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Spring factories for elasticsearch
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Latest commit cef28dc Feb 16, 2016 @dadoonet Update to elasticsearch 2.2.0
Closes #93.

README.md

Spring factories for Elasticsearch

Welcome to the Spring factories for Elasticsearch project.

Actually, since version 1.4.1, this project has been split in two parts:

  • Elasticsearch Beyonder which find resources in project classpath to automatically create indices, types and templates.
  • This project which is building Client and Node beans using Spring framework.

Documentation

  • For 2.x elasticsearch versions, you are reading the latest documentation.
  • For 1.x elasticsearch versions, look at es-1.5 branch.
  • For 0.x elasticsearch versions, look at 0.x branch.
spring-elasticsearch elasticsearch Spring Release date
2.1.0 2.0, 2.1 4.2.3 2015-11-25
2.0.0 2.0 4.1.4 2015-10-25
1.4.2 < 2.0 4.1.4 2015-03-03
1.4.1 1.4 4.1.4 2015-02-28
1.4.0 1.4 4.1.4 2015-01-03
1.3.0 1.3 4.0.6 2014-09-01
1.0.0 1.0 3.2.2 2014-02-14

Build Status

Thanks to Travis for the build status: Build Status

Getting Started

Maven dependency

Import spring-elasticsearch in you project pom.xml file:

<dependency>
  <groupId>fr.pilato.spring</groupId>
  <artifactId>spring-elasticsearch</artifactId>
  <version>2.1.0</version>
</dependency>

If you want to set a specific version of elasticsearch, add it to your pom.xml file:

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.elasticsearch</groupId>
  <artifactId>elasticsearch</artifactId>
  <version>2.1.0</version>
</dependency>

Logger

We are using slf4j for logging but you have to provide the logging implementation you want to use and bind it.

For example for this project we are using for tests log4j2. If you want to do so, add to your pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.logging.log4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>log4j-1.2-api</artifactId>
    <version>2.4.1</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.logging.log4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>log4j-slf4j-impl</artifactId>
    <version>2.4.1</version>
</dependency>
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.logging.log4j</groupId>
    <artifactId>log4j-core</artifactId>
    <version>2.4.1</version>
</dependency>

Using elasticsearch spring namespace for XML files

In your spring context file, just add namespaces like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:util="http://www.springframework.org/schema/util"
    xmlns:elasticsearch="http://www.pilato.fr/schema/elasticsearch"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/util http://www.springframework.org/schema/util/spring-util-3.0.xsd
        http://www.pilato.fr/schema/elasticsearch http://www.pilato.fr/schema/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-0.4.xsd">
</beans>

Define a client Transport bean

In your spring context file, just define a client like this:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" />

By default, you will get an Elasticsearch Transport Client connected to an Elasticsearch node already running at localhost:9300 using elasticsearch as cluster name.

You can set the nodes you want to connect to:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" esNodes="localhost:9300,localhost:9301" />

Important notes

Note that you should define the same clustername as the one you defined on your running nodes. Otherwise, your Transport Client won't connect to the node. See Elasticsearch properties.

Note also that you must define the transport client port (9300-9399) and not the REST port (9200-9299). Transport client does not use REST API.

Define a node and get a node client bean

In your spring context file, just define a node like this:

<elasticsearch:node id="esNode" />

By default, it will build an Elasticsearch Node running at localhost:9300.

Then, you can ask the node to give you a client.

<elasticsearch:client node="esNode" id="esClient" />

You will get an Elasticsearch Node Client.

Injecting client in your java project

Now, you can use the client (either the node) in your java classes.

import org.elasticsearch.client.Client;

Client client = ctx.getBean("esClient", Client.class);

Better, you should use @Autowired annotation.

// if you really need it and have started a node using the factory
@Autowired Node node;

// Inject your client...
@Autowired Client client;

Elasticsearch properties

You can define your client properties using a property file such as:

cluster.name=myclustername

And load it in Spring context:

<util:properties id="esproperties"
    location="classpath:fr/pilato/spring/elasticsearch/xml/esclient-transport.properties"/>

Note that you can also define properties as follow:

<util:map id="esProperties">
    <entry key="cluster.name" value="newclustername"/>
</util:map>

Injecting properties in node and client is now easy:

<elasticsearch:node id="esNode" properties="esproperties" />
<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" properties="esproperties" />

Transport Client Properties

You can (you should) define your nodes settings when using a transport client:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" esNodes="localhost:9300,localhost:9301" />

You can also add plugins to the transport client in case it needs it:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" plugins="org.elasticsearch.plugin.deletebyquery.DeleteByQueryPlugin" />

Node Client Properties

You can define your running node from which you want to get a client:

<elasticsearch:node id="esNode" properties="esproperties" />
<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" node="esNode" />

Common Client properties

For both TransportClient and NodeClient, you can define many properties to manage automatic creation of index, mappings, templates and aliases.

Managing indexes and types

If you want to manage indexes and types at startup (creating missing indexes/types and applying mappings):

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" node="esNode"
    mappings="twitter/tweet" />

This will create an Elasticsearch Client that will check when starting that index twitter exists and tweet type is defined.

If you need to manage more than one type or index, just use a comma separated list:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" node="esNode"
    mappings="twitter/tweet,twitter/user,facebook/user" />

If you add in your classpath a file named es/twitter/_settings.json, it will be automatically applied to define settings for your twitter index.

For example, create the following file src/main/resources/es/twitter/_settings.json in your project:

{
  "index" : {
    "number_of_shards" : 3,
    "number_of_replicas" : 2
  }
}

Also, if you define a file named es/twitter/tweet.json, it will be automatically applied as the mapping for the tweet type in the twitter index.

For example, create the following file src/main/resources/es/twitter/tweet.json in your project:

{
  "tweet" : {
    "properties" : {
      "message" : {"type" : "string", "store" : "yes"}
    }
  }
}

Using convention over configuration

By default, the factory will find every mapping file located under es directory. So, if you have a mapping file named es/twitter/tweet.json in your classpath, it will be automatically used by the factory without defining anything:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" />

You can disable this automatic lookup by setting the autoscan property to false:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" autoscan="false" mappings="twitter/tweet" />

Creating aliases to indexes

When creating an index, it could be useful to add an alias on it. For example, if you planned to have indexes per year for twitter feeds (twitter2012, twitter2013, twitter2014) and you want to define an alias named twitter, you can use the aliases property:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient"
    aliases="twitter:twitter2012,twitter:twitter2013,twitter:twitter2014" />

Creating templates

Sometimes it's useful to define a template mapping that will automatically be applied to new indices created.

For example, if you planned to have indexes per year for twitter feeds (twitter2012, twitter2013, twitter2014) and you want to define a template named twitter_template, you can use the templates property:

<!--
    We add also a facebook_template template just for showing how to
    define more than one template...
-->
<elasticsearch:client id="esClient"
    templates="twitter_template,facebook_template" />

To configure your template you have to define a file named es/_template/twitter_template.json in your project:

{
    "template" : "twitter*",
    "settings" : {
        "number_of_shards" : 1
    },
    "mappings" : {
        "tweet" : {
            "properties" : {
                "message" : {
                    "type" : "string",
                    "store" : "yes"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Changing classpath search path for mapping and settings files

By default, the factory look in es classpath folder to find if there is index settings or mappings definitions. If you need to change it, you can use the classpathRoot property:

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" classpathRoot="myownfolder" />

So, if a myownfolder/twitter/_settings.xml file exists in your classpath, it will be used by the factory.

Merge mappings

If you need to merge mapping for an existing type, set mergeMapping property to true.

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" mergeMapping="true" />

If merging fails, the factory will not start (BeanCreationException will be raised with a MergeMappingException cause).

Merge settings

If you need to merge settings for an existing index, add a file named es/twitter/_update_settings.json in your classpath. The factory will detect it and will try to merge settings unless you explicitly set mergeSettings to false.

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" mergeSettings="false" />

If merging fails, the factory will not start.

Force rebuild indices (use with caution)

For test purpose or for continuous integration, you could force the factory to clean the previous indices when starting the client. It will remove all your datas for every index which has been defined. Just set forceMapping property to true.

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" forceMapping="true" />

Force rebuild templates (use with caution)

For test purpose or for continuous integration, you could force the factory to clean the previous template when starting the client. Just set forceTemplate property to true.

<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" forceTemplate="true" />

Asyncronous initialization

Node and client beans initialization are by default synchronously. They can be initialized asynchronously with the attributes async and taskExecutor.

<task:executor pool-size="4" id="taskExecutor"/>
<elasticsearch:client id="esClient" async="true" taskExecutor="taskExecutor"/>

Aynchronous initialization does not block Spring startup but it continues on background on another thread. Any methods call to these beans before elasticsearch is initialized will be blocker. taskExecutor references a standard Spring's task executor.

Old fashion bean definition

Note that you can use the old fashion method to define your beans instead of using <elasticsearch:...> namespace:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans"
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
    xmlns:util="http://www.springframework.org/schema/util"
    xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans http://www.springframework.org/schema/beans/spring-beans-3.0.xsd
        http://www.springframework.org/schema/util http://www.springframework.org/schema/util/spring-util-3.0.xsd">

    <util:map id="esproperties">
        <entry key="cluster.name" value="newclustername"/>
    </util:map>

    <bean id="esNode"
        class="fr.pilato.spring.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchNodeFactoryBean">
    </bean>

    <bean id="esClient" class="fr.pilato.spring.elasticsearch.ElasticsearchClientFactoryBean" >
        <!-- If ElasticsearchTransportClientFactoryBean -->
        <!--
        <property name="esNodes">
            <list>
                <value>localhost:9300</value>
                <value>localhost:9301</value>
            </list>
        </property>
        -->

        <!--
            When using ElasticsearchClientFactoryBean running node is
            automatically injected. But you can define it as well.
        -->
        <property name="node" ref="esNode" />

        <property name="properties" ref="esproperties" />

        <property name="autoscan" value="false" />
        <property name="mappings">
            <list>
                <value>twitter/tweet</value>
            </list>
        </property>
        <property name="classpathRoot" value="myownfolder" />
        <property name="forceMapping" value="true" />
        <property name="mergeSettings" value="true" />
        <property name="templates">
            <list>
                <value>twitter_template</value>
            </list>
        </property>
        <property name="forceTemplate" value="true" />
        <property name="aliases">
            <list>
                <value>twitter:twitter2012</value>
                <value>twitter:twitter2013</value>
                <value>twitter:twitter2014</value>
            </list>
        </property>
    </bean>

</beans>

Thanks

Special thanks to

License

This software is licensed under the Apache 2 license, quoted below.

Copyright 2011-2015 David Pilato

Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License"); you may not
use this file except in compliance with the License. You may obtain a copy of
the License at

    http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0

Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS, WITHOUT
WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied. See the
License for the specific language governing permissions and limitations under
the License.
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