Hz to 2000 Hz over 300 values
      • $('example').tri(_.tri(5).scale(20,2000)).play(); // 5Hz frequency modulation with output frequencies oscillating between 20Hz and 2000Hz

FacetPattern generators

  • binary ( integer, length)
    • Computes the binary representation of integer. If length is not present, the output FacetPattern will be the actual length of the binary representation of integer.
    • output range is from 0 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').binary(8); // 1000
      • $('example').binary(490321,13); // 1110111101101: truncated at 13 values
      • $('example').binary(8,12); // 000000001000: padded with 0s

  • drunk ( length, intensity, starting_value = Math.random() )
    • generates a random walk of values between 0 and 1 for length values, starting at starting_value which is a random value between 0 and 1 by default. intensity controls how much to add.
    • output range is from 0 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').drunk(16,0.1); // slight random movement

  • envelope ( values )
    • Generates an envelope using the supplied array values, which must have a total number of entries equal to a multiple of 3. The numbers inside the values array should be continually ordered in groups of three: from, to, size, just like the ramp() method.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(ms(500)).times(_.envelope([0,1,ms(10),1,0.1,ms(200),0.1,0,ms(290)])).play(); // transient noise burst

  • euclid ( pulses, steps )
    • generates a Euclidean sequence with pulses pulses over steps steps.
    • output range is from 0 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).times(_.euclid(4,8)).play(); // gating a sine wave with a euclidean sequence

  • file ( filepath )
    • loads the raw data of any file into memory. You can supply any file type.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • By default, it checks for a file in the files subdirectory. If no file exists there, it will try to load the file as an absolute path on your hard drive.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').file('my_image.png').play(); // if my_image.png is in the files directory, this will play the file's raw data. NOTE: this could be very noisy!
      • $('example').file('/Users/my_username/Desktop/myfile.zip').play(); // example with a supplied absolute file path

  • from ( pattern )
    • allows the user to specify their own pattern. Note the array syntax!
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]);

  • image ( filepath, columnsPerSecond = 512, minimumFrequency = 20, maximumFrequency = sample_rate / 2, frequencyPattern )
    • transposes an image into audio by superposing sine waves across the audio spectrum, with one sine wave for each row of pixels in the image. The amplitudes of each sine wave are modulated by the corresponding brightness of each pixel in the image, producing an analog of the image in the audio spectrum.
    • the lowest pixels in the image correspond to the lowest frequencies in the output, and the highest pixels in the image correspond to the highest frequencies in the output.
    • the default columnsPerSecond value of 512 means that each second of audio will contain 512 columns of pixels. This value can be larger or smaller, but keep in mind that as this value decreases, the file will take more time to generate. This method can be CPU intensive and works best with smaller image files or larger columnsPerSecond values.
    • since pixel brightness corresponds with loudness, images with dark backgrounds and high contrast will produce clearer tones.
    • This method currently only works with PNG files.
    • the minimumFrequency and maximumFrequency values control the range of frequencies that the pixels will map onto.
    • the frequencyPattern argument allows you to remap the rows of pixels with a FacetPattern. It should be scaled between 0 and 1. It will automatically be resized so its data length matches the height of the image in pixels. Lower values in frequencyPattern will map onto lower frequencies inside the range of minimumFrequency and maximumFrequency. Higher values in frequencyPattern will map onto higher frequencies inside the range of minimumFrequency and maximumFrequency.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').image('/path/to/file/goes/here.png',1024).play(); // each column lasts 1024 samples

  • noise ( length )
    • generates a random series of values between -1 and 1 for length.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(1024).play();

  • primes ( n, offset_from_first_prime = 2, skip = 1 )
    • generates the first n prime numbers starting at offset, skipping skip prime numbers before including the next one in the list.
    • n specifies the number of prime numbers to generate.
    • offset specifies the first number to be included in the list of prime numbers. The default value is 2.
    • skip specifies the number of prime numbers to skip before including the next one in the list. The default value is 1.
    • example:
      • $('s').noise(n4).times(_.ramp(1,0,n4)).iter(12,()=>{this.allpass().delay(_.primes(60,1000,ri(20,2000)).data[i]).full()}).full().play(); // generates a quarter note transient burst of noise, then iteratively sends it through delays that are all primes
  • ramp ( from, to, size = 128 )
    • moves from from to to over size values.
    • example:
      • $('example').ramp(250,100,1000); // go from 250 to 100 over 1000 values

  • randfile ( dir = ../files/ )
    • loads a random file from the files directory into memory. The default directory is ../files/, but you can supply any directory as an argument.
    • output range is from -1 - 1.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').randfile().play(); // random new file converted to audio every time

  • randsamp ( dir = ../samples/ channel_index = 0 )
    • loads a random wav file from the dir directory into memory. The default directory is ../samples/, but you can supply any directory as an argument.
    • By default, it loads the first channel (channel_index = 0) but you can specify any channel to load.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').reverse().play(); // random backwards sample

  • sample ( filepath, channel_index = 0)
    • loads a wav file from the samples/ directory into memory. You can also specify any file with an absolute file path. The .wav can be omitted from filename; in this case .wav it will be automatically appended to filename. By default, it loads the first channel (channel_index = 0) but you can specify any channel to load.
    • Note: this example uses MacOS / Linux file paths with forward slashes (e.g. my/path/here). For Windows, you will need to use back slashes (e.g my\path\here)
    • example:
      • $('example').sample('1234').play(); // if 1234.wav is in the samples directory, you're good to go
      • $('example').sample('./myfolder/myfile.wav'); // or point to the file with a relative path

  • silence ( length )
    • generates silence (many 0s in a row) for length samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').silence(n2).append(_.noise(n2)).play(); // first half of loop is silence; second half is noise

  • spiral ( length, degrees = 360/length, angle_phase_offset = 0 )
    • generates a spiral of length length of continually ascending values in a circular loop between 0 and 1, where each value is degrees away from the previous value. degrees can be any number between 0 and 360. By default degrees is set to 360/length which produces an output pattern similar to branching leaves, where each value is as far away as possible from the previous value.
    • The angle_phase_offset argument changes where the sequence starts. At its default value of 0, the first value will be 0. You can supply any float between 0 and 1, and the sequence will begin at that value instead.
    • output range is from 0 - 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).times(_.spiral(1000,ri(1,360))).play(); // an interesting, modulated sine wave

  • turing ( length )
    • generates a pattern of length length with random 1s and 0s.
    • example:
      • $('example').turing(64); // instant rhythmic triggers

FacetPattern modulators

  • abs ( )
    • returns the absolute value of all numbers in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).add(-0.3).abs().play(); // a wonky sine

  • allpass ( frequency = default_sample_rate/2 )
    • runs the FacetPattern through an allpass filter.
    • frequency changes the amount of phase shift introduced by the filter at different frequencies. It will change the phase response of the filter while leaving the magnitude response unchanged.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').iter(12,()=>{this.allpass().delay(ri(1,6000))}).scale(-1,1).play(); // reverb

  • at ( position, value )
    • replaces the value of a FacetPattern at the relative position position with value.
    • example:
      • $('example').turing(16).at(0,1); // the 1st value of the 16-step Turing sequence (i.e. 0% position) is always 1
      • $('example').turing(16).at(0.5,2); // the 9th value of the 16-step Turing sequence (i.e. 50% position) is always 2

  • audio ( )
    • removes any DC offset on the FacetPattern by running it through a high-pass biquadratic filter at 5Hz.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').times(_.noise(4)).audio().play();

  • bitshift ( shift = 16 )
    • performs a bitwise rotation on the elements of the FacetPattern object’s data array by shift bits.
    • shift is an optional parameter that specifies the number of bits to rotate. It defaults to 16 if not provided. The value of shift is converted to a non-negative integer and taken modulo 32 before being used.
    • The method first scales the values in the data array to a range of 0 to 1000000 and rounds them to integers. It then performs a bitwise rotation on each element using a combination of the left shift (<<) and right shift (>>>) operators. Finally, it restores the original scale of the data.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1000,n2).bitshift(16).play(); // rotates the bits of a 1000Hz sine wave by 16 positions

  • changed ( )
    • returns a 1 or 0 for each value in the FacetPattern. If the value is different than the previous value, returns a 1. Otherwise returns a 0. (The first value is compared against the last value in the FacetPattern.)
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,1,3,4]).changed(); // 1 0 1 1

  • clip ( min, max )
    • clips any numbers in the FacetPattern to a min and max range.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).clip(2,3); // 2 2 3 3

  • compress ( ratio, threshold, attackTime, releaseTime )
    • compresses the FacetPattern into a smaller dynamic range. ratio is a float between 0 and 1 corresponding to n:1 so 0.5 would be 2:1, 0.2 would be 5:1, etc. threshold is the sample amplitude at which compression kicks in. attackTime and releaseTime are expressed as relations to a second, so 0.1 would be 1/10th of a second.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').compress(0.1,0.001,0.01,0.01).play();

  • crab ( )
    • superposes a reversed copy of the FacetPattern on top of iself, so it plays backwards and forwards at the same time..
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(_.ramp(20,2000,1000)).crab().full().play(); // sine wave ramps from 20Hz to 2000Hz both backwards and forwards at the same time

  • curve ( tension = 0.5, segments = 25 )
    • returns a curved version of the FacetPattern. Tension and number of segments in the curve can be included but default to 0.5 and 25, respectively.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(16).curve(); // not so noisy
      • $('example').noise(16).curve(0.5, 10); // fewer segments per curve
      • $('example').noise(16).curve(0.9); // different curve type

  • distavg ( )
    • computes the distance from the average of the FacetPattern, for each element in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,4,3.14]).distavg(); // -2.3133 1.5867 0.7267

  • dup ( num )
    • duplicates the FacetPattern num times.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n16).dup(ri(2,12)).play(); // 16th note of noise repeats between 2 and 12 times each loop

  • echo ( num, feedback = 0.666 )
    • repeats the FacetPattern num times, with amplitude multiplied by feedback each repeat.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1]).echo(5); // 1 0.666 0.4435 0.29540 0.19674 0.13103
      • $('example').phasor(50).size(n8).echo(7).play(); // echoing out over a whole note

  • fade ( fade_percent = 0.1 )
    • applies a crossfade window to the FacetPattern, where fade_percent of the beginning and end are faded in/out.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(1024).fade().play();

  • fadein ( fade_percent = 0.5 )
    • applies a fade to the beginning of the FacetPattern, where fade_percent of the beginning is faded in.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(20000).fadein().play();

  • fadeout ( fade_percent = 0.5 )
    • applies a fade to the ending 50% of the FacetPattern, where fade_percent of the beginning is faded out.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(20000).fadeout().play();

  • fkey ( MIDI_note_scale, binThreshold = 0.005, maxHarmonic = 10 )
    • applies a spectral gate to the FacetPattern, muting any frequency bins that do not closely map onto a MIDI note frequency included in MIDI_note_scale.
    • binThreshold controls how close a bin frequency must be to a MIDI note frequency or its harmonic in order to be kept. For example, if binThreshold is set to 0.1, then a bin frequency must be within 10% of a MIDI note frequency or its harmonic in order to be kept.
    • maxHarmonic controls how many integer harmonics of MIDI notes in MIDI_note_scale to include in the output.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.ramp(1,0,n1)).fkey(_.from([48,50,52,53,55,57,59,60]),0.005,6).play(); // noise spectrally filtered to bins matching C major notes 48,50,52,53,55,57,59,60 and their 6 next harmonics

  • flange ( delaySamples = 220, depth = 110 )
    • applies a flanger effect to the FacetPattern.
    • delaySamples is the base delay in samples. Controls the delay of the flanging effect.
    • depth is the maximum amount by which the delay is modulated. Controls the depth of the flanging effect.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100,n1).flange(220,110).play(); // flanged whole note sine wave at 100Hz

  • flipabove ( maximum )
    • for all values above maximum, it returns maximum minus how far above the value was.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).flipabove(0.2).play(); // wonky sine

  • flipbelow ( min )
    • for all values below minimum, it returns minimum plus how far below the value was.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).flipbelow(0.2).play(); // inverse wonky sine

  • follow ( attackTime = default_sample_rate / 10, releaseTime = default_sample_rate / 4 )
    • performs envelope following on a FacetPattern.
    • attackTime is the attack time in samples. It controls the speed at which the envelope rises. Its default value is 100ms.
    • releaseTime is the release time in samples. It controls the speed at which the envelope falls. Its default value is 250ms.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).times(_.noise(32).scale(0,1).size(n1).follow(n16,n16)).play(); // controlling the amplitude of a whole note of noise, with 32 samples of noise sent through the envelope follower

  • fracture ( pieces )
    • divides and scrambles the FacetPattern into pieces pieces.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).fracture(10).play(); // the sine has shattered into 10 pieces!

  • ftom ( )
    • converts all values in the FacetPattern from frequency values (Hz) to MIDI note values.
    • example:
      • $('example').ramp(1000,250,16).ftom(); // 83, 82, 82, 81, 80, 79, 77, 76, 75, 74, 72, 71, 69, 67, 65, 62

  • full ( )
    • rescales the FacetPattern to a full dynamic range between -1 and 1, without any dynamic range compression, in a more efficient way than scale(-1,1).
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n2).times(0.1).loud().play(); // remove loud() to hear the difference

  • gate ( threshold, attackSamples, releaseSamples )
    • gates the incoming FacetPattern so that any values below threshold, after attackSamples have occurred, will be set to 0, until the values go back above threshold for releaseSamples.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(50).gate(0.1,20,20).play();

  • gt ( amt )
    • returns 1 for every value in the FacetPattern greater than amt and 0 for all other values.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,0.3,0.5,0.7]).gt(0.6); // 0 0 0 1

  • gte ( amt )
    • returns 1 for every value in the FacetPattern greater than or equal to amt and 0 for all other values.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,0.3,0.5,0.7]).gte(0.5); // 0 0 1 1

  • interp ( weight = 0.5, name )
    • interpolates the FacetPattern with a FacetPattern. A weight of 0.5 gives equal weight to both patterns.
      • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).interp(0.5,_.randsamp('808')).play(); // 50% sine wave; 50% random sample

  • invert ( )
    • computes the minimum and maximum values in the FacetPattern, then scales every number to the opposite position, relative to minimum and maximum.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0,0.1,0.5,0.667,1]).invert(); // 1 0.9 0.5 0.333 0

  • jam ( prob, amt )
    • changes values in the FacetPattern. prob (float 0-1) sets the likelihood of each value changing. amt is how much bigger or smaller the changed values can be. If amt is set to 2, and prob is set to 0.5 half the values could have any number between 2 and -2 added to them.
    • example:
      • $('example').drunk(128,0.05).jam(0.1,0.7); // small 128 step random walk with larger deviations from the jam

  • lt ( amt )
    • returns 1 for every value in the FacetPattern less than amt and 0 for all other values.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,0.3,0.5,0.7]).lt(0.6); // 1 1 0 0

  • lte ( amt )
    • returns 1 for every value in the FacetPattern less than or equal to amt and 0 for all other values.
    • example:
      • $('example').from(0.1,0.3,0.5,0.7]).lte(0.5); // 1 1 1 0

  • log ( intensity , direction )
    • stretches a FacetPattern according to a logarithmic curve, where the values at the end can be stretched for a significant portion of the FacetPattern, and the values at the beginning can be squished together. The intensity of the curve is controlled by intensity, which accepts a float between 0 and 1. If direction is negative, it returns the FacetPattern in reverse.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n8).log(rf()).play(); // each time a different logarithmic curve on the 8th note of noise

  • mtof ( )
    • converts all values in the FacetPattern from MIDI note values to frequency values (Hz).
    • example:
      • $('example').from([60,55,76,100]).mtof(); // 261.63, 220, 659.26, 2637.02

  • mtos ( )
    • converts all values in the FacetPattern from MIDI note values to samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n4).comb(_.noise(128).scale(0,127).key('c major').mtos().sort()).play(); // comb filter delayed by sample values in c major on a quarter note of noise

  • modulo ( amt )
    • returns the modulo i.e. % amt calculation for each value in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).modulo(3); // 1 2 0 1

  • mutechunks ( chunks, prob )
    • slices the input FacetPattern into chunks chunks and mutes prob percent of them. Note: this is intended for use with FacetPatterns with a large enough amount of data to be played back at audio rate. For a similar effect on smaller FacetPatterns, use prob().
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').mutechunks(16,0.33).play(); // 33% of 16 audio slices muted

  • normalize ( )
    • scales the FacetPattern to the 0 - 1 range.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).times(4000).normalize(); // the gain is undone!
      • $('example').sine(1).scale(-10,10).normalize(); // works with negative values

  • nonzero ( )
    • replaces all instances of 0 with the previous nonzero value. Useful after with probability controls, which by default will set some values to 0. Chaining a nonzero() after that would replace the 0s with the other values the pattern. Particularly in a MIDI context with .prob(), you probably don't want to send MIDI note values of 0, so this will effectively sample and hold each nonzero value, keeping the MIDI note values in the expected range.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).prob(0.5).nonzero(); // if 2 and 4 are set to 0 by prob(0.5), the output of .nonzero() would be 1 1 3 3

  • palindrome ( )
    • returns the original FacetPattern plus the reversed FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0,1,2,3]).palindrome(); // 0 1 2 3 3 2 1 0

  • pow ( expo, direction = 1 )
    • stretches a FacetPattern according to an exponential power expo, where the values at the beginning can be stretched for a significant portion of the FacetPattern, and the values at the end can be squished together. If direction is negative, returns the FacetPattern in reverse.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).pow(6.5).play(); // squished into the end
      • $('example').sine(100).pow(6.5,-1).play(); // squished at the beginning

  • prob ( amt )
    • sets some values in the FacetPattern to 0. prob (float 0-1) sets the likelihood of each value changing.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).prob(0.5); // 1 0 3 0 first time it runs
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).prob(0.5); // 0 0 3 4 second time it runs
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).prob(0.5); // 0 2 3 4 third time it runs

  • quantize ( resolution )
    • returns 0 for every step in the FacetPattern whose position is not a multiple of resolution.
    • example:
      • $('example').drunk(16,0.5).quantize(4); // 0.5241 0 0 0 0.7420 0 0 0 1.0 0 0 0 0.4268 0 0 0

  • range ( new_min, new_max )
    • returns the subset of the FacetPattern from the relative positions of new_min (float 0-1) and new_max (float 0-1).
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,0.2,0.3,0.4]).range(0.5,1); // 0.3 0.4

  • rangesamps ( start, length )
    • returns a subset of the FacetPattern, using a relative start position (between 0 - 1) and a total length in samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(n1).log(0.9).rangesamps(rf(0,0.875),n8).play(); // plays a different 8th note from the same de-pitched sine wave every time
      • $('example').silence(n1).iter(128,()=>{this.sup(_.noise(n64).lpf(_.ramp(250,40,20),50).times(_.ramp(1,0,n64)).rangesamps(rf(),n64).fade(0.1),rf())}).play(); // granular synthesis of 128 synthesized kick drums

  • rechunk ( chunks, probability )
    • slices the input FacetPattern into chunks chunks and shuffles the chunks around. The probability argument controls the percentage of chunks to reorder, and it expects a float between 0 and 1. Note: this is intended for use with FacetPatterns with a large enough amount of data to be played back at audio rate. For a similar effect on smaller FacetPatterns, use shuffle() or fracture.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').rechunk(16).play(); // 16 slices from the sample in random order

  • reduce ( new_size )
    • reduces the FacetPattern length to new_size. If new_size is larger than the FacetPattern length, no change.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).reduce(2); // 1 3

  • replace ( original_value, new_value )
    • replaces all instances of original_value with new_value in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([42,0,0,36]).replace(0,-1); // 42,-1,-1,36

  • resonate ( baseFrequency, coefficients, q = 80, wet = 1 )
    • resonates the FacetPattern running it through parallel bandpass filters. Each number in the coefficients FacetPattern is multiplied by the baseFrequency to determine the frequency for that bandpass filter.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n16).times(_.ramp(1,0,n16)).resonate(mtof(36),_.ramp(1,20,20),80).play(); // 16th note transient noise burst, resonating at its first 20 harmonics starting at 65.41 Hz (MIDI note C2, mtof(36))

  • reverb ( size = 1, feedback = 0.85 )
    • applies the Schroeder reverb algorithm to the FacetPattern. The size argument should be between 0 and 2 for most use cases but can go up to 10.
    • the feedback argument controls feedback in the reverb algorithm. It should be between 0 and 0.98.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').reverb(rf()).play(); // different reverb size for random sample each loop

  • reverse ( )
    • returns the reversed FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').ramp(0,1,128).reverse(); // goes from 1 to 0 over 128 values

  • round ( )
    • rounds all values in the FacetPattern to an integer.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0.1,0.5,0.9,1.1]).round(); // 0 1 1 1

  • saheach ( n )
    • samples and holds every nth value in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(6).saheach(2); // 0.33173470944031735, 0.33173470944031735, 0.17466890792169742, 0.17466890792169742, 0.5601080880419886, 0.5601080880419886

  • size ( new_size )
    • upscales or downscales the FacetPattern prior to playback, so its length is new_size samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(1000).size(n1).play(); // upscaling 1000 samples of noise to be 1 whole note long

  • scale ( new_min, new_max, exponent = 1 )
    • moves the FacetPattern to a new range, from new_min to new_max, with exponent allowing for nonlinear transformations. NOTE: this method will return the average of new_min and new_max if the FacetPattern is only 1 value long. since you cannot interpolate where the value would fall in the new range, without a larger FacetPattern to provide initial context of the value's relative position. This operation works better with sequences larger than 3 or 4.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(10,100).scale(0,1); // unipolar signal

  • shift ( amt )
    • moves the FacetPattern to the left or the right. amt gets wrapped to values between -1 and 1, since you can't shift more than 100% left or 100% right.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).shift(-0.5); // 3 4 2 1

  • shuffle ( prob = 1 )
    • randomizes the order of the elements in the FacetPattern.
    • The prob argument controls the percentage of data to shuffle. It should be a float between 0 and 1. A prob of 1 means 100% of the elements will shuffle; a prob of 0.5 means 50% of the elements will shuffle, etc.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).shuffle(); // first time: 3 2 1 4
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).shuffle(); // second time: 1 3 4 2

  • skip ( prob )
    • Sometimes, skip executing the command, as if it had never been attempted. Useful if you only want to update the FacetPattern some of the time, but otherwise want to preserve the previous data.
      • example:
      • $('example').spiral(16,random(1,360)).skip(0.95); // new pattern 5% of the time when this command runs

  • slew ( depth = 25, up_speed = 1, down_speed = 1 )
    • adds upwards and/or downwards slew to the FacetPattern. depth controls how many slew values exist between each value. up_speed and down_speed control how long the slew lasts: at 0, the slew has no effect, whereas at 1, the slew occurs over the entire depth between each FacetPattern value.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0,0.5,0.9,0.1]).slew(25,0,1) // the first three numbers will jump immediately because upwards slew is 0. then it will slew from 0.9 to 0.1 over the course of the entire depth range

  • smooth ( )
    • interpolates each value so it falls exactly between the values that precede and follow it.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(64).smooth(); // less noisy

  • sort ( )
    • returns the FacetPattern ordered lowest to highest.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(128).sort(); // ascending values originally from noise

  • speed ( amt )
    • increases or decreases the playback speed of the FacetPattern, similar to transposing audio samples up or down. An amt value of 0.5 will play at half speed. An amt value of 2 will play at double speed.
    • example
      • $('example').randsamp('808').speed(0.2); // slow sample
      • $('example').randsamp('808').speed(1.5); // fast sample

  • sticky ( amt )
    • samples and holds values in the FacetPattern based on probability. amt (float 0-1) sets the likelihood of each value being sampled and held.
    • example
      • $('example').noise(n4).sticky(0.98); // quarter note of "sticky" noise

  • stretchto ( num_samples )
    • time-stretches the FacetPattern while preserving pitch so it now lasts num_samples samples.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1000,n2).stretchto(n1).play(); // 1000Hz sine wave originally a half note long, stretched to a whole note

  • stutter ( number_of_repeats, start_pos = 0, end_pos = 1 )
    • creates _number_of_repeats_ identical chunks of data, calculated from the start_pos and end_pos values, which represent two relative positions between 0 and 1 in the input FacetPattern's data. After all the repeats have been appended to it, the FacetPattern is resized back to its original length.
    • example
      • $('example').sine(100).stutter(16,rf(),rf()).size(n1).play(); // copies a unique sub-section of the same sine wave 16 times

  • subset ( percentage )
    • returns a subset of the FacetPattern with percentage% values in it.
    • example:
      • $('example').phasor(1).size(50).subset(0.3); // originally 50 values long, now 0.02 0.08 0.50 0.58 0.62 0.700 0.76 0.78 0.92

  • truncate ( length )
    • truncates the FacetPattern so it's now length values long. If length is longer than the FacetPattern, return the whole FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0,1,2,3]).truncate(2); // now 2 values long
      • $('example').from([0,1,2,3]).truncate(6); // still 4 values long

  • tune ( note = "c", binThreshold = 0.005 )
    • applies a spectral gate to the FacetPattern, muting any frequency bins that do not closely map onto the supplied note.
    • note values: "A", "A#", "B", "C", "C#", "D", "D#", "E", "F", "F#", "G", "G#"
    • binThreshold controls how close a bin frequency must be to the supplied note's harmonics in order to be kept. For example, if binThreshold is set to 0.1, then a bin frequency must be within 10% of a harmonic in the supplied note in order to be kept.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).tune('c',0.0001).play(); // tuning a whole note of noise to c

  • unique ( )
    • returns the set of unique values in the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,0,0.4,2]).unique(); // 1 2 3 0 0.4

  • walk ( prob, amt )
    • changes positions in the FacetPattern. prob (float 0-1) sets the likelihood of each position changing. amt controls how many steps the values can move. If amt is set to 10, and prob is set to 0.5 half the values could move 10 positions to the left or the right.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([0,1,2,0,1,0.5,2,0]).walk(0.25, 3);

  • wrap ( min, max )
    • folds FacetPattern values greater than max so their output continues at min. If the values are twice greater than max, their output continues at min again. Similar for values less than min, such that they wrap around the min/max thresholds.
    • if no value is entered for max, then the first argument will be used to create the min and max, centered around 0. For instance, wrap(0.3) == wrap(-0.3,0.3)
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).add(-0.1).wrap(0.2,0.5).play();

Pattern modulators that can take a FacetPattern, number, or array as an argument

When a modulator takes a FacetPattern or an array as an argument, it uses that pattern to dynamically change its behavior over time, affecting the output in a more complex way than if a single number were supplied. For example, with the command $('example').noise(16).add(4), all 16 output values will be between 4 and 5, because 4 is added to every noise value, and noise values are between 0 and 1 by default. But with the command $('example').noise(16).add(_.ramp(0,4,16)), the output values will ramp from between 0-1 at the beginning to between 4-5 at the end, since the FacetPattern that is being added is a ramp of values starting at 0 and ending at 4.

  • add ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true )
    • adds the first FacetPattern and the second FacetPattern. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').add(_.randsamp('808')).play(); // two random samples each loop

  • bpf ( cutoffPattern = 1000, q = 2.5 )
    • applies a bandpass filter with configurable cutoffPattern and q to the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).bpf(1000,6).times(0.1).play(); // band-passed noise
      • $('example').noise(n1).bpf(_.sine(4).scale(10,1000)).play(); // 4-cycle LFO modulating the bandpass cutoff between 10 and 1000 Hz

  • comb ( delaySamplesPattern = sample_rate / 100, feedforward = 0.5, feedback = 0.5 )
    • applies a comb filter to the input data. The _delaySamplesPattern_ parameter is equal to 10ms by default and specifies the number of samples to delay the input signal. The feedforward parameter controls the amount of the input signal that is fed directly to the output. The feedback parameter controls the amount of feedback applied to the delay, allowing the delayed signal to be mixed back into the input.
    • The feedback and feedforward values are clamped between 0 and 0.98.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n4).comb(ms(10),0.5,0.5).play();

  • crush ( numberOfBitsPattern, downsamplingPattern )
    • applies bit crushing and / or downsampling to the incoming FacetPattern.
    • numberOfBitsPattern controls the bit depth for the output pattern. To hear the effect, the values need to be integers between 1 and 8. Lower values produce more drastic results.
    • downsamplingPattern controls the fator by which to reduce the sample rate. Values need to be integers greater than 1. Higher values produce more drastic results.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).crush(2).play(); // redux on the sine wave
      • $('example').sine(100,n1).crush(_.ramp(8,1,8)).play(); // ramping bit depth on 100Hz sine wave from 8 bits to 1
      • $('example').sine(100,n1).crush(_.ramp(8,1,8),_.noise(16).scale(1,40)).play(); // ramping bit depth on 100Hz sine wave from 8 bits to 1, and dynamically changing the downsampling amount between 1 and 40 samples

  • delay ( delaySamplesPattern, feedback = 0.5 )
    • delays the input FacetPattern by delaySamplesPattern samples. The feedback parameter controls the amount of feedback applied to the delay, allowing the delayed signal to be mixed back into the input.
    • the maximum feedback value is 0.975.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').delay(random(1700,10000)).play();

  • divide ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true )
    • divides the first FacetPattern by the second. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).divide(_.from([0.5,0.25,0.1,1]));

  • ffilter ( minFreqPattern, maxFreqPattern, invertMode = false)
    • applies a spectral filter to the FacetPattern, passing only the frequency bins between minFreqPattern and maxFreqPattern.
    • you can invert the filter mode so it cuts all the bins between minFreqPattern and maxFreqPattern by sending a truthy value for invertMode.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n16).ffilter(200,2000).play(); // noise between 200Hz - 2000Hz

  • fgate ( gateThresholdPattern = 0.1 )
    • applies a spectral gate to the FacetPattern, muting any frequency bins lower than gateThresholdPattern. The magnitudes of each FFT bin are normalized from 0 - 1. A gateThresholdPattern of 0 will pass every bin, and a gateThresholdPattern of 1 will mute every bin.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n16).fgate(0.7).play(); // try experimenting with different threshold values

  • fshift ( shiftAmountPattern )
    • applies a spectral bin shift to the FacetPattern. shiftAmountPattern values lower than 0 will cause the bottom to wrap the top, and the rest of the spectrum moves downwards. shiftAmountPattern values higher than 0 will cause the top of the spectrum to wrap to the bottom, and the rest of the spectrum moves upwards.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).fshift(0.04).play(); // try experimenting with different shift values

  • harmonics ( numHarmonicsPattern )
    • adds numHarmonicsPattern harmonics to the input signal.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(10).harmonics(200).play(); // 10Hz sine wave with 200 harmonics added on top
      • $('example').sine(10,n1).harmonics(_.ramp(0,200,200)).play(); // ramping up from 0 harmonics on the 10Hz wave to 200 harmonics

  • hpf ( cutoffPattern = 100, q = 2.5 )
    • applies a high pass filter with configurable cutoffPattern and q to the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).hpf(2000,6).times(0.1).play(); // high-passed noise
      • $('example').noise(n1).hpf(_.sine(4).scale(10000,20000)).play(); // 4-cycle LFO modulating the high pass cutoff between 10000 and 20000 Hz

  • lpf ( cutoffPattern )
    • applies a low pass filter with configurable cutoffPattern and q to the FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).lpf(1000,6).times(0.1).play(); // low-passed noise
      • $('example').noise(n1).lpf(_.sine(4).scale(10,2000)).play(); // 4-cycle LFO modulating the high pass cutoff between 10 and 2000 Hz

  • pitch ( pitchShiftPattern )
    • pitch-shifts the FacetPattern. pitchShiftPattern values between 0 and 1 will lower the pitch; e.g. a value of 0.5 will shift it down an octave. Values higher than 1 will increase the pitch; e.g. a value of 2 will be an octave higher.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).shift(rf(0.5,2)); // sometimes lower pitch, sometimes higher pitch
      • $('example').sine(100).pitch(_.noise(16).scale(0.5,2)).play(); // pitch shifts a 100Hz wave at 16 places, sometimes lower and sometimes higher

  • stretch ( shiftAmountPattern, chunksPerSecondPattern = 128 )
    • time-stretches the FacetPattern while preserving pitch. shiftAmountPattern values less than 1 will shorten its overall length; values greater than 1 will increase its length. chunksPerSecondPattern is the number of chunks that the timestretching algorithm will generate per second. Smaller values will produce more discrete repetitions; larger values will produce more of a bitcrushing, harmonic distortion effect. The largest chunksPerSecondPattern value is SAMPLE_RATE / (SAMPLE_RATE * 0.002), which is 500 a sample rate of 44100.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100,n4).stretch(4).play(); // stretching a quarter note sine wave to last a whole note
      • $('example').noise(n1).stretch(_.ramp(0.125,4,16)).play().once(); // stretching a whole note of noise over 16 ramped values, starting at 8x faster and ending at 4x slower

  • subtract ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true )
    • subtracts the second FacetPattern from the first. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(100).subtract(_.cosine(50)).play();

  • tanh ( gainPattern = 20 )
    • outputs the hyperbolic tangent method for the input FacetPattern, always returning values between -1 and 1. Higher gainPattern values will create more intense distortion.
    • example:
      • $('example').phasor(1,20).times(10).tanh(6); // 0 0.995 0.9999 0.99999996 0.9999999999 0.999999999999 0.9999999999999996 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
      • $('example').sine(100).tanh(_.ramp(0,100,100)).play(); // ramping tanh distortion up on a 100Hz sine wave

  • times ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true)
    • multiplies the first FacetPattern by the second. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(50).times(_.sine(50)).play();

Pattern modulators that must take a second FacetPattern as an argument

  • and ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true )
    • computes the logical AND of both FacetPattern, returning a 0 if one of the values is 0 and returning a 1 if both of the values are nonzero. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,0,1,0]).and(_.from([0,1])); // 0 0 1 0

  • append ( FacetPattern )
    • concatenates the second FacetPattern onto the first.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).append(_.phasor(1)).append(_.from([1,2,3,4]));

  • chaos ( FacetPattern, iterations = 100, cx = 0, cy = 0)
    • each piece of data in the FacetPattern is paired with the corresponding value in the second FacetPattern. The resulting complex number x,y coordinate is run through a function: f(x) = x2 + c, over iterations iterations. The output is a value between 0 and 1, which corresponds to how stable or unstable that particular point is in the complex number plane.
    • By default, both cx and cy are set to 0 (Mandelbrot set). But you can set them to other values from -1 to 1, which can produce all sorts of Julia set variations.
    • example: $('example').sine(n1).chaos(_.drunk(n1,0.01)).play();

  • convolve ( FacetPattern )
    • computes the convolution between the two FacetPatterns.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').convolve(_.randsamp('808')).play(); // convolving random samples

  • equals ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = true )
    • computes the logical EQUALS of both FacetPattern, returning a 0 if the values don't equal each other and returning a 1 if they do. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).equals(_.sine(2));

  • ichunk ( FacetPattern )
    • slices the input into FacetPattern.length windowed chunks (to avoid audible clicks). Loops through every value of FacetPattern as a lookup table, determining which ordered chunk of audio from the input sequence it corresponds to, and appends that window to the output buffer.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').ichunk(_.ramp(rf(),rf(),256)).play(); // play 256 slices between two random points of a random sample... timestretching :)

  • interlace ( FacetPattern )
    • interlaces two FacetPatterns. If one FacetPattern is smaller, it will be interspersed evenly throughout the other FacetPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).interlace(_.phasor(1,20));

  • map ( FacetPattern )
    • forces all values of the input FacetPattern to be mapped onto a new set of values from a second FacetPattern.**
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).map([11,12,13,14]); // 11 11 11 11
      • $('example').from([1,2,3,4]).scale(30,34).map(_.from([31,31.5,32,32.5])); // 31 31.5 32.5 32.5

  • or ( FacetPattern, match_sizes = false )
    • computes the logical OR of both FacetPattern, returning a 0 if both of the values are 0 and returning a 1 if either of the values are nonzero. If match_sizes is false, the output FacetPattern will be the longer pattern's length, and the "missing" values from the shorter pattern will be set to 0. If match_sizes is true, both FacetPatterns will be made the same size before the calculations occur.
    • example:
      • $('example').from([1,0,1,0]).or(_.from([0,1])); // 1 0 1 1

  • sieve ( FacetPattern )
    • uses the second FacetPattern as a lookup table, with each value's relative value determining which value from the input sequence to select.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(1024).sieve(_.sine(10)); // sieving noise with a sine wave into the audio rate :D

  • splice ( FacetPattern, position )
    • inserts the second FacetPattern into the input FacetPattern at relative position between 0 and 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').splice(_.noise(n16),0.5).play(); // inserts a 16th note of noise halfway through the random sample

  • sup ( FacetPattern, startPositionPattern, maxFrameSize = whole_note_samples )
    • superposes a second FacetPattern onto the first. The startPositionPattern value can be any value between 0 and 1, or an array, or a FacetPattern. It controls the relative position(s) in the input FacetPattern to begin superposing FacetPattern. The maxFrameSize value specifies the farthest sample value from the first FacetPattern, which would be equal to a startPosition of 1.
    • example:
      • $('example').silence(n1).sup(_.randsamp('808'),0,n1).sup(_.randsamp('808'),0.5,n1).play(); // superpose two samples at the 0% and 50% points through each loop
  • vocode ( carrierPattern )
    • creates a vocoder effect where the amplitude envelope of each frequency bin in the input FacetPattern controls the amplitude of each freuqency bin in carrierPattern.
    • for a "classic" vocoding effect, use a rhythmic sample as the input FacetPattern and a melodic pattern for carrierPattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').seq('808/* 808/* 808/* 808/* 808/* 808/* 808/* 808/*').vocode(_.square([220,440,110,110])).play(); // vocode sequence of random 808 sample with simple square wave pattern

Pattern modulators with a function as one of the arguments

For more examples, refer to the examples/this.md file.

  • mix ( wet, command = function )
    • Mixes the input FacetPattern with a second FacetPattern generated by command.
    • The command that will be mixed must start with the reserved word: this (see example).
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').mix(0.5,()=>{this.reverse().speed(2).echo(8).speed(10)}).play();

  • iter ( num_times, command = function, prob = 1 )
    • A shorthand for rerunning a certain command over and over, with prob as a float between 0 and 1 controlling the likelihood that the code actually runs.
    • You can refer to the current iteration of the algorithm via the reserved word: this (see example).
    • The variable i, referring to the current iteration number starting at 0, is also available for use in commands.
    • The variable iters, referring to the total number of iterations, is also available for use in commands.
    • The variable this.original_data, referring to the original data before any iterations are proessed, is also available for use in commands.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').iter(8,()=>{this.delay(ri(1,2000))}).play(); // 8 delay lines between 1 and 2000 samples

  • parallel ( commands = [function, function] )
    • applies multiple commands in parallel to the input FacetPattern. The commands parameter is an array where each entry is a function. Each command is applied to a copy of the original input data, and the results are combined back together afterwards. The final output is normalized to have the same maximum value as the original input data.
    • example: $('s').noise(n4).scale(-1,1).allpass(347).allpass(113).allpass(37).parallel([()=>{this.delay(1687,0.999)},()=>{this.delay(1601,0.999)},()=>{this.delay(2053,0.999)},()=>{this.delay(2251,0.999)}]).play().full(); // schroeder reverb on a quarter note of noise

  • run ( commands = function )
    • equivalent to a sometimes(1,()=>{}) method. See sometimes() below for more details.
    • allows you to run arbitrary JS code on the FacetPattern every loop.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).run(()=>{if(bars%2==0){this.tune('c')}else {this.tune('g')}}).play(); // alternating c and g whole notes made from tuned noise

  • seq ( sequencePattern, commands = function )
    • superposes the samples specified in sequencePattern across the loop. sequencePattern can either be a string or a FacetPattern composed of strings.
    • the character * at the end of a member of the sequencePattern string will select a random sample from that directory (see examples).
    • the character _ in a sequencePattern specifies to insert silence instead of a sample.
    • the commands will run on each sample as it is superposed onto the output pattern.
    • example:
      • $('example').seq('kicks/* hats/* snares/003 hats/003').play(); // random kick, random hat, snares/003, hats/003
      • $('example').seq(_.from(['kicks/003', 'hats*', 'snares/003', 'hats/*']).dup(choose([1, 3, 5, 7])).palindrome().rechunk(8, 0.5), () => {this.log(rf()).delay(ri(n128, n16))}).full().play() // example using commands to proess each sample, and using a FacetPattern as the sequencePattern;

  • slices ( num_slices, command = function, prob = 1, fade_mode = true )
    • slices the FacetPattern into num_slices slices, and for prob percent of those slices, runs command, appending all slices back together. You can refer to the current slice of the algorithm via the reserved word: this (see example).
    • The variable s, referring to the current slice number starting at 0, is also available for use in commands.
    • The variable num_slices, referring to the number of slices, is also available for use in commands.
    • If the FacetPattern's data is >= 1024 samples, the last 1% of each slice will be faded out to prevent clicks in audio slices. If the FacetPattern's data is < 1024 samples, no fading is applied, and each slice is processed exactly as-is.
    • By default, the slices() method applies a very short fadeout on each slice to prevent any clicks that might occur from any code running on each slice. This behavior can be turned off by including a falsy fade_mode value.
    • example:
      • $('example').randsamp('808').slices(32,()=>{this.fft().shift(random()).ifft()}).play();

  • sometimes ( prob, command = function() )
    • runs command only some of the time, at a probability set by prob.
    • command must start with the reserved word: this (see example).
    • example:
      • $('example').phasor(1).sticky(0.5).scale(40,80).sometimes(0.5,()=>this.reverse());

  • subrange ( min, max, command = function() )
    • runs command on a subrange of the FacetPattern, specified by min and max.
    • min and max should be floats between 0 and 1. They are relative values, so a value of 0 means the beginning of the pattern, and a value of 1 means the end of the pattern.
    • command must start with the reserved word: this (see example).
    • example:
      • $('example').tri(200).subrange(0.33,0.66,()=>{this.times(0.25)}).play(); // quieter in the middle third

Methods for image generation and processing

  • layer2d ( brightness_data, xCoords, yCoords, width, height )
    • superposes a FacetPattern in 2 dimensions on top of the existing data in a FacetPattern.
    • brightness_data is a FacetPattern that should be normalized between 0 and 1. It controls how bright the corresponding pixels will be.
    • xCoords and yCoords are FacetPatterns that allow the user to control the x,y position of the pixels in brightness_data.
    • the width and height arguments are optional. They default to the square root of the FacetPattern's length. Other values will rotate the data in a different way, around a different center point.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).size(10000).scale(0,1).layer2d(_.noise(10000), _.ramp(0,100,128), _.ramp(0,100,128)).saveimg('example').once(); // layers a ramp from 0,0 to 100,100 over a sine wave background

  • mutechunks2d ( num_chunks, probabilty )
    • slices the input FacetPattern into chunks chunks in 2D space and mutes prob percent of them.
    • num_chunks must have an integer square root, e.g. 9, 16, 25, 36.
    • example: $('example').sine(0.3,1000).scale(0,1).mutechunks2d(36,0.5).saveimg('example').once();

  • rechunk2d ( num_chunks )
    • slices the input FacetPattern into chunks chunks in 2D space and shuffles the chunks around.
    • num_chunks must have an integer square root, e.g. 9, 16, 25, 36.
    • example: $('example').sine(0.3,1000).scale(0,1).rechunk2d(36).saveimg('example').once();

  • rotate ( angle, width, height )
    • rotates the FacetPattern angle degrees around a center point, as if it were suspended in 2D space.
    • the width and height arguments are optional. They default to the square root of the FacetPattern's length. Other values will rotate the data in a different way, around a different center point.
    • example:
      • $('example').sine(1).scale(0,1).size(512*512).rotate(35).saveimg('example').once(); // rotates a sine wave background 35 degrees

  • saveimg ( filepath, rgbData, width, height )
    • saves the FacetPattern data as a PNG file in the img/ directory or a sub-directory. If a sub-directory is specified in the filepath argument and it doesn't exist, it will be created.
    • the width and height arguments are optional. They default to the square root of the FacetPattern's length. They control the width and height of the PNG image file, in pixels. If the FacetPattern has more data d than there are total pixels p in the image, the data will be truncated after p.
    • the rgbData argument is optional. Without it, the image will be greyscaled. If rgbData is included, it should be an array containing three FacetPatterns normalized to between 0 and 1, representing the R, G, and B amounts. The FacetPattern data will be multipled by the three rgbData patterns to create colored pixels in the image. Values between 0 and 1 will be mapped onto RGB values 0-255.
    • example:
      •   $('example')
          // create black background
          .silence(512 * 512)
          // add the 512 brightest-possible pixels (1s) that will be used to create a circle
          .layer2d(_.from(1).size(512),
          // the circle x coordinates move from left edge (0) to right edge (512) and back
          _.ramp(0, 511, 512)
          .palindrome(),
          // the circle y coordinates, pt. 1: create a half-circle out of 512 values, defaulting to between 0 and 1
          _.circle(1)
          .size(512)
          // the circle y coordinates, pt. 2: append another half-circle out of 512 values, scaled between -1 and 0 and inverted
          .append(_.circle(1)
          .size(512)
          .scale(-1, 0)
          .invert())
          // scale the y coordinates so they move between 0 and 511
          .scale(0, 511))
          .saveimg('circle',
            // use 3 random ramps, 1 for each RGB channel, to create a gradient in the circle's pixels
            [_.ramp(rf(),rf(),512),_.ramp(rf(),rf(),512),_.ramp(rf(),rf(),512)]
          )
          .once();
        

  • shift2d ( xAmt, yAmt, width )
    • shifts the FacetPattern in 2D space, by xAmt pixels to the left/right, and by yAmt pixels up/down.
    • the width argument is optional. It defaults to the square root of the FacetPattern's length. Other values will shift the data in a different way.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(100*100).prob(0.001).iter(4,()=>{this.mix(0.5,()=>{this.shift2d(0,1)})}).saveimg('example').once(); // slides all the pixels up 4

  • size2d ( size )
    • creates a smaller image of the FacetPattern in 2D Space, according to the relative amount size.
    • size must be between 0 and 1. The new pattern will be a smaller 2D image of the input, surrounded by padding of black pixels (0s).
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(10000).size2d(0.5).saveimg('example'); // 100 x 100 image with a square of noise in the center

  • spectro ( filePath, windowSize = 2048 )
    • saves a PNG file in the img/ directory named fileName.png, with the FacetPattern's spectrogram.
    • example:
      • $('example').noise(n1).ffilter(_.ramp(0,NYQUIST/2),_.ramp(NYQUIST,NYQUIST/2)).spectro('mytri'+Date.now()).once();