Example project showing how to build a Spring Boot App providing a GUI with Vue.js
Switch branches/tags
Nothing to show
Clone or download
jonashackt General update Vue CLI 3.0.3 --> 3.1.0 incl. upgrading @vue/cli 3.0.3…
… plugins to 3.1.0

with that also webpack 4.19.1 --> 4.23.1 & jest 23.4.0 --> 23.6.0
bootstrap-vue 1.5.1 --> 2.0.0-rc.11
Latest commit 57b1ea7 Nov 2, 2018

README.md

spring-boot-vuejs

Build Status Coverage Status License versionspringboot versionnodejs versionvuejs versionvuecli versionwebpack versionaxios versionjest versionnightwatch

If you´re a JavaMagazin / blog.codecentric.de / Softwerker reader, consider switching to vue-cli-v2-webpack-v3

localhost-first-run

A live deployment is available on Heroku: https://spring-boot-vuejs.herokuapp.com

This project is used as example in a variety of articles & as eBook:

java-magazin-8.2018 entwickler-press-092018 softwerker-vol12

blog.codecentric.de/en/2018/04/spring-boot-vuejs | JavaMagazin 8.2018 | entwickler.press shortcuts 229 | softwerker Vol.12

Table of Contents

In Search of a new Web Frontend-Framework after 2 Years of absence...

Well, I’m not a Frontend developer. I’m more like playing around with Spring Boot, Web- & Microservices & Docker, automating things with Ansible and Docker, Scaling things with Spring Cloud, Docker Compose, and Traefik... And the only GUIs I’m building are the "new JS framework in town"-app every two years... :) So the last one was Angular 1 - and it felt, as it was a good choice! I loved the coding experience and after a day of training, I felt able to write awesome Frontends...

But now we’re 2 years later and I heard from afar, that there was a complete rewrite of Angular (2), a new kid in town from Facebook (React) and lots of ES201x stuff and dependency managers like bower and Co. So I’m now in the new 2-year-cycle of trying to cope up again - and so glad I found this article: https://medium.com/reverdev/why-we-moved-from-angular-2-to-vue-js-and-why-we-didnt-choose-react-ef807d9f4163

Key points are:

  • Angular 2 isn’t the way to go if you know version 1 (complete re-write, only with Typescript, loss of many of 1’s advantages, Angular 4 is coming)
  • React (facebookish problems (licence), need to choose btw. Redux & MObX, harder learning curve, slower coding speed)

comparison-angular-react-vuejs

And the introduction phrase sounds really great:

Vue (pronounced /vjuː/, like view) is a progressive framework for building user interfaces. Unlike other monolithic frameworks, Vue is designed from the ground up to be incrementally adoptable. The core library is focused on the view layer only and is very easy to pick up and integrate with other libraries or existing projects. On the other hand, Vue is also perfectly capable of powering sophisticated Single-Page Applications when used in combination with modern tooling and supporting libraries.

So I think, it could be a good idea to invest a day or so into Vue.js. Let’s have a look here!

Setup Vue.js & Spring Boot

Prerequisites

MacOSX

brew install node
npm install -g @vue/cli

Linux

sudo apt update
sudo apt install node
npm install -g @vue/cli

Windows

choco install npm
npm install -g @vue/cli

Project setup

spring-boot-vuejs
├─┬ backend     → backend module with Spring Boot code
│ ├── src
│ └── pom.xml
├─┬ frontend    → frontend module with Vue.js code
│ ├── src
│ └── pom.xml
└── pom.xml     → Maven parent pom managing both modules

Backend

Go to https://start.spring.io/ and initialize a Spring Boot app with Web and Actuator. Place the zip’s contents in the backend folder.

Customize pom to copy content from Frontend for serving it later with the embedded Tomcat:

<build>
  <plugins>
    <plugin>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    </plugin>
    <plugin>
      <artifactId>maven-resources-plugin</artifactId>
      <executions>
        <execution>
          <id>copy Vue.js frontend content</id>
          <phase>generate-resources</phase>
          <goals>
            <goal>copy-resources</goal>
          </goals>
          <configuration>
            <outputDirectory>src/main/resources/public</outputDirectory>
            <overwrite>true</overwrite>
            <resources>
              <resource>
                <directory>${project.parent.basedir}/frontend/target/dist</directory>
                <includes>
                  <include>static/</include>
                  <include>index.html</include>
                  <include>favicon.ico</include>
                </includes>
              </resource>
            </resources>
          </configuration>
        </execution>
      </executions>
    </plugin>
  </plugins>
</build>

Frontend

Creating our frontend project is done by the slightly changed (we use --no-git here, because our parent project is already a git repository and otherwise vue CLI 3 would initialize an new one):

vue create frontend --no-git

see https://cli.vuejs.org/guide/

This will initialize a project skeleton for Vue.js in /frontend directory - it, therefore, asks some questions in the cli:

vuejs-cli3-create

Do not choose the default preset with default (babel, eslint), because we need some more plugins for our project here (choose the Plugins with the space bar):

vuejs-cli3-select-plugins

You can now also use the new vue ui command/feature to configure your project:

vue-ui

If you want to learn more about installing Vue.js, head over to the docs: https://vuejs.org/v2/guide/installation.html

Use frontend-maven-plugin to handle NPM, Node, Bower, Grunt, Gulp, Webpack and so on :)

If you’re a backend dev like me, this Maven plugin here https://github.com/eirslett/frontend-maven-plugin is a great help for you - because, if you know Maven, that’s everything you need! Just add this plugin to the frontend’s pom.xml:

<build>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>com.github.eirslett</groupId>
            <artifactId>frontend-maven-plugin</artifactId>
            <version>${frontend-maven-plugin.version}</version>
            <executions>
                <!-- Install our node and npm version to run npm/node scripts-->
                <execution>
                    <id>install node and npm</id>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>install-node-and-npm</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <nodeVersion>v10.10.0</nodeVersion>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
                <!-- Install all project dependencies -->
                <execution>
                    <id>npm install</id>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>npm</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <!-- optional: default phase is "generate-resources" -->
                    <phase>generate-resources</phase>
                    <!-- Optional configuration which provides for running any npm command -->
                    <configuration>
                        <arguments>install</arguments>
                    </configuration>
                </execution>
                <!-- Build and minify static files -->
                <execution>
                    <id>npm run build</id>
                    <goals>
                        <goal>npm</goal>
                    </goals>
                    <configuration>
                        <arguments>run build</arguments>
        </configuration>
                </execution>
            </executions>
        </plugin>
    </plugins>
</build>

Tell Webpack to output the dist/ contents to target/

Commonly, node projects will create a dist/ directory for builds which contains the minified source code of the web app - but we want it all in /target. Therefore we need to create the optional vue.config.js and configure the outputDir and assetsDir correctly:

module.exports = {
  ...
  // Change build paths to make them Maven compatible
  // see https://cli.vuejs.org/config/
  outputDir: 'target/dist',
  assetsDir: 'static'
}

First App run

Inside the root directory, do a:

mvn clean install

Run our complete Spring Boot App:

mvn --projects backend spring-boot:run

Now go to http://localhost:8088/ and have a look at your first Vue.js Spring Boot App.

Faster feedback with webpack-dev-server

The webpack-dev-server, which will update and build every change through all the parts of the JavaScript build-chain, is pre-configured in Vue.js out-of-the-box! So the only thing needed to get fast feedback development-cycle is to cd into frontend and run:

npm run serve

That’s it!

Browser developer tools extension

Install vue-devtools Browser extension https://github.com/vuejs/vue-devtools and get better feedback, e.g. in Chrome:

vue-devtools-chrome

IntelliJ integration

There's a blog post: https://blog.jetbrains.com/webstorm/2018/01/working-with-vue-js-in-webstorm/

Especially the New... Vue Component looks quite cool :)

HTTP calls from Vue.js to (Spring Boot) REST backend

Prior to Vue 2.0, there was a build in solution (vue-resource). But from 2.0 on, 3rd party libraries are necessary. One of them is Axios - also see blog post https://alligator.io/vuejs/rest-api-axios/

npm install axios --save

Calling a REST service with Axios is simple. Go into the script area of your component, e.g. Hello.vue and add:

import axios from 'axios'

data (){
  return {
    response: [],
    errors: []
  }
},

callRestService (){
  axios.get(`api/hello`)
    .then(response => {
      // JSON responses are automatically parsed.
      this.response = response.data
    })
    .catch(e => {
      this.errors.push(e)
    })
}
}

In your template area you can now request a service call via calling callRestService() method and access response data:

<button class=”Search__button” @click="callRestService()">CALL Spring Boot REST backend service</button>

<h3>{{ response }}</h3>

The problem with SOP

Single-Origin Policy (SOP) could be a problem if we want to develop our app. Because the webpack-dev-server runs on http://localhost:8080 and our Spring Boot REST backend on http://localhost:8088.

We need to use Cross-Origin Resource Sharing Protocol (CORS) to handle that (read more background info about CORS here https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Access_control_CORS)

Enabling Axios CORS support

Create a central Axios configuration file called http-commons.js:

import axios from 'axios'

export const AXIOS = axios.create({
  baseURL: `http://localhost:8088`,
  headers: {
    'Access-Control-Allow-Origin': 'http://localhost:8080'
  }
})

Here we allow requests to the base URL of our Spring Boot App on port 8088 to be accessible from 8080.

Now we could use this configuration inside our Components, e.g. in Hello.vue:

import {AXIOS} from './http-common'

export default {
  name: 'hello',

  data () {
    return {
      posts: [],
      errors: []
    }
  },
  methods: {
    // Fetches posts when the component is created.
    callRestService () {
      AXIOS.get(`hello`)
        .then(response => {
          // JSON responses are automatically parsed.
          this.posts = response.data
        })
        .catch(e => {
          this.errors.push(e)
        })
    }
  }

Enabling Spring Boot CORS support

Additionally, we need to configure our Spring Boot backend to answer with the appropriate CORS HTTP Headers in its responses (there's a good tutorial here: https://spring.io/guides/gs/rest-service-cors/). Therefore we add the annotation @CrossOrigin to our BackendController:

@CrossOrigin(origins = "http://localhost:8080")
@RequestMapping(path = "/hello")
public @ResponseBody String sayHello() {
    LOG.info("GET called on /hello resource");
    return HELLO_TEXT;
}

Now our Backend will respond CORS-enabled and will accept requests from 8080. But as this only enables CORS on one method, we have to repeatedly add this annotation to all of our REST endpoints, which isn’t a nice style. We should use a global solution to allow access with CORS enabled to all of our REST resources. This could be done in the SpringBootVuejsApplication.class:

// Enable CORS globally
@Bean
public WebMvcConfigurer corsConfigurer() {
  return new WebMvcConfigurerAdapter() {
    @Override
    public void addCorsMappings(CorsRegistry registry) {
      registry.addMapping("/api/*").allowedOrigins("http://localhost:8080");
    }
  };
}

Now all calls to resources behind api/ will return the correct CORS headers.

But STOP! Webpack & Vue have something much smarter for us to help us with SOP!

Thanks to my colleague Daniel who pointed me to the nice proxying feature of Webpack dev-server, we don't need to configure all the complex CORS stuff anymore!

According to the Vue CLI 3 docs the only thing we need to configure is a devserver-proxy for our webpack devserver requests. This could be done easily in the optional vue.config.js inside devServer.proxy:

module.exports = {
  // proxy all webpack dev-server requests starting with /api
  // to our Spring Boot backend (localhost:8088) using http-proxy-middleware
  // see https://cli.vuejs.org/config/#devserver-proxy
  devServer: {
    proxy: {
      '/api': {
        target: 'http://localhost:8088',
        ws: true,
        changeOrigin: true
      }
    }
  },
  ...
}

With this configuration in place, the webpack dev-server uses the http-proxy-middleware, which is a really handy component, to proxy all frontend-requests from http://localhost:8080 --> http://localhost:8088 - incl. Changing the Origin accordingly.

This is used in the webpack build process to configure the proxyMiddleware (you don't need to change something here!):

// proxy api requests
Object.keys(proxyTable).forEach(function (context) {
  var options = proxyTable[context]
  if (typeof options === 'string') {
    options = { target: options }
  }
  app.use(proxyMiddleware(options.filter || context, options))
})

Bootstrap & Vue.js

There’s a nice integration of Bootstrap in Vue.js: https://bootstrap-vue.js.org/

npm install bootstrap-vue

Now you can use all the pretty Bootstrap stuff with ease like:

<b-btn @click="callRestService()">CALL Spring Boot REST backend service</b-btn>

instead of

<button type="button" class=”btn” @click="callRestService()">CALL Spring Boot REST backend service</button>

The docs contain all the possible components: https://bootstrap-vue.js.org/docs/components/alert/

See some elements, when you go to http://localhost:8080/#/bootstrap/ - this should look like this:

bootstrap-styled-vuejs

A good discussion about various UI component frameworks: http://vuetips.com/bootstrap

Heroku Deployment

As you may already read, the app is automatically deployed to Heroku on https://spring-boot-vuejs.herokuapp.com/.

The project makes use of the nice Heroku Pipelines feature, where we do get a full Continuous Delivery pipeline with nearly no effort:

heroku-pipeline

And with the help of super cool Automatic deploys, we have our TravisCI build our app after every push to master - and with the checkbox set to Wait for CI to pass before deploy - the app gets also automatically deployed to Heroku - but only, if the TravisCI (and Coveralls...) build succeeded:

heroku-automatic-deploys

You only have to connect your Heroku app to GitHub, activate Automatic deploys and set the named checkbox. That's everything!

Accessing Spring Boot REST backend on Heroku from Vue.js frontend

Frontend needs to know the Port of our Spring Boot backend API, which is automatically set by Heroku every time, we (re-)start our App.

You can try out your Heroku app locally! Just create a .env-File with all your Environment variables and run heroku local!

To access the Heroku set port, we need to use relative paths inside our Vue.js application instead of hard-coded hosts and ports!

All we need to do is to configure Axios in such a way inside our frontend/src/components/http-common.js:

export const AXIOS = axios.create({
  baseURL: `/api`
})

Using Heroku's Postgres as Database for Spring Boot backend and Vue.js frontend

First, add Heroku Postgres database for your Heroku app.

Then follow these instructions on Stackoverflow to configure all needed Environment variables in Heroku: https://stackoverflow.com/a/49978310/4964553

Mind the addition to the backend's pom.xml described here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/49970142/4964553

Now you're able to use Spring Data's magic - all you need is an Interface like UserRepository.java:

package de.jonashackt.springbootvuejs.repository;

import de.jonashackt.springbootvuejs.domain.User;
import org.springframework.data.repository.CrudRepository;
import org.springframework.data.repository.query.Param;

import java.util.List;

public interface UserRepository extends CrudRepository<User, Long> {

    List<User> findByLastName(@Param("lastname") String lastname);

    List<User> findByFirstName(@Param("firstname") String firstname);

}

Now write your Testcases accordingly like UserRepositoryTest.java:

package de.jonashackt.springbootvuejs.repository;

import de.jonashackt.springbootvuejs.domain.User;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.junit.runner.RunWith;
import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.boot.test.autoconfigure.orm.jpa.DataJpaTest;
import org.springframework.boot.test.autoconfigure.orm.jpa.TestEntityManager;
import org.springframework.test.context.junit4.SpringRunner;

import java.util.List;

import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.contains;
import static org.junit.Assert.*;

@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@DataJpaTest
public class UserRepositoryTest {

    @Autowired
    private TestEntityManager entityManager;

    @Autowired
    private UserRepository users;

    private User norbertSiegmund = new User("Norbert", "Siegmund");
    private User jonasHecht = new User("Jonas", "Hecht");

    @Before
    public void fillSomeDataIntoOurDb() {
        // Add new Users to Database
        entityManager.persist(norbertSiegmund);
        entityManager.persist(jonasHecht);
    }

    @Test
    public void testFindByLastName() throws Exception {
        // Search for specific User in Database according to lastname
        List<User> usersWithLastNameSiegmund = users.findByLastName("Siegmund");

        assertThat(usersWithLastNameSiegmund, contains(norbertSiegmund));
    }


    @Test
    public void testFindByFirstName() throws Exception {
        // Search for specific User in Database according to firstname
        List<User> usersWithFirstNameJonas = users.findByFirstName("Jonas");

        assertThat(usersWithFirstNameJonas, contains(jonasHecht));
    }

}

Then include this functionality in your REST-API - see BackendController.java:

    @RequestMapping(path = "/user", method = RequestMethod.POST)
    @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.CREATED)
    public @ResponseBody long addNewUser (@RequestParam String firstName, @RequestParam String lastName) {
        User user = new User(firstName, lastName);
        userRepository.save(user);

        LOG.info(user.toString() + " successfully saved into DB");

        return user.getId();
    }

and use it from the Vue.js frontend, see User.vue:

<template>
<div class="user">
 <h1>Create User</h1>

 <h3>Just some database interaction...</h3>

 <input type="text" v-model="user.firstName" placeholder="first name">
 <input type="text" v-model="user.lastName" placeholder="last name">

 <button @click="createUser()">Create User</button>

 <div v-if="showResponse"><h6>User created with Id: {{ response }}</h6></div>

 <button v-if="showResponse" @click="retrieveUser()">Retrieve user {{user.id}} data from database</button>

 <h4 v-if="showRetrievedUser">Retrieved User {{retrievedUser.firstName}} {{retrievedUser.lastName}}</h4>

</div>
</template>

<script>
// import axios from 'axios'
import {AXIOS} from './http-common'

export default {
 name: 'user',

 data () {
   return {
     response: [],
     errors: [],
     user: {
       lastName: '',
       firstName: '',
       id: 0
     },
     showResponse: false,
     retrievedUser: {},
     showRetrievedUser: false
   }
 },
 methods: {
   // Fetches posts when the component is created.
   createUser () {
     var params = new URLSearchParams()
     params.append('firstName', this.user.firstName)
     params.append('lastName', this.user.lastName)

     AXIOS.post(`/user`, params)
       .then(response => {
         // JSON responses are automatically parsed.
         this.response = response.data
         this.user.id = response.data
         console.log(response.data)
         this.showResponse = true
       })
       .catch(e => {
         this.errors.push(e)
       })
   },
   retrieveUser () {
     AXIOS.get(`/user/` + this.user.id)
       .then(response => {
         // JSON responses are automatically parsed.
         this.retrievedUser = response.data
         console.log(response.data)
         this.showRetrievedUser = true
       })
       .catch(e => {
         this.errors.push(e)
       })
   }
 }
}

</script>

Testing

Install vue-test-utils

https://github.com/vuejs/vue-test-utils

npm install --save-dev @vue/test-utils

Jest

Jest is a new shooting star in the sky of JavaScript testing frameworks: https://facebook.github.io/jest/

Intro-Blogpost: https://blog.codecentric.de/2017/06/javascript-unit-tests-sind-schwer-aufzusetzen-keep-calm-use-jest/

Examples: https://github.com/vuejs/vue-test-utils-jest-example

Vue.js Jest Docs: https://vue-test-utils.vuejs.org/guides/#testing-single-file-components-with-jest

A Jest Unittest looks like Hello.spec.js:

import { shallowMount } from '@vue/test-utils';
import Hello from '@/components/Hello'

describe('Hello.vue', () => {
  it('should render correct hello message', () => {
    // Given
    const hellowrapped = shallowMount(Hello, {
      propsData: { hellomsg: 'Welcome to your Jest powered Vue.js App' },
      stubs: ['router-link', 'router-view']
    });

    // When
    const contentH1 = hellowrapped.find('h1');

    // Then
    expect(contentH1.text()).toEqual('Welcome to your Jest powered Vue.js App');
  })
})

To pass Component props while using Vue.js Router, see https://stackoverflow.com/a/37940045/4964553.

How to test components with router-view or router-link https://vue-test-utils.vuejs.org/guides/using-with-vue-router.html#testing-components-that-use-router-link-or-router-view.

The test files itself could be named xyz.spec.js or xyz.test.js - and could reside nearly everywhere in the project.

Jest Configuration

The Jest run-configuration is done inside the package.json:

"scripts": {
    ...
    "test:unit": "vue-cli-service test:unit --coverage",
    ....
  },

Jest can be configured via jest.config.js in your project root, or the jest field in package.json. In our case we especially need to configure coverageDirectory:

  ],
  "jest": {
    ...
    "coverageDirectory": "<rootDir>/tests/unit/coverage",
    "collectCoverageFrom": [
      "src/**/*.{js,vue}",
      "!src/main.js",
      "!src/router/index.js",
      "!**/node_modules/**"
    ]
  }
}

Jest needs to know the right output directory /tests/unit/coverage to show a correct output when npm run test:unit is run (or the corresponding Maven build). If you run the Jest Unit tests now with:

npm run test:unit

  • you´ll recognize the table of test covered files:

unittestrun-jest

Integration in Maven build (via frontend-maven-plugin)

Inside the pom.xml we always automatically run the Jest Unittests with the following configuration:

<!-- Run Unit tests -->
  <execution>
    <id>npm run test:unit</id>
    <goals>
      <goal>npm</goal>
    </goals>
    <!-- optional: default phase is "generate-resources" -->
    <phase>test</phase>
    <!-- Optional configuration which provides for running any npm command -->
    <configuration>
      <arguments>run test:unit</arguments>
    </configuration>
  </execution>

This will integrate the Jest Unittests right after the npm run build command, just you are used to in Java-style projects:

maven-integration-jest-unittests

And don't mind the depiction with ERROR - this is just a known bug: https://github.com/eirslett/frontend-maven-plugin/issues/584

Run Jest tests inside IntelliJ

First, we need to install the NodeJS IntelliJ plugin (https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/developing-node-js-applications.html), which isn't bundled with IntelliJ by default:

nodejs-intellij-plugin

IntelliJ Jest integration docs: https://www.jetbrains.com/help/idea/running-unit-tests-on-jest.html

The automatic search inside the package.json for the Jest configuration file jest.conf.js doesn't seem to work right now, so we have to manually configure the scripts part of:

"unit": "jest --config test/unit/jest.conf.js --coverage",

inside the Run Configuration under Jest and All Tests:

configure-jest-inside-intellij

Now, when running All Tests, this should look like you're already used to Unittest IntelliJ-Integration:

run-jest-inside-intellij

End-2-End (E2E) tests with Nightwatch

Great tooling: http://nightwatchjs.org/ - Nightwatch controls WebDriver / Selenium standalone Server in own child process and abstracts from those, providing a handy DSL for Acceptance tests:

Docs: http://nightwatchjs.org/gettingstarted/#browser-drivers-setup

http://nightwatchjs.org/img/operation.png

Nightwatch is configured through the nightwatch.conf.js. Watch out for breaking changes in 1.x: https://github.com/nightwatchjs/nightwatch/wiki/Migrating-to-Nightwatch-1.0

More options could be found in the docs: http://nightwatchjs.org/gettingstarted/#settings-file

Write Nightwatch tests

An example Nightwatch test is provided in HelloAcceptance.test.js:

module.exports = {
    'default e2e tests': browser => {
        browser
            .url(process.env.VUE_DEV_SERVER_URL)
            .waitForElementVisible('#app', 5000)
            .assert.elementPresent('.hello')
            .assert.containsText('h1', 'Welcome to your Vue.js powered Spring Boot App')
            .assert.elementCount('img', 1)
            .end()
    }
}
Run E2E Tests

npm run test:e2e

Run all tests

npm test

NPM Security

npm Security - npm@6

https://medium.com/npm-inc/announcing-npm-6-5d0b1799a905

npm audit

https://blog.npmjs.org/post/173719309445/npm-audit-identify-and-fix-insecure

Run npm audit fix to update the vulnerable packages. Only in situations, where nothing else helps, try npm audit fix --force (this will also install braking changes)

https://nodejs.org/en/blog/vulnerability/june-2018-security-releases/

---> Update NPM regularly

https://docs.npmjs.com/troubleshooting/try-the-latest-stable-version-of-npm

npm install -g npm@latest

---> Update Packages regularly

https://docs.npmjs.com/getting-started/updating-local-packages

npm outdated

npm update

Shift from templates to plugin-based architecture in Vue Cli 3

In the long run, templates like the main webpack are deprecated in the Vue.js universe:

https://vuejsdevelopers.com/2018/03/26/vue-cli-3/

Plugins bring the following benefits compared to templates:

  • No lock in, as plugins can be added at any point in the development lifecycle
  • Zero config plugins allow you to spend time developing rather than configuring
  • Easy to upgrade, as configuration can be customized without “ejecting”
  • Allows developers to make their own plugins and presets

Starting point: https://cli.vuejs.org/

OMG! My package.json is so small - Vue CLI 3 Plugins

From https://cli.vuejs.org/guide/plugins-and-presets.html:

Vue CLI uses a plugin-based architecture. If you inspect a newly created project's package.json, you will find dependencies that start with @vue/cli-plugin-. Plugins can modify the internal webpack configuration and inject commands to vue-cli-service. Most of the features listed during the project creation process are implemented as plugins.

With plugings, extensions to an existing project could also be made via: vue add pluginName. E.g. if you want to add Nightwatch E2E tests to your project, just run vue add @vue/e2e-nightwatch. All scoped packages are available here: https://github.com/vuejs/vue-cli/tree/dev/packages/%40vue

These new Vue CLI 3 plugin architecture cleans our big package.json to a really neat compact thing. This was the old big dependency block:

  "devDependencies": {
    "@vue/test-utils": "^1.0.0-beta.25",
    "autoprefixer": "^7.1.2",
    "babel-core": "^6.26.3",
    "babel-helper-vue-jsx-merge-props": "^2.0.3",
    "babel-jest": "^21.0.2",
    "babel-loader": "^7.1.5",
    "babel-plugin-dynamic-import-node": "^1.2.0",
    "babel-plugin-syntax-jsx": "^6.18.0",
    "babel-plugin-transform-es2015-modules-commonjs": "^6.26.0",
    "babel-plugin-transform-runtime": "^6.22.0",
    "babel-plugin-transform-vue-jsx": "^3.5.0",
    "babel-preset-env": "^1.7.0",
    "babel-preset-stage-2": "^6.22.0",
    "babel-register": "^6.22.0",
    "chalk": "^2.4.1",
    "chromedriver": "^2.41.0",
    "copy-webpack-plugin": "^4.5.2",
    "cross-spawn": "^5.0.1",
    "css-loader": "^0.28.0",
    "extract-text-webpack-plugin": "^3.0.0",
    "file-loader": "^1.1.4",
    "friendly-errors-webpack-plugin": "^1.6.1",
    "html-webpack-plugin": "^2.30.1",
    "jest": "^22.0.4",
    "jest-serializer-vue": "^0.3.0",
    "nightwatch": "^1.0.11",
    "node-notifier": "^5.1.2",
    "optimize-css-assets-webpack-plugin": "^3.2.0",
    "ora": "^1.2.0",
    "portfinder": "^1.0.17",
    "postcss-import": "^11.0.0",
    "postcss-loader": "^2.1.6",
    "postcss-url": "^7.2.1",
    "rimraf": "^2.6.0",
    "selenium-server": "^3.14.0",
    "semver": "^5.5.1",
    "shelljs": "^0.7.6",
    "uglifyjs-webpack-plugin": "^1.3.0",
    "url-loader": "^1.1.1",
    "vue-jest": "^1.0.2",
    "vue-loader": "^13.7.3",
    "vue-style-loader": "^3.0.1",
    "vue-template-compiler": "^2.5.17",
    "webpack": "^3.6.0",
    "webpack-bundle-analyzer": "^2.13.1",
    "webpack-dev-server": "^2.11.3",
    "webpack-merge": "^4.1.4"
  },

As you can see, we´re not only maintaining our high-level libraries of choice like nightwatch, jest and so on. We´re also maintaining libraries that they use itself. Now this is over with Vue CLI 3. Let´s have a look at the super clean dependency block now:

"devDependencies": {
    "@vue/cli-plugin-babel": "^3.0.3",
    "@vue/cli-plugin-e2e-nightwatch": "^3.0.3",
    "@vue/cli-plugin-unit-jest": "^3.0.3",
    "@vue/cli-service": "^3.0.3",
    "@vue/test-utils": "^1.0.0-beta.20",
    "babel-core": "7.0.0-bridge.0",
    "babel-jest": "^23.0.1",
    "node-sass": "^4.9.0",
    "sass-loader": "^7.0.1",
    "vue-template-compiler": "^2.5.17"
  },

As you dig into the directories like node_modules/@vue/cli-plugin-e2e-nightwatch, you´ll find where the used libraries of nightwatch are configured - in the respective package.json there:

  "dependencies": {
    "@vue/cli-shared-utils": "^3.0.2",
    "chromedriver": "^2.40.0",
    "deepmerge": "^2.1.1",
    "execa": "^0.10.0",
    "nightwatch": "^0.9.21",
    "selenium-server": "^3.13.0"
  },

This is really cool, I have to admit!

The vue.config.js file

Vue CLI 3 removes the need for explicit configuration files - and thus you wont find any build or config directories in your projects root any more. This now implements a "convention over configuration" approach, which makes it much easier to kick-start a Vue.js project, as it provides widly used defaults to webpack etc. It also eases the upgradeability of Vue.js projects - or even makes it possible.

But: How do we configure webpack etc. for CORS handling, the build directories and so on? This could be done with the optional vue.config.js:

module.exports = {
  // proxy all webpack dev-server requests starting with /api
  // to our Spring Boot backend (localhost:8088) using http-proxy-middleware
  // see https://cli.vuejs.org/config/#devserver-proxy
  devServer: {
    proxy: {
      '/api': {
        target: 'http://localhost:8088',
        ws: true,
        changeOrigin: true
      }
    }
  },
  // Change build paths to make them Maven compatible
  // see https://cli.vuejs.org/config/
  outputDir: 'target/dist'
}

Links

Nice introductory video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6hQqgvGI4Y

Examples: https://vuejs.org/v2/examples/

Easy to use web-based Editor: https://vuejs.org/v2/examples/

http://vuetips.com/