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README.md

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assert-match

assert-match is the enhancement of the standard assert module with matchers.

Short example

import assert from 'assert-match'
import { loose, arrayOf, type } from 'assert-match/matchers'
// or const { loose, arrayOf, type } = assert.matchers

const actual = {
        str: 'abc',
        obj: { b: 1, c: 2 },
        nums: [ 1, 2, 'x' ],
    },
    expected = {
        str: 'abc',
        obj: loose({ b: 1 }),
        nums: arrayOf(type('number')),
    }

assert.deepEqual(actual, expected)

//  AssertionError: { str: 'abc', obj: { b: 1 }, nums: [ 1, 2, 'x' ] } deepEqual
//  { str: 'abc',  obj: { b: 1 }, nums: [ 1, 2, { '[typeof]': 'number' } ] }
//        + expected - actual
//
//         {
//           "nums": [
//             1
//             2
//        -    "x"
//        +    {
//        +      "[typeof]": "number"
//        +    }
//           ]

Installation

    npm install assert-match

Usage

Use assert-match in all the same places where you would use built-in assert:

const assert = require('assert-match')

// ...

assert.deepEqual(actual, expected)

Assertions

assert-match enhances standard assert's deep-family assertions:

  • assert.deepEqual (actual, expected, [message])
  • assert.deepStrictEqual (actual, expected, [message])
  • assert.notDeepEqual (actual, expected, [message])
  • assert.notDeepStrictEqual (actual, expected, [message])

assert-match allows you to check actual value (or its property) not against a specific expected value as standard deep assertions do, but against a matcher or a combination of them. Without using matchers these assertions behave exactly like their standard counterparts which has been tested against the same set of tests as the standard ones.

Other assertions of assert are also exported by assert-match but not enhanced with matchers support.

Matchers

A matcher is an objects used to check if a value satisfies some requirements defined by the matcher.

Matchers can be placed on the top level of expected value or on some of its properties.

An awesome point about matchers is the ability to combine them! It gives you a way to create powerful matching structures using small set of matchers.

Matchers and combinations of them can be reused and recombined across multiple assertions.

In cases of assertion errors matchers participate in providing your test runner with error details.

assert-match defines the following matchers:

In all of the following matchers descriptions actual refers to actual value or its property, corresponding to the matcher in expected, both passed to an assertion.

strict (expected)

Returns an instance of the root matchers class. All other matchers inherit from that class. It checks whether two values are equal in depth. Actual comparison operator (== or ===) for primitives depends on assertion in which this matcher is used (for example, == is used for deepEqual whereas === is used for deepStrictEqual). If expected contains a matcher somewhere on it, then check for corresponding actual value is passed to that matcher. If applied to another matcher it produces equivalent one, meaning that for example strict(aMatcher(expected)) returns matcher equivalent to aMatcher(expected). Actually, deepEqual and deepStrictEqual assertions wrap its expected argument in strict matcher implicitly.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, strict({ a: 1, b: 2 }))   // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, strict({ a: 1 }))         // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, strict({ a: 1, b: 2 }))         // throws

loose (expected)

Similar to strict matcher but requires only subset of actual properties to be equal in depth to those of expected.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, loose({ a: 1, b: 2 }))     // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, loose({ a: 1 }))           // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, loose({ a: 1, b: 2 }))           // throws

any (expected)

Matches anything. Can be used if value or existence of a specific actual property does not matter. It is supposed to be used in context of strict matcher, in context of loose matcher it makes a little sense.

assert.deepEqual(undefined, any())                                  // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }, { a: 1, b: 2, c: any() })    // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }, { a: 1, b: 5, c: any() })    // throws

not (expected)

It implicitly wraps expected in strict matcher, matches actual value against it and inverts result. notDeepEqual and notDeepStrictEqual assertions wrap its expected argument in not matcher implicitly.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, not({ a: 1, b: 2 }))  // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, not({ a: 1 }))        // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, not({ a: 1, b: 2 }))        // passes

every (expected)

expected should be an array. If it is not, than it is treated as one-element array. Each element of expected array is wrapped implicitly in strict matcher. every matcher checks whether actual value matches all matchers of expected.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, every([ loose({ a: 1 }), loose({ b: 2 }) ]))   // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, every([ loose({ a: 1 }), loose({ c: 3 }) ]))   // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, every([ { c: 3 } ]))                           // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, every(loose({ a: 1 })))                        // passes

some (expected)

expected should be an array. If it is not, than it is treated as one-element array. Each element of expected array is wrapped implicitly in strict matcher. some matcher checks whether actual value matches at least one matcher of expected.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, some([ loose({ a: 1 }), loose({ b: 2 }) ]))    // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, some([ loose({ a: 1 }), loose({ c: 3 }) ]))    // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, some([ { c: 3 } ]))                            // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1, b: 2 }, some(loose({ a: 1 })))                         // passes

arrayOf (expected)

Expects actual value to be a non-empty array, check fails if it is not. Implicitly wraps expected in strict matcher. Checks that all elements of the array match expected.

assert.deepEqual([ 1, 1, 1 ], arrayOf(1))   // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 1, 'a' ], arrayOf(1)) // throws
assert.deepEqual(1, arrayOf(1))             // throws

contains (expected1 [, expected2, ...])

Expects actual value to be a non-empty array, check fails if it is not. Accepts a list of expected. Checks that each element of the expected list matches at least one element in the actual array.

assert.deepEqual([ 1, 1, 1 ], contains(1))       // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 'a', 'a' ], contains(1))   // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 'a', 'a', 'a' ], contains(1)) // throws
assert.deepEqual(1, contains(1))                 // throws
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], contains(1, 2))    // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], contains(1, 10))   // throws

type (expected)

if expected is a string than actual is checked to be a primitive of that type. If expected is a constructor than actual is checked to be an instance of that type.

assert.deepEqual(5, type('number'))            // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], type(Array))     // passes
assert.deepEqual(5, type('string'))            // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, type({ a: 1 }))     // throws

primitive (expected)

If expected is a matcher than actual is converted to primitive and matched against expected. Otherwise, actual and expected both converted to primitive and compared (actual operator == or === depends on assertion used).

assert.deepEqual({}, primitive('[object Object]'))              // passes
assert.deepEqual(new String('abc'), primitive('abc'))           // passes
assert.deepEqual({ toString: () => 'abc' }, primitive('abc'))   // passes
assert.deepEqual(1, primitive(1))                               // passes
assert.deepEqual(10, primitive(1))                              // throws
assert.deepEqual(1, primitive('1'))                             // passes
assert.deepStrictEqual(1, primitive('1'))                       // throws
assert.deepEqual({}, primitive(regex('obj')))                   // passes
assert.deepEqual({}, primitive(regex('abc')))                   // throws

regex (expected)

expected is converted to a RegExp and actual is tested against it.

assert.deepEqual('abc', regex('^a'))               // passes
assert.deepEqual('[object Object]', regex({}))     // passes
assert.deepEqual('123', regex(/^\d+$/))            // passes
assert.deepEqual('123', regex('^\D+$'))            // throws

gt (expected)

Checks if actual is greater than expected.

assert.deepEqual('b', gt('a'))                              // passes
assert.deepEqual('a', gt('b'))                              // throws
assert.deepEqual(1, gt(0))                                  // passes
assert.deepEqual(0, gt(0))                                  // throws
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], loose({ length: gt(1) }))     // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1 ], loose({ length: gt(1) }))           // throws

gte (expected)

Checks if actual is greater than or equal to expected.

assert.deepEqual('b', gte('a'))                             // passes
assert.deepEqual('a', gte('b'))                             // throws
assert.deepEqual(1, gte(0))                                 // passes
assert.deepEqual(0, gte(0))                                 // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], loose({ length: gte(1) }))    // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1 ], loose({ length: gte(1) }))          // passes

lt (expected)

Checks if actual is less than expected.

assert.deepEqual('a', lt('b'))                              // passes
assert.deepEqual('b', lt('a'))                              // throws
assert.deepEqual(0, lt(1))                                  // passes
assert.deepEqual(0, lt(0))                                  // throws
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], loose({ length: lt(1) }))     // throws
assert.deepEqual([ 1 ], loose({ length: lt(1) }))           // throws

lte (expected)

Checks if actual is less than or equal to expected.

assert.deepEqual('a', lte('b'))                             // passes
assert.deepEqual('b', lte('a'))                             // throws
assert.deepEqual(0, lte(1))                                 // passes
assert.deepEqual(0, lte(0))                                 // passes
assert.deepEqual([ 1, 2, 3 ], loose({ length: lte(1) }))    // throws
assert.deepEqual([ 1 ], loose({ length: lte(1) }))          // passes

custom (expectedFn)

If expectedFn is not a function than this matcher falls back to strict matcher. An actual value is passed to expectedFn to check. expectedFn should return either boolean result or an object with the match and expected fields. boolean match property says whether check passed and expected is used in error reporting. It is possible to return from custom expectedFn results of another matcher.

assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, custom( actual => actual.a === 1) )      // passes
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, custom( actual => actual.a !== 1) )      // throws
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, custom( actual => ({                     // passes
    match: actual.a === 1,
    expected: 1,
}) ))
assert.deepEqual({ a: 1 }, custom( actual => ({                     // throws
    match: actual.a !== 1,
    expected: '["a" should not be equal to 1]',
}) ))

// return results of another matcher
assert.deepEqual([1, 1, 1], custom(                                 // passes
    (actual, comparator) => arrayOf(gt(0)).match(actual, comparator)
))
assert.deepEqual([1, 1, 'a'], custom(                               // throws
    (actual, comparator) => arrayOf(1).match(actual, comparator)
))

FAQ

Why enhancing assert with matchers?

There are cases when you care more not about specific values but rather about their shapes or features. assert-match provides you with a way to achieve that through matchers.

Why yet another matchers?

Existing assertion libraries provide you with tons of crazy named matchers and each new use case requires them (or you) to introduce completely new matcher. On the other hand assert-match provides you with succinct set of combinable matchers, sufficient to reproduce all the matchers of that libs in a clear way.

Why does matchers are strict by default?

The more strict your tests the less probability to introduce bugs into your system and the more probability to detect them. However, as noted above, there are cases when you care more not about specific values but rather about their shapes or features. assert-match tries to consistently address these two points.

What about power-assert?

Yes, we have it >:3.

Why no extension API?

For matchers to be combinable means that not many of them can not be expressed by existing ones, so this feature would not be in great demand. Additionally, custom matcher may be used for this purpose to some extent. However, you are always welcome to issues to provide your points why this or any other feature is required.

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