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TypeScript 1.7 annotations (decorators) for AngularJS 1.x
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Add support for Angular >=1.5.x Component
Latest commit 70b5bb2 Jun 9, 2017

README.md

Angular-TypeScript

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TypeScript 1.7+ annotations (decorators) for AngularJS 1.x

What ?

angular-typescript provides annotation like decorators:

@at.service(moduleName: string, serviceName: string)
@at.inject(dependencyOne: string, ...dependencies?: string[])
@at.component(moduleName: string, componentName: string)
@at.controller(moduleName: string, controllerName: string)
@at.directive(moduleName: string, directiveName: string)
@at.classFactory(moduleName: string, className: string)
@at.resource(moduleName: string, resourceClassName: string)

Why ?

Purpose of those decorators is to remove some ugly boilerplate from AngularJS applications written in TypeScript.

How ?

Service

Now one have to:

class SomeService {

    constructor() {
        // do stuff $http and $parse
    }
    
    public someMethod(anArg: number): boolean {
        // do some stuff
    }

}

angular.module('ngModuleName').service('someService', SomeService);

Using angular-typescript it will look like:

@service('ngModuleName', 'someService')
class SomeService {

    constructor() {
        // do stuff
    }
    
    public someMethod(anArg: number): boolean {
        // do some stuff
    }

}

Inject

@service('ngModuleName', 'someServiceName')
class SomeService {

    constructor(
        @inject('$http') $http: angular.IHttpService,
        @inject('$parse') private $$parse: angular.IParseService
    ) {
        // do stuff with $http and $$parse;
    }
    
    public someMethod(anArg: number): boolean {
        // do some stuff with this.$$parse
    }

}

or

@service('ngModuleName', 'someServiceName')
@inject('$http', '$parse')
class SomeService {

    constructor(
        $http: angular.IHttpService, 
        private $$parse: angular.IParseService
    ) {
        // do stuff with $http and $$parse;
    }
    
    public someMethod(anArg: number): boolean {
        // do some stuff with this.$$parse();
    }

}

Component

Static class members of component controller are used as component config object.

@component('ngModuleName', 'atSomeComponent')
class SomeComponentController {

    public static bindings: Object = {
      someBinding: '@'  
    };
    public static template: string = '<div><h1>{{ $ctrl.someBinding }}</h1></div>';
    // or
    public static templateUrl: string = './some-component.html';

    constructor(
        @inject('$scope') private $$scope: angular.IScope,
        @inject('$parse') private $$parse: angular.IParseService
    ) {
        // do stuff with $$scope and $$parse;
    }

}

Controller

@controller('ngModuleName', 'SomeController')
class SomeController {

    constructor(
        @inject('$scope') $scope: angular.IScope,
        @inject('$parse') private $$parse: angular.IParseService
    ) {
        // do stuff with $scope and $$parse;
    }
    
    public someMethod(anArg: number): boolean {
        // do some stuff with this.$$parse();
    }

}

Directive

Static class members of directive controller are used as config directive config.

@directive('ngModuleName', 'atSomeDirective')
class SomeDirectiveController {

    public static controllerAs: 'someDirectiveCtrl';
    public static templateUrl: string = '/partials/some-directive.html';
    public static link: angular.IDirectiveLinkFn = (scope, element, attrs, ctrl: SomeDirectiveController) => {
        ctrl.init(attrs.atSomeDirective);
    };

    constructor(
        @inject('$scope') private $$scope: angular.IScope,
        @inject('$parse') private $$parse: angular.IParseService
    ) {
        // do stuff with $$scope and $$parse;
    }
    
    public init(anArg: string): boolean {
        // do some stuff with this.$$parse and this.$$scope
    }

}

ClassFactory

If you use constructors/classes to create common entities a @classFactory can be useful. It passes constructor as angular service and attaches @inject's to it's prototype with leading '$$'.

@classFactory('test', 'Headers')
@inject('$http', '$parse')
class Headers {

    public accept: string;

    private $$http: angular.IHttpService;
    private $$parse: angular.IParseService;

    constructor() {
        this.accept = this.$$parse('defaults.headers.common.Accept')(this.$$http);
    }

}

and the somewhere else:

constructor(
        @inject('Headers') Headers: Headers
    ) {
        this.headers = new Headers();
    }
    …

Resource

This one is somehow similar to @classFactory, but it also encapsulates magic powers of angular $resource. $resource configs are gathered from static class members (just like in @directive decorator).

@resource('test', 'UserResource')
@inject('$http', '$parse')
class UserResource extends at.Resource {

    public static url: string = '/fake/url';

    public name: string;
    public age: number;

    private $$http: angular.IHttpService;
    private $$parse: angular.IParseService;

    constructor(model?: ITestModel) {
        if (model) {
            this.name = model.name;
            this.age = model.age;
        }
    }

    public getLabel(): string {
        return `${ this.name }-${ String(this.age) }`;
    }

}