Skip to content
master
Switch branches/tags
Code

Files

Permalink
Failed to load latest commit information.
Type
Name
Latest commit message
Commit time
 
 
 
 
 
 
ci
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

published

Genie Parser

Genie is both a library framework and a test harness that facilitates rapid development, encourages re-usability, and simplifies writing test automation. Genie bundled with the modular architecture of pyATS framework accelerates and simplifies test automation leveraging all the perks of the Python programming language in an object-orienting fashion.

pyATS is an end-to-end testing ecosystem, specializing in data-driven and reusable testing, and engineered to be suitable for Agile, rapid development iterations. Extensible by design, pyATS enables developers to start with small, simple and linear test cases, and scale towards large, complex and asynchronous test suites.

Genie was initially developed internally in Cisco, and is now available to the general public starting early 2018 through Cisco DevNet.

This is a sub-component of Genie that parses the device output into structured datastructure.

Installation

The package is automatically installed when pyATS gets installed

$ pip install 'pyats[full]'

Detailed installation guide can be found on [our website]. [our website]: https://developer.cisco.com/site/pyats/

Development

To develop this package, assuming you have Genie already installed in your environment, follow the commands below:

# clone this repo
bash$ git clone https://github.com/CiscoTestAutomation/genieparser.git

# source pyats environment
bash$ source /path/to/pyats_workspace/env.sh (or env.csh)

# put all packages in dev mode
bash$ cd genieparser
bash$ make develop

Now you should be able to develop the files and see it reflected in your runs.

ChangeLog

Change logs can be found here.

To contributors:

Guide

YouTube Video: <How to write a Genie parser for Cisco!> https://youtube.com/watch?v=ibLNilSfdTc (Thank you! @Jmahaja1)

Once you create a new parser, don't forget to check 1, 2, and 3; if you only update the parser class without modifying/creating the schema, please check 2 and 3.

  • 1. make json
  • 2. create changelog for your pull request.
  • 3. make sure GitHub Actions checks passed.

How to write a 'changelog' for your contribution:

  1. Become familiarized with the examples at changelog/undistributed/template.rst. Changelogs must be written in the same style as the examples found there:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Fix
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
* NXOS
    * Modified ShowVersion:
        * Changed <key1>, <key2> from schema to Optional.
        * Updated regex pattern <p1> to accommodate various outputs.

When writing about what was changed, avoid using vague statements such as 'Updated regex' or 'Fixed bug'. If modifying an existing parser, then specify the schema keys and regex patterns that have been changed.

  1. The changelog (singular) that accompanies a contribution must have a unique file name and be in genieparser/changelog/undistributed/. If you need help generating a unique file name, then enter the following bash/terminal command to generate a sufficiently unique number (linux and mac only):
$ date "+%Y%m%d%H%M%S"

Put a short description in the name of the changelog file and then appended this number at the end of the file. For example, genieparser/changelog/undistributed/changelog_show_interface_iosxe_20200807212611.rst

Common Regex Patterns

This is a list of common patterns that are useful to use when writing a parser. This list is by no means exhaustive, and the patterns strike a balance between size and specificity. Remember to check this section for updates as we add new patterns.

You can help improve this list by expanding it. Everyone is welcome to contribute and extend the list with knew helpful patterns and ideas.

general patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
ipv4 ipv4 address, this will match any pattern of three groups of 1-3 numbers separated by dots \d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3} 0.0.0.0
192.168.0.1
255.255.255
please note: it will also match invalid addresses like 999.999.999
ipv4 with subnet ipv4 address with a subnet at the end \d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\/\d{1,2} 10.0.0.0/8
192.168.0.1/16
255.255.255/32
please note: it will also match invalid addresses like 999.999.999/64
ipv6 simple ipv6 pattern, exhaustive ipv6 patterns are very long and unnecessary most of the time [a-fA-F\d\:]+ fe80::1
::2
2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334
please note: it will also match invalid addresses like ::::0
a::02345678::0::0
ipv6 with subnet ipv6 with a subnet at the end [a-fA-F\d\:]+\/\d{1,3} ::2/128
2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334/64
please note: it will also match invalid addresses like ::2/256
::::0/999
a::02345678::0::0/001
mac (1) mac addresses with dot delimiter ([a-fA-F\d]{4}\.){2}[a-fA-F\d]{4} aaaa.bbbb.cccc
AAAA.BBBB.CCCC
1a2b.3c4d.5e6f
mac (2) mac addresses with colon delimiter (([a-fA-F\d]{2}:){5}[a-fA-F\d]{2}) aa:bb:cc:dd:ee:ff
AA:BB:CC:DD:EE:FF
a1:b2:c3:d4:e5:f6
unit measurement matches floats that represent a unit, like the current temperature or power, these options can usually also be N/A [\dNAna\/-\.]+ -5.00 C
2.97 V
-2.30 dBm
please note: the pattern will only match the number part and not the unit
interface name matches the characters that can compose an interface name [\w\/\.\-\:]+ Port-channel10
HundredGigE1/0/35.12
Serial1/0/2:0
ucse1/0/0
FastEthernet1
time stamp basic hh:mm timestamp regex, can be extended to more complex timestamps easily \d{1,2}:\d{2} 1:30
02:45
12:30
please note: it will also match invalid examples like 99:99
10:80

General Option List Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
link state whether a link is up or down, this list can be used as a base when something has a similar but expanded set of states, consider using with the case insensitive flag up|down|administratively up|administratively down up
down
administratively up
administratively down
enabled status for all situations that use enable and disable, also useful as base when there are further options [e|E]nabled|[d|D]isabled enabled
Enabled
disabled
Disabled
duplex state used to match the state of the duplex, may need to be adjusted for different show commands that output duplex differently (auto|full|half)?[-\s]?([d|D]uplex|unknown) half-duplex
full Duplex
auto duplex
full-Duplex

ACL Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
acl name all the characters that can compose an acl name [\w-\.#]+ ipv4_acl
mac_acl
#1
acl target can be any, or host and then an ip or mac address any|(host (\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3})|([a-fA-F\d]{4}\.){2}[a-fA-F\d]{4}) any
host 192.168.0.1
host aaaa.bbbb.cccc
acl operator the match action of the acl in a convenient list eq|gt|lt|neq|range eq
lt
range
acl action whether the acl results in allowing or stopping the flow of traffic permit|deny permit
deny
acl message type the possible message types acls can match in a convenient list ttl-exceeded|unreachable|packet-too-big|echo-reply|echo|router-advertisement|mld-query+ unreachable
router-advertisement
echo
acl protocols the possible protocols acls can match in a convenient list ip|ipv6|tcp|udp|ahp|esp|hbh|icmp|pcp|sctp ip
tcp
icmp

Access Point and Wireless Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
ap power the current radio power of the access point in dBm [-\d+]+\s+dBm 1 dBm
-80 dBm
ap band The current band of the access point in GHz [\d\.]+\s+GHz 2.4 GHz
5 GHz
ap setting status whether a feature or setting on the access point is enabled or disabled, or not configured at all ([e|E]nabled)|([d|D]isabled)|(Not Configured) enabled
Disabled
Not Configured

BGP Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
bgp as path the autonomous system path of the bgp route [\d\s\{\}]+ 0 200 33299 51178 47751 {27016}
0 {62112 33492 4872 41787 13166 50081 21461 58376 29755 1135}
bgp next hop the next hop of the bgp route, it normally matches ipv4 and ipv6 addresses, but it can also handle bgp path prefixes [\w\.\:\/\[\]\,]+ 10.4.1.1
:FFFF:10.4.1.1
bgp path type possible bgp path types in a convenient list i|e|c|l|a|r|I e
l
I
bgp origin code possible bgp origin codes in a convenient list i|e|?|\| e
?
|

MPLS Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
ldp id ldp id is just an ipv4 address with a colon and numbers at the end \d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}:\d+ 10.169.197.252:0
please note: it will also match invalid addresses like 999.999.999:0001
mpls active state possible mpls states are active, passive, and active/passive active|passive|active\/passive active
passive
active/passive

OSPF Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
ospf advertising state whether a route is being advertised or not Advertise|DoNotAdvertise Advertise
DoNotAdvertise
ospf packet type possible ospf packet types in a convenient list Invalid|Hello|DB des|LS req|LS upd|LS ack Hello
LS upd
Invalid

VLAN Patterns

pattern name description pattern examples
vlan status possible vlan statuses in a convenient list active|suspended|(.*)lshut|(.*)unsup active
suspended
act/unsup
act/lshut
vlan list matches vlan lists [\d\-\,]+ 1,2,3,4,5
1-5
1,2,3-5,6,7,8-10
port channel state possible port channel states in a convenient list passive|active|on|off passive
active
off

Copyright (c) 2021 Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates

About

sub-component of Genie that parse the device output into structured datastructure

Topics

Resources

License

Releases

No releases published

Packages

No packages published

Languages