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docker-for-mac-openvpn
ingress-nginx
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README.md

README.md

Development Toolkit for Kubernetes on Docker for Mac

Docker for Mac (on Edge channel) includes a local Kubernetes cluster which is very delightful for test and development. Refer to the official document (https://docs.docker.com/docker-for-mac/#kubernetes) to know how to get it up and running.

If you are using Kubernetes on Docker for Mac, some scripts in this repository might be helpful.

Table of Content

Pod/Docker Network Access

Because the Docker for Mac containers are actually running in a VM powered by HyperKit, you can't directly have interactions with the containers. More details here, Docker for Mac - Networking - Known limitations, use cases, and workarounds.

To solve this problem, run an OpenVPN server container inside the VM with host network mode, then you can reach the containers with its internal IP. You can run the OpenVPN server with docker-compose or on Kubernetes.

Off course you can follow the docker-compose approach without Kubernetes.

Generally, it works like this:

Mac <-> Tunnelblick <-> socat/service <-> OpenVPN Server <-> Containers

Prepare

  1. Install Tunnelblick (an open source GUI OpenVPN client for Mac).

  2. Change into the docker-for-mac-openvpn directory.

Run OpenVPN on Kubernetes (Approach #1)

  1. Install helm (the package manager for Kubernetes).

  2. Create local values file at local/values.yaml and specify local dirs.

dirPaths:
  # The project dir.
  data: /tmp/docker-for-mac-kubernetes-devkit/docker-for-mac-openvpn
  # Local dir to hold generated files.
  local: /tmp/docker-for-mac-kubernetes-devkit/docker-for-mac-openvpn/local
  # Local dir to hold generated server configs.
  configs: /tmp/docker-for-mac-kubernetes-devkit/docker-for-mac-openvpn/local/configs
  1. Run the OpenVPN server.
$ helm install -n docker-for-mac-openvpn --namespace docker-for-mac -f local/values.yaml .

Run OpenVPN server with docker-compose (Approach #2)

Run the OpenVPN server, it'll generate certificates and configurations at the first time, maybe a little slow.

$ # Run
$ docker-compose up -d
$ # Follow logs
$ docker-compose logs -f

Configure Client

Now, you will get the client config file at ./local/docker-for-mac.ovpn. Add the subnets that you want to reach at bottom of the client config like below, and connect to the local OpenVPN server.

route 192.168.65.0 255.255.255.0
route 10.96.0.0 255.240.0.0

Test Network

Run a container and access to it directory with it's IP address.

$ # Start Nginx
$ docker run --rm -it nginx

$ # Find out the IP address
$ docker inspect `docker ps | grep nginx | awk '{print $1}'` | grep '"IPAddress"'
"IPAddress": "172.16.0.11",

$ # Visit
$ curl http://172.16.0.11
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<title>Welcome to nginx!</title>
...

Nginx Ingress Controller

In most times, a Kubernetes ingress controller is needed to manage all traffic, but there's no cloud available for a Mac.

If you define your service type as LoadBalancer in Kubernetes, Docker for Mac will open a port on host machine. So we can deploy the Nginx Ingress Controller to serve and dispatch requests.

First of all, stop anything that listing on port 80 or 443.

$ kubectl apply -f ingress-nginx/namespaces
namespace "ingress-nginx" created

$ kubectl apply -f ingress-nginx/configmaps
configmap "nginx-configuration" created
configmap "tcp-services" created
configmap "udp-services" created

$ kubectl apply -f ingress-nginx/deployments
deployment "default-http-backend" created
deployment "nginx-ingress-controller" created

$ kubectl apply -f ingress-nginx/services
service "default-http-backend" created
service "nginx-ssl" created
service "nginx" created

Now nginx ingress controller is listing on port 80 and 443, visit http://127.0.0.1 will see the default HTTP backend.

$ curl http://127.0.0.1
default backend - 404

Check the ingress controller.

$ kubectl get all -n ingress-nginx
NAME                              DESIRED   CURRENT   UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
deploy/default-http-backend       1         1         1            1           21m
deploy/nginx-ingress-controller   1         1         1            1           21m

NAME                                     DESIRED   CURRENT   READY     AGE
rs/default-http-backend-55c6c69b88       1         1         1         21m
rs/nginx-ingress-controller-579f8bf799   1         1         1         21m

NAME                              DESIRED   CURRENT   UP-TO-DATE   AVAILABLE   AGE
deploy/default-http-backend       1         1         1            1           21m
deploy/nginx-ingress-controller   1         1         1            1           21m

NAME                                     DESIRED   CURRENT   READY     AGE
rs/default-http-backend-55c6c69b88       1         1         1         21m
rs/nginx-ingress-controller-579f8bf799   1         1         1         21m

NAME                                           READY     STATUS    RESTARTS   AGE
po/default-http-backend-55c6c69b88-9rcr7       1/1       Running   0          21m
po/nginx-ingress-controller-579f8bf799-4pfjk   1/1       Running   0          21m

NAME                       TYPE           CLUSTER-IP       EXTERNAL-IP   PORT(S)         AGE
svc/default-http-backend   ClusterIP      10.110.153.121   <none>        80/TCP          21m
svc/nginx                  LoadBalancer   10.100.205.59    localhost     80:31764/TCP    21m
svc/nginx-ssl              LoadBalancer   10.108.87.129    localhost     443:30592/TCP   21m

License

The Apache License (Version 2.0, January 2004).

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