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README.md

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Overview

Let's face it, forms are really verbose in React. To make matters worse, most form helpers do wayyyy too much magic and often have a significant performance cost associated with them. Formik is a small library that helps you with the 3 most annoying parts:

  1. Getting values in and out of form state
  2. Validation and error messages
  3. Handling form submission

By colocating all of the above in one place, Formik will keep things organized--making testing, refactoring, and reasoning about your forms a breeze.

Developer Experience

I (@jaredpalmer) wrote Formik while building a large internal administrative dashboard with @eonwhite. With around ~30 unique forms, it quickly became obvious that we could benefit by standardizing not just our input components but also the way in which data flowed through our forms.

Why not Redux-Form?

By now, you might be thinking, "Why didn't you just use Redux-Form?" Good question.

  1. According to our prophet Dan Abramov, form state is inherently ephemeral and local, so tracking it in Redux (or any kind of Flux library) is unnecessary
  2. Redux-Form calls your entire top-level Redux reducer multiple times ON EVERY SINGLE KEYSTROKE. This is fine for small apps, but as your Redux app grows, input latency will continue to increase if you use Redux-Form.
  3. Redux-Form is 22.5 kB minified gzipped (Formik is 7.8 kB)

My goal with Formik was to create a scalable, performant, form helper with a minimal API that does the really really annoying stuff, and leaves the rest up to you.

Testimonials

"I can't believe people ever put forms in redux, or did anything else other than this."
--James Long, Creator of Prettier and Actual Budget

"Formik. All day. All long."
--Ken Wheeler, Director of Open Source at Formidable Labs

"Been using @jaredpalmer's Formik lately at work – this is my all-time favorite way to handle forms"
--Brent Jackson, Creator of Rebass, styled-system, Compositor and many more

"Formik removes most of the moving parts involved in forms allowing me to move faster with more confidence."
--Kye Hohenberger, Creator of Emotion

Influences

Formik started by expanding on this little higher order component by Brent Jackson, some naming conventions from Redux-Form, and (most recently) the render props approach popularized by React-Motion and React-Router 4. Whether you have used any of the above or not, Formik only takes a few minutes to get started with.

Installation

Add Formik to your project.

npm i formik --save

You can also try before you buy with this demo of Formik on CodeSandbox.io or on Expo Snack

Demos

Talks

Community Articles / Tutorials

The gist

Formik keeps track of your form's state and then exposes it plus a few reusable methods and event handlers (handleChange, handleBlur, and handleSubmit) to your form via props. handleChange and handleBlur work exactly as expected--they use a name or id attribute to figure out which field to update.

There are two ways to use Formik:

  • withFormik(): A Higher-order Component (HoC) that accepts a configuration object
  • <Formik />: A React component with a render prop

Both do exactly the same thing and share the same internal implementation. They just differ in their respective style....

// Higher Order Component
import React from 'react';
import { withFormik } from 'formik';

// Our inner form component which receives our form's state and updater methods as props
const InnerForm = ({
  values,
  errors,
  touched,
  handleChange,
  handleBlur,
  handleSubmit,
  isSubmitting,
}) => (
  <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
    <input
      type="email"
      name="email"
      onChange={handleChange}
      onBlur={handleBlur}
      value={values.email}
    />
    {touched.email && errors.email && <div>{errors.email}</div>}
    <input
      type="password"
      name="password"
      onChange={handleChange}
      onBlur={handleBlur}
      value={values.password}
    />
    {touched.password && errors.password && <div>{errors.password}</div>}
    <button type="submit" disabled={isSubmitting}>
      Submit
    </button>
  </form>
);

// Wrap our form with the using withFormik HoC
const MyForm = withFormik({
  // Transform outer props into form values
  mapPropsToValues: props => ({ email: '', password: '' }),
  // Add a custom validation function (this can be async too!)
  validate: (values, props) => {
    const errors = {};
    if (!values.email) {
      errors.email = 'Required';
    } else if (
      !/^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(values.email)
    ) {
      errors.email = 'Invalid email address';
    }
    return errors;
  },
  // Submission handler
  handleSubmit: (
    values,
    {
      props,
      setSubmitting,
      setErrors /* setValues, setStatus, and other goodies */,
    }
  ) => {
    LoginToMyApp(values).then(
      user => {
        setSubmitting(false);
        // do whatevs...
        // props.updateUser(user)
      },
      errors => {
        setSubmitting(false);
        // Maybe even transform your API's errors into the same shape as Formik's!
        setErrors(transformMyApiErrors(errors));
      }
    );
  },
})(InnerForm);

// Use <MyForm /> anywhere
const Basic = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My Form</h1>
    <p>This can be anywhere in your application</p>
    <MyForm />
  </div>
);

export default Basic;
// Render Prop
import React from 'react';
import { Formik } from 'formik';

const Basic = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My Form</h1>
    <p>This can be anywhere in your application</p>
    {/*
          The benefit of the render prop approach is that you have full access to React's
          state, props, and composition model. Thus there is no need to map outer props
          to values...you can just set the initial values, and if they depend on props / state
          then--boom--you can directly access to props / state.
          The render prop accepts your inner form component, which you can define separately or inline
          totally up to you:
          - `<Formik render={props => <form>...</form>}>`
          - `<Formik component={InnerForm}>`
          - `<Formik>{props => <form>...</form>}</Formik>` (identical to as render, just written differently)
        */}
    <Formik
      initialValues={{
        email: '',
        password: '',
      }}
      validate={values => {
        // same as above, but feel free to move this into a class method now.
        let errors = {};
        if (!values.email) {
          errors.email = 'Required';
        } else if (
          !/^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(values.email)
        ) {
          errors.email = 'Invalid email address';
        }
        return errors;
      }}
      onSubmit={(
        values,
        { setSubmitting, setErrors /* setValues and other goodies */ }
      ) => {
        LoginToMyApp(values).then(
          user => {
            setSubmitting(false);
            // do whatevs...
            // props.updateUser(user)
          },
          errors => {
            setSubmitting(false);
            // Maybe transform your API's errors into the same shape as Formik's
            setErrors(transformMyApiErrors(errors));
          }
        );
      }}
      render={({
        values,
        errors,
        touched,
        handleChange,
        handleBlur,
        handleSubmit,
        isSubmitting,
      }) => (
        <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
          <input
            type="email"
            name="email"
            onChange={handleChange}
            onBlur={handleBlur}
            value={values.email}
          />
          {touched.email && errors.email && <div>{errors.email}</div>}
          <input
            type="password"
            name="password"
            onChange={handleChange}
            onBlur={handleBlur}
            value={values.password}
          />
          {touched.password && errors.password && <div>{errors.password}</div>}
          <button type="submit" disabled={isSubmitting}>
            Submit
          </button>
        </form>
      )}
    />
  </div>
);

export default Basic;

Complementary Packages

As you can see above, validation is left up to you. Feel free to write your own validators or use a 3rd party library. Personally, I use Yup for object schema validation. It has an API that's pretty similar Joi / React PropTypes but is small enough for the browser and fast enough for runtime usage. Because I ❀️ Yup sooo much, Formik has a special config option / prop for Yup called validationSchema which will automatically transform Yup's validation errors into a pretty object whose keys match values and touched. Anyways, you can install Yup from npm...

npm install yup --save

Table of Contents

Guides

Basics

Imagine you want to build a form that lets you edit user data. However, your user API has nested objects like so.

{
   id: string,
   email: string,
   social: {
     facebook: string,
     twitter: string,
     // ...
   }
}

When we are done we want our dialog to accept just a user, updateUser, and onClose props.

// User.js
import React from 'react';
import Dialog from 'MySuperDialog';
import { Formik } from 'formik';

const EditUserDialog = ({ user, updateUser, onClose }) => {
  return (
    <Dialog onClose={onClose}>
      <h1>Edit User</h1>
      <Formik
        initialValues={user /** { email, social } */}
        onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
          CallMyApi(user.id, values).then(
            updatedUser => {
              actions.setSubmitting(false);
              updateUser(updatedUser), onClose();
            },
            error => {
              actions.setSubmitting(false);
              actions.setErrors(transformMyAPIErrorToAnObject(error));
            }
          );
        }}
        render={({
          values,
          errors,
          touched,
          handleBlur,
          handleChange,
          handleSubmit,
          isSubmitting,
        }) => (
          <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
            <input
              type="email"
              name="email"
              onChange={handleChange}
              onBlur={handleBlur}
              value={values.email}
            />
            {errors.email && touched.email && <div>{errors.email}</div>}
            <input
              type="text"
              name="social.facebook"
              onChange={handleChange}
              onBlur={handleBlur}
              value={values.social.facebook}
            />
            {errors.social &&
              errors.social.facebook &&
              touched.facebook && <div>{errors.social.facebook}</div>}
            <input
              type="text"
              name="social.twitter"
              onChange={handleChange}
              onBlur={handleBlur}
              value={values.social.twitter}
            />
            {errors.social &&
              errors.social.twitter &&
              touched.twitter && <div>{errors.social.twitter}</div>}
            <button type="submit" disabled={isSubmitting}>
              Submit
            </button>
          </form>
        )}
      />
    </Dialog>
  );
};

To make writing forms less verbose. Formik comes with a few helpers to save you key strokes.

  • <Field>
  • <Form />

This is the exact same form as before, but written with <Form /> and <Field />:

// EditUserDialog.js
import React from 'react';
import Dialog from 'MySuperDialog';
import { Formik, Field, Form } from 'formik';

const EditUserDialog = ({ user, updateUser, onClose }) => {
  return (
    <Dialog onClose={onClose}>
      <h1>Edit User</h1>
      <Formik
        initialValues={user /** { email, social } */}
        onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
          CallMyApi(user.id, values).then(
            updatedUser => {
              actions.setSubmitting(false);
              updateUser(updatedUser), onClose();
            },
            error => {
              actions.setSubmitting(false);
              actions.setErrors(transformMyAPIErrorToAnObject(error));
            }
          );
        }}
        render={({ errors, touched, isSubmitting }) => (
          <Form>
            <Field type="email" name="email" />
            {errors.email && touched.social.email && <div>{errors.email}</div>}
            <Field type="text" name="social.facebook" />
            {errors.social.facebook &&
              touched.social.facebook && <div>{errors.social.facebook}</div>}
            <Field type="text" name="social.twitter" />
            {errors.social.twitter &&
              touched.social.twitter && <div>{errors.social.twitter}</div>}
            <button type="submit" disabled={isSubmitting}>
              Submit
            </button>
          </Form>
        )}
      />
    </Dialog>
  );
};

React Native

Formik is 100% compatible with React Native and React Native Web. However, because of differences between ReactDOM's and React Native's handling of forms and text input, there are two differences to be aware of. This section will walk you through them and what I consider to be best practices.

Before going any further, here's a super minimal gist of how to use Formik with React Native that demonstrates the key differences:

// Formik x React Native example
import React from 'react';
import { Button, TextInput, View } from 'react-native';
import { withFormik } from 'formik';

const enhancer = withFormik({
  /*...*/
});

const MyReactNativeForm = props => (
  <View>
    <TextInput
      onChangeText={text => props.setFieldValue('email', text)}
      value={props.values.email}
    />
    <Button onPress={props.handleSubmit} title="Submit" />
  </View>
);

export default enhancer(MyReactNativeForm);

As you can see above, the notable differences between using Formik with React DOM and React Native are:

  1. Formik's props.handleSubmit is passed to a <Button onPress={...} /> instead of HTML <form onSubmit={...} /> component (since there is no <form /> element in React Native).
  2. <TextInput /> uses Formik's props.setFieldValue instead of props.handleChange. To understand why, see the discussion below.

Why use setFieldValue instead of handleChange?

'cuz handleChange will not work in React Native...

import { Button, TextInput, View } from 'react-native';
import { Formik } from 'formik';

const MyReactNativeForm = props => (
  <View>
    <Formik
      onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
          console.log(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
          actions.setSubmitting(false);
        }, 1000);
      }}
      render={formikProps => (
        <View>
          <TextInput
            name="email"
            onChangeText={formikProps.handleChange} // this WILL NOT WORK IN RN
            value={formikProps.values.email}
          />
          <Button onPress={formikProps.handleSubmit} />
        </View>
      )}
    />
  </View>
);

The reason is that Formik's handleChange function expects its first argument to be synthetic DOM event where the event.target is the DOM input element and event.target.id or event.target.name matches the field to be updated. Without this, handleChange will do nothing.

In React Native, neither <TextInput />'s onChange nor onChangeText callbacks pass such an event or one like it to its callback. Instead, they do the following (emphasis added):

onChange?: function
Callback that is called when the text input's text changes.

onChangeText?: function
Callback that is called when the text input's text changes. Changed text is passed as an argument to the callback handler.

However, Formik works just fine if you use props.setFieldValue! Philosophically, just treat React Native's <TextInput /> the same way you would any other 3rd party custom input element.

In conclusion, the following WILL work in React Native:

// ...
// this works.
export const MyReactNativeForm = props => (
  <View>
    <TextInput
      onChangeText={text => props.setFieldValue('email', text)}
      value={props.values.email}
    />
    <Button onPress={props.handleSubmit} />
  </View>
);
// ...

Avoiding new functions in render

If for any reason you wish to avoid creating new functions on each render, I suggest treating React Native's <TextInput /> as if it were another 3rd party custom input element:

  • Write your own class wrapper around the custom input element
  • Pass the custom component props.setFieldValue instead of props.handleChange
  • Use a custom change handler callback that calls whatever you passed-in setFieldValue as (in this case we'll match the React Native TextInput API and call it this.props.onChangeText for parity).
// FormikReactNativeTextInput.js
import * as React from 'react';
import { TextInput } from 'react-native';

export default class FormikReactNativeTextInput extends React.Component {
  handleChange = (value: string) => {
    // remember that onChangeText will be Formik's setFieldValue
    this.props.onChangeText(this.props.name, value);
  };

  render() {
    // we want to pass through all the props except for onChangeText
    const { onChangeText, ...otherProps } = this.props;
    return (
      <TextInput
        onChangeText={this.handleChange}
        {...otherProps} // IRL, you should be more explicit when using TS
      />
    );
  }
}

Then you could just use this custom input as follows:

// MyReactNativeForm.js
import { View, Button } from 'react-native';
import TextInput from './FormikReactNativeTextInput';
import { Formik } from 'formik';

const MyReactNativeForm = props => (
  <View>
    <Formik
      onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
          console.log(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
          actions.setSubmitting(false);
        }, 1000);
      }}
      render={props => (
        <View>
          <TextInput
            name="email"
            onChangeText={props.setFieldValue}
            value={props.values.email}
          />
          <Button title="submit" onPress={props.handleSubmit} />
        </View>
      )}
    />
  </View>
);

export default MyReactNativeForm;

Using Formik with TypeScript

TypeScript Types

The Formik source code is written in TypeScript, so you can rest assured that types will always be up to date. As a mental model, Formik's types are very similar to React Router 4's <Route>.

Render props (<Formik /> and <Field />)

import * as React from 'react';
import { Formik, FormikProps, Form, Field, FieldProps } from 'formik';

interface MyFormValues {
  firstName: string;
}

export const MyApp: React.SFC<{} /* whatever */> = () => {
  return (
    <div>
      <h1>My Example</h1>
      <Formik
        initialValues={{ firstName: '' }}
        onSubmit={(values: MyFormValues) => alert(JSON.stringify(values))}
        render={(formikBag: FormikProps<MyFormValues>) => (
          <Form>
            <Field
              name="firstName"
              render={({ field, form }: FieldProps<MyFormValues>) => (
                <div>
                  <input type="text" {...field} placeholder="First Name" />
                  {form.touched.firstName &&
                    form.errors.firstName &&
                    form.errors.firstName}
                </div>
              )}
            />
          </Form>
        )}
      />
    </div>
  );
};

withFormik()

import React from 'react';
import * as Yup from 'yup';
import { withFormik, FormikProps, FormikErrors, Form, Field } from 'formik';

// Shape of form values
interface FormValues {
  email: string;
  password: string;
}

interface OtherProps {
  message: string;
}

// You may see / user InjectedFormikProps<OtherProps, FormValues> instead of what comes below. They are the same--InjectedFormikProps was artifact of when Formik only exported an HOC. It is also less flexible as it MUST wrap all props (it passes them through).
const InnerForm = (props: OtherProps & FormikProps<FormValues>) => {
  const { touched, errors, isSubmitting, message } = props;
  return (
    <Form>
      <h1>{message}</h1>
      <Field type="email" name="email" />
      {touched.email && errors.email && <div>{errors.email}</div>}

      <Field type="password" name="password" />
      {touched.password && errors.password && <div>{errors.password}</div>}

      <button type="submit" disabled={isSubmitting}>
        Submit
      </button>
    </Form>
  );
};

// The type of props MyForm receives
interface MyFormProps {
  initialEmail?: string;
  message: string; // if this passed all the way through you might do this or make a union type
}

// Wrap our form with the using withFormik HoC
const MyForm = withFormik<MyFormProps, FormValues>({
  // Transform outer props into form values
  mapPropsToValues: props => {
    return {
      email: props.initialEmail || '',
      password: '',
    };
  },

  // Add a custom validation function (this can be async too!)
  validate: (values: FormValues) => {
    let errors: FormikErrors = {};
    if (!values.email) {
      errors.email = 'Required';
    } else if (!isValidEmail(values.email)) {
      errors.email = 'Invalid email address';
    }
    return errors;
  },

  handleSubmit: values => {
    // do submitting things
  },
})(InnerForm);

// Use <MyForm /> anywhere
const Basic = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My App</h1>
    <p>This can be anywhere in your application</p>
    <MyForm message="Sign up" />
  </div>
);

export default Basic;

How Form Submission Works

To submit a form in Formik, you need to somehow fire off the provided handleSubmit(e) or submitForm prop. When you call either of these methods, Formik will execute the following (pseudo code) each time:

  • "Pre-submit"
    • Touch all fields
    • Set isSubmitting to true
    • Increment submitCount + 1
  • "Validation"
    • Set isValidating to true
    • Run all field-level validations, validate, and validationSchema asynchronously and deeply merge results
    • Are there any errors?
      • Yes: Abort submission. Set isValidating to false, set errors, set isSubmitting to false
      • No: Set isValidating to false, proceed to "Submission"
  • "Submission"
    • Proceed with running your submission handler (i.e.onSubmit or handleSubmit)
    • you call setSubmitting(false) in your handler to finish the cycle

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I determine if my submission handler is executing?

If isValidating is false and isSubmitting is true.

Why does Formik touch all fields before submit?

It is common practice to only show an input's errors in the UI if it has been visited (a.k.a "touched"). Before submitting a form, Formik touches all fields so that all errors that may have been hidden will now be visible.

How do I protect against double submits?

Disable whatever is triggering submission if isSubmitting is true.

How do I know when my form is validating before submit?

If isValidating is true and isSubmitting is true.

API

<Formik />

<Formik> is a component that helps you with building forms. It uses a render props pattern made popular by libraries like React Motion and React Router.

import React from 'react';
import { Formik } from 'formik';

const BasicExample = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My Form</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ name: 'jared' }}
      onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
          alert(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
          actions.setSubmitting(false);
        }, 1000);
      }}
      render={props => (
        <form onSubmit={props.handleSubmit}>
          <input
            type="text"
            onChange={props.handleChange}
            onBlur={props.handleBlur}
            value={props.values.name}
            name="name"
          />
          {props.errors.name && <div id="feedback">{props.errors.name}</div>}
          <button type="submit">Submit</button>
        </form>
      )}
    />
  </div>
);

Formik render methods

There are three ways to render things with <Formik />

  • <Formik component>
  • <Formik render>
  • <Formik children>

Formik props

All three render methods will be passed the same props:

dirty: boolean

Returns true if values are not deeply equal from initial values, false otherwise. dirty is a readonly computed property and should not be mutated directly.

errors: { [field: string]: string }

Form validation errors. Should match the shape of your form's values defined in initialValues. If you are using validationSchema (which you should be), keys and shape will match your schema exactly. Internally, Formik transforms raw Yup validation errors on your behalf. If you are using validate, then that function will determine the errors objects shape.

handleBlur: (e: any) => void

onBlur event handler. Useful for when you need to track whether an input has been touched or not. This should be passed to <input onBlur={handleBlur} ... />

DOM-only. Use setFieldTouched in React Native.

handleChange: (e: React.ChangeEvent<any>) => void

General input change event handler. This will update the values[key] where key is the event-emitting input's name attribute. If the name attribute is not present, handleChange will look for an input's id attribute. Note: "input" here means all HTML inputs.

DOM-only. Use setFieldValue in React Native.

handleReset: () => void

Reset handler. Will reset the form to its initial state. This should be passed to <button onClick={handleReset}>...</button>

handleSubmit: (e: React.FormEvent<HTMLFormEvent>) => void

Submit handler. This should be passed to <form onSubmit={props.handleSubmit}>...</form>. To learn more about the submission process, see How Form Submission Works.

isSubmitting: boolean

Submitting state of the form. Returns true if submission is in progress and false otherwise. IMPORTANT: Formik will set this to true as soon as submission is attempted. To learn more about the submission process, see How Form Submission Works.

isValid: boolean

Returns true if the there are no errors, or the result of isInitialValid the form if is in "pristine" condition (i.e. not dirty)).

isValidating: boolean

Returns true if Formik is running any validation function, false otherwise. To learn more about what happens with isValidating during the submission process, see How Form Submission Works.

resetForm: (nextValues?: Values) => void

Imperatively reset the form. This will clear errors and touched, set isSubmitting to false, isValidating to false, and rerun mapPropsToValues with the current WrappedComponent's props or what's passed as an argument. The latter is useful for calling resetForm within componentWillReceiveProps.

setErrors: (fields: { [field: string]: string }) => void

Set errors imperatively.

setFieldError: (field: string, errorMsg: string) => void

Set the error message of a field imperatively. field should match the key of errors you wish to update. Useful for creating custom input error handlers.

setFieldTouched: (field: string, isTouched: boolean, shouldValidate?: boolean) => void

Set the touched state of a field imperatively. field should match the key of touched you wish to update. Useful for creating custom input blur handlers. Calling this method will trigger validation to run if validateOnBlur is set to true (which it is by default). You can also explicitly prevent/skip validation by passing a third argument as false.

submitForm: () => void

Trigger a form submission.

submitCount: number

Number of times user tried to submit the form. Increases when handleSubmit is called, resets after calling handleReset. submitCount is readonly computed property and should not be mutated directly.

setFieldValue: (field: string, value: any, shouldValidate?: boolean) => void

Set the value of a field imperatively. field should match the key of values you wish to update. Useful for creating custom input change handlers. Calling this will trigger validation to run if validateOnChange is set to true (which it is by default). You can also explicitly prevent/skip validation by passing a third argument as false.

setStatus: (status?: any) => void

Set a top-level status to anything you want imperatively. Useful for controlling arbitrary top-level state related to your form. For example, you can use it to pass API responses back into your component in handleSubmit.

setSubmitting: (isSubmitting: boolean) => void

Set isSubmitting imperatively.

setTouched: (fields: { [field: string]: boolean }) => void

Set touched imperatively.

setValues: (fields: { [field: string]: any }) => void

Set values imperatively.

status?: any

A top-level status object that you can use to represent form state that can't otherwise be expressed/stored with other methods. This is useful for capturing and passing through API responses to your inner component.

status should only be modifed by calling setStatus: (status?: any) => void

touched: { [field: string]: boolean }

Touched fields. Each key corresponds to a field that has been touched/visited.

values: { [field: string]: any }

Your form's values. Will have the shape of the result of mapPropsToValues (if specified) or all props that are not functions passed to your wrapped component.

validateForm: (values?: any) => void

Imperatively call your validate or [validateSchema] depending on what was specified. You can optionally pass values to validate against and this modify Formik state accordingly, otherwise this will use the current values of the form.

validateField: (field: string) => void

Imperatively call field's validate function if specified for given field. Formik will use the current field value.

component

<Formik component={ContactForm} />;

const ContactForm = ({
  handleSubmit,
  handleChange,
  handleBlur,
  values,
  errors,
}) => (
  <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
    <input
      type="text"
      onChange={handleChange}
      onBlur={handleBlur}
      value={values.name}
      name="name"
    />
    {errors.name && <div>{errors.name}</div>}
    <button type="submit">Submit</button>
  </form>
};

Warning: <Formik component> takes precendence over <Formik render> so don’t use both in the same <Formik>.

render: (props: FormikProps<Values>) => ReactNode

<Formik render={props => <ContactForm {...props} />} />

<Formik
  render={({ handleSubmit, handleChange, handleBlur, values, errors }) => (
    <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
      <input
        type="text"
        onChange={handleChange}
        onBlur={handleBlur}
        value={values.name}
        name="name"
      />
      {errors.name &&
        <div>
          {errors.name}
        </div>}
      <button type="submit">Submit</button>
    </form>
  )}
/>

children: func

<Formik children={props => <ContactForm {...props} />} />

// or...

<Formik>
  {({ handleSubmit, handleChange, handleBlur, values, errors }) => (
    <form onSubmit={handleSubmit}>
      <input
        type="text"
        onChange={handleChange}
        onBlur={handleBlur}
        value={values.name}
        name="name"
      />
      {errors.name &&
        <div>
          {errors.name}
        </div>}
      <button type="submit">Submit</button>
    </form>
  )}
</Formik>

enableReinitialize?: boolean

Default is false. Control whether Formik should reset the form if [initialValues] changes (using deep equality).

isInitialValid?: boolean

Default is false. Control the initial value of isValid prop prior to mount. You can also pass a function. Useful for situations when you want to enable/disable a submit and reset buttons on initial mount.

initialValues?: Values

Initial field values of the form, Formik will make these values available to render methods component as props.values.

Even if your form is empty by default, you must initialize all fields with initial values otherwise React will throw an error saying that you have changed an input from uncontrolled to controlled.

Note: initialValues not available to the higher-order component, use mapPropsToValues instead.

onReset?: (values: Values, formikBag: FormikBag) => void

Your optional form reset handler. It is passed your forms values and the "FormikBag".

onSubmit: (values: Values, formikBag: FormikBag) => void

Your form submission handler. It is passed your forms values and the "FormikBag", which includes an object containing a subset of the injected props and methods (i.e. all the methods with names that start with set<Thing> + resetForm) and any props that were passed to the the wrapped component.

Note: errors, touched, status and all event handlers are NOT included in the FormikBag.

validate?: (values: Values) => FormikErrors<Values> | Promise<any>

Note: I suggest using validationSchema and Yup for validation. However, validate is a dependency-free, straightforward way to validate your forms.

Validate the form's values with function. This function can either be:

  1. Synchronous and return an errors object.
// Synchronous validation
const validate = (values, props) => {
  let errors = {};

  if (!values.email) {
    errors.email = 'Required';
  } else if (!/^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(values.email)) {
    errors.email = 'Invalid email address';
  }

  //...

  return errors;
};
  • Asynchronous and return a Promise that's error in an errors object
// Async Validation
const sleep = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));

const validate = (values, props) => {
  return sleep(2000).then(() => {
    let errors = {};
    if (['admin', 'null', 'god'].includes(values.username)) {
      errors.username = 'Nice try';
    }
    // ...
    if (Object.keys(errors).length) {
      throw errors;
    }
  });
};

validateOnBlur?: boolean

Default is true. Use this option to run validations on blur events. More specifically, when either handleBlur, setFieldTouched, or setTouched are called.

validateOnChange?: boolean

Default is true. Use this option to tell Formik to run validations on change events and change-related methods. More specifically, when either handleChange, setFieldValue, or setValues are called.

validationSchema?: Schema | (() => Schema)

A Yup schema or a function that returns a Yup schema. This is used for validation. Errors are mapped by key to the inner component's errors. Its keys should match those of values.

<Field />

<Field /> will automagically hook up inputs to Formik. It uses the name attribute to match up with Formik state. <Field /> will default to an <input /> element. To change the underlying element of <Field />, specify a component prop. It can either be a string like select or another React component. <Field /> can also take a render prop.

import React from 'react';
import { Formik, Field } from 'formik';

const Example = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My Form</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ email: '', color: 'red', firstName: '' }}
      onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
          alert(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
          actions.setSubmitting(false);
        }, 1000);
      }}
      render={(props: FormikProps<Values>) => (
        <form onSubmit={props.handleSubmit}>
          <Field type="email" name="email" placeholder="Email" />
          <Field component="select" name="color">
            <option value="red">Red</option>
            <option value="green">Green</option>
            <option value="blue">Blue</option>
          </Field>
          <Field name="firstName" component={CustomInputComponent} />
          <Field
            name="lastName"
            render={({ field /* _form */ }) => (
              <input {...field} placeholder="firstName" />
            )}
          />
          <button type="submit">Submit</button>
        </form>
      )}
    />
  </div>
);

const CustomInputComponent: React.SFC<
  FieldProps<Values> & CustomInputProps
> = ({
  field, // { name, value, onChange, onBlur }
  form: { touched, errors }, // also values, setXXXX, handleXXXX, dirty, isValid, status, etc.
  ...props
}) => (
  <div>
    <input type="text" {...field} {...props} />
    {touched[field.name] &&
      errors[field.name] && <div className="error">{errors[field.name]}</div>}
  </div>
);

validate?: (value: any) => undefined | string | Promise<any>

You can run independent field-level validations by passing a function to the validate prop. The function will respect the validateOnBlur and validateOnChange config/props specified in the <Field>'s parent <Formik> / withFormik. This function can be either be:

  • Synchronous and if invalid, return a string containing the error message or return undefined.
// Synchronous validation for Field
const validate = value => {
  let errorMessage;
  if (!/^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(value)) {
    errorMessage = 'Invalid email address';
  }
  return errorMessage;
};
  • async: Return a Promise that throws a string containing the error message. This works like Formik's validate, but instead of returning an errors object, it's just a string.

  • Asynchronous and return a Promise that's error is an string with the error message

// Async validation for Field
const sleep = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));

const validate = value => {
  return sleep(2000).then(() => {
    if (['admin', 'null', 'god'].includes(value)) {
      throw 'Nice try';
    }
  });
};

Note: To allow for i18n libraries, the TypeScript typings for validate are slightly relaxed and allow you to return a Function (e.g. i18n('invalid')).

Refs

When you are not using a custom component and you need to access the underlying DOM node created by Field (e.g. to call focus), pass the callback to the innerRef prop instead.

<FieldArray />

<FieldArray /> is a component that helps with common array/list manipulations. You pass it a name property with the path to the key within values that holds the relevant array. <FieldArray /> will then give you access to array helper methods via render props. For convenience, calling these methods will trigger validation and also manage touched for you.

import React from 'react';
import { Formik, Form, Field, FieldArray } from 'formik';

// Here is an example of a form with an editable list.
// Next to each input are buttons for insert and remove.
// If the list is empty, there is a button to add an item.
export const FriendList = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>Friend List</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ friends: ['jared', 'ian', 'brent'] }}
      onSubmit={values =>
        setTimeout(() => {
          alert(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
        }, 500)
      }
      render={({ values }) => (
        <Form>
          <FieldArray
            name="friends"
            render={arrayHelpers => (
              <div>
                {values.friends && values.friends.length > 0 ? (
                  values.friends.map((friend, index) => (
                    <div key={index}>
                      <Field name={`friends.${index}`} />
                      <button
                        type="button"
                        onClick={() => arrayHelpers.remove(index)} // remove a friend from the list
                      >
                        -
                      </button>
                      <button
                        type="button"
                        onClick={() => arrayHelpers.insert(index, '')} // insert an empty string at a position
                      >
                        +
                      </button>
                    </div>
                  ))
                ) : (
                  <button type="button" onClick={() => arrayHelpers.push('')}>
                    {/* show this when user has removed all friends from the list */}
                    Add a friend
                  </button>
                )}
                <div>
                  <button type="submit">Submit</button>
                </div>
              </div>
            )}
          />
        </Form>
      )}
    />
  </div>
);
name: string

The name or path to the relevant key in values.

validateOnChange?: boolean

Default is true. Determines if form validation should or should not be run after any array manipulations.

FieldArray Array of Objects

You can also iterate through an array of objects, by following a convention of object[index]property or object.index.property for the name attributes of <Field /> or <input /> elements in <FieldArray />.

<Form>
  <FieldArray
    name="friends"
    render={arrayHelpers => (
      <div>
        {values.friends.map((friend, index) => (
          <div key={index}>
            <Field name={`friends[${index}]name`} />
            <Field name={`friends.${index}.age`} /> // both these conventions do
            the same
            <button type="button" onClick={() => arrayHelpers.remove(index)}>
              -
            </button>
          </div>
        ))}
        <button
          type="button"
          onClick={() => arrayHelpers.push({ name: '', age: '' })}
        >
          +
        </button>
      </div>
    )}
  />
</Form>

FieldArray Validation Gotchas

Validation can be tricky with <FieldArray>.

If you use validationSchema and your form has array validation requirements (like a min length) as well as nested array field requirements, displaying errors can be tricky. Formik/Yup will show validation errors inside out. For example,

const schema = Yup.object().shape({
  friends: Yup.array()
    .of(
      Yup.object().shape({
        name: Yup.string()
          .min(4, 'too short')
          .required('Required'), // these constraints take precedence
        salary: Yup.string()
          .min(3, 'cmon')
          .required('Required'), // these constraints take precedence
      })
    )
    .required('Must have friends') // these constraints are shown if and only if inner constraints are satisfied
    .min(3, 'Minimum of 3 friends'),
});

Since Yup and your custom validation function should always output error messages as strings, you'll need to sniff whether your nested error is an array or a string when you go to display it.

So...to display 'Must have friends' and 'Minimum of 3 friends' (our example's array validation contstraints)...

Bad

// within a `FieldArray`'s render
const FriendArrayErrors = errors =>
  errors.friends ? <div>{errors.friends}</div> : null; // app will crash

Good

// within a `FieldArray`'s render
const FriendArrayErrors = errors =>
  typeof errors.friends === 'string' ? <div>{errors.friends}</div> : null;

For the nested field errors, you should assume that no part of the object is defined unless you've checked for it. Thus, you may want to do yourself a favor and make a custom <ErrorMessage /> component that looks like this:

import { Field, getIn } from 'formik';

const ErrorMessage = ({ name }) => (
  <Field
    name={name}
    render={({ form }) => {
      const error = getIn(form.errors, name);
      const touch = getIn(form.touched, name);
      return touch && error ? error : null;
    }}
  />
);

// Usage
<ErrorMessage name="friends[0].name" />; // => null, 'too short', or 'required'

NOTE: In Formik v0.12 / 1.0, a new meta prop may be be added to Field and FieldArray that will give you relevant metadata such as error & touch, which will save you from having to use Formik or lodash's getIn or checking if the path is defined on your own.

FieldArray Helpers

The following methods are made available via render props.

  • push: (obj: any) => void: Add a value to the end of an array
  • swap: (indexA: number, indexB: number) => void: Swap two values in an array
  • move: (from: number, to: number) => void: Move an element in an array to another index
  • insert: (index: number, value: any) => void: Insert an element at a given index into the array
  • unshift: (value: any) => number: Add an element to the beginning of an array and return its length
  • remove<T>(index: number): T | undefined: Remove an element at an index of an array and return it
  • pop<T>(): T | undefined: Remove and return value from the end of the array

FieldArray render methods

There are three ways to render things with <FieldArray />

  • <FieldArray name="..." component>
  • <FieldArray name="..." render>
render: (arrayHelpers: ArrayHelpers) => React.ReactNode
import React from 'react';
import { Formik, Form, Field, FieldArray } from 'formik'

export const FriendList = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>Friend List</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ friends: ['jared', 'ian', 'brent'] }}
      onSubmit={...}
      render={formikProps => (
        <FieldArray
          name="friends"
          render={({ move, swap, push, insert, unshift, pop }) => (
            <Form>
              {/*... use these however you want */}
            </Form>
          )}
        />
    />
  </div>
);
component: React.ReactNode
import React from 'react';
import { Formik, Form, Field, FieldArray } from 'formik'


export const FriendList = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>Friend List</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ friends: ['jared', 'ian', 'brent'] }}
      onSubmit={...}
      render={formikProps => (
        <FieldArray
          name="friends"
          component={MyDynamicForm}
        />
    />
  </div>
);


// In addition to the array helpers, Formik state and helpers
// (values, touched, setXXX, etc) are provided through a `form`
// prop
export const MyDynamicForm = ({
  move, swap, push, insert, unshift, pop, form
}) => (
 <Form>
  {/**  whatever you need to do */}
 </Form>
);

<Form />

Like <Field />, <Form /> is a helper component you can use to save time. It is tiny wrapper around <form onSubmit={context.formik.handleSubmit} />. This means you don't need to explictly type out <form onSubmit={props.handleSubmit} /> if you don't want to.

ReactDOM only

import React from 'react';
import { Formik, Field, Form } from 'formik';

const Example = () => (
  <div>
    <h1>My Form</h1>
    <Formik
      initialValues={{ email: '', color: 'red' }}
      onSubmit={(values, actions) => {
        setTimeout(() => {
          alert(JSON.stringify(values, null, 2));
          actions.setSubmitting(false);
        }, 1000);
      }}
      component={MyForm}
    />
  </div>
);

const MyForm = () => (
  <Form>
    <Field type="email" name="email" placeholder="Email" />
    <Field component="select" name="color">
      <option value="red">Red</option>
      <option value="green">Green</option>
      <option value="blue">Blue</option>
    </Field>
    <button type="submit">Submit</button>
  </Form>
);

withFormik(options)

Create a higher-order React component class that passes props and form handlers (the "FormikBag") into your component derived from supplied options.

options

displayName?: string

When your inner form component is a stateless functional component, you can use the displayName option to give the component a proper name so you can more easily find it in React DevTools. If specified, your wrapped form will show up as Formik(displayName). If omitted, it will show up as Formik(Component). This option is not required for class components (e.g. class XXXXX extends React.Component {..}).

enableReinitialize?: boolean

Default is false. Control whether Formik should reset the form if the wrapped component props change (using deep equality).

handleSubmit: (values: Values, formikBag: FormikBag) => void

Your form submission handler. It is passed your forms values and the "FormikBag", which includes an object containing a subset of the injected props and methods (i.e. all the methods with names that start with set<Thing> + resetForm) and any props that were passed to the the wrapped component.

The "FormikBag":

Note: errors, touched, status and all event handlers are NOT included in the FormikBag.

isInitialValid?: boolean | (props: Props) => boolean

Default is false. Control the initial value of isValid prop prior to mount. You can also pass a function. Useful for situations when you want to enable/disable a submit and reset buttons on initial mount.

mapPropsToValues?: (props: Props) => Values

If this option is specified, then Formik will transfer its results into updatable form state and make these values available to the new component as props.values. If mapPropsToValues is not specified, then Formik will map all props that are not functions to the inner component's props.values. That is, if you omit it, Formik will only pass props where typeof props[k] !== 'function', where k is some key.

Even if your form is not receiving any props from its parent, use mapPropsToValues to initialize your forms empty state.

validate?: (values: Values, props: Props) => FormikErrors<Values> | Promise<any>

Note: I suggest using validationSchema and Yup for validation. However, validate is a dependency-free, straightforward way to validate your forms.

Validate the form's values with function. This function can either be:

  1. Synchronous and return an errors object.
// Synchronous validation
const validate = (values, props) => {
  let errors = {};

  if (!values.email) {
    errors.email = 'Required';
  } else if (!/^[A-Z0-9._%+-]+@[A-Z0-9.-]+\.[A-Z]{2,4}$/i.test(values.email)) {
    errors.email = 'Invalid email address';
  }

  //...

  return errors;
};
  • Asynchronous and return a Promise that's error is an errors object
// Async Validation
const sleep = ms => new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, ms));

const validate = (values, props) => {
  return sleep(2000).then(() => {
    let errors = {};
    if (['admin', 'null', 'god'].includes(values.username)) {
      errors.username = 'Nice try';
    }
    // ...
    if (Object.keys(errors).length) {
      throw errors;
    }
  });
};
validateOnBlur?: boolean

Default is true. Use this option to run validations on blur events. More specifically, when either handleBlur, setFieldTouched, or setTouched are called.

validateOnChange?: boolean

Default is true. Use this option to tell Formik to run validations on change events and change-related methods. More specifically, when either handleChange, setFieldValue, or setValues are called.

validationSchema?: Schema | ((props: Props) => Schema)

A Yup schema or a function that returns a Yup schema. This is used for validation. Errors are mapped by key to the inner component's errors. Its keys should match those of values.

Injected props and methods

These are identical to the props of <Formik render={props => ...} />

connect()

connect() is a higher-order component that injects raw Formik context as prop called formik into the inner component. Fun fact: Formik uses connect() under the hood to wire up <Field/>, <FastField>, and <Form>. Advanced users may find it useful to use connect() when building custom components.

import { connnect } from 'formik';

const SubmitCount = ({ formik }) => <div>{formik.submitCount}</div>;

export default connect(SubmitCount);

Organizations and projects using Formik

List of organizations and projects using Formik

Authors

Contributors

Formik is made with <3 thanks to these wonderful people (emoji key):


Jared Palmer

πŸ’¬ πŸ’» 🎨 πŸ“– πŸ’‘ πŸ€” πŸ‘€ ⚠️

Ian White

πŸ’¬ πŸ› πŸ’» πŸ“– πŸ€” πŸ‘€

Andrej Badin

πŸ’¬ πŸ› πŸ“–

Adam Howard

πŸ’¬ πŸ› πŸ€” πŸ‘€

Vlad Shcherbin

πŸ’¬ πŸ› πŸ€”

Brikou CARRE

πŸ› πŸ“–

Sam Kvale

πŸ› πŸ’» ⚠️

Jon Tansey

πŸ› πŸ’»

Tyler Martinez

πŸ› πŸ“–

This project follows the all-contributors specification. Contributions of any kind welcome!


MIT License.