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README.md

Fargate CLI

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Screencast

fargate CLI screencast

Usage

Configuration

Region

By default, fargate uses us-east-1 as this is the single region where AWS Fargate is available. The CLI accepts a --region parameter for future use and will honor AWS_REGION and AWS_DEFAULT_REGION environment settings. Note that specifying a region where all required services aren't available will return an error.

See the Region Table for a breakdown of what services are available in which regions.

Credentials

fargate is built using the AWS SDK for Go which looks for credentials in the following locations:

  1. Environment Variables

  2. Shared Credentials File

  3. EC2 Instance Profile

For more information see Specifying Credentials in the AWS SDK for Go documentation.

Commands

Global Flags

Flag Default Description
--cluster fargate ECS cluster name
--region us-east-1 AWS region
--no-color false Disable color output
--verbose false Verbose output

Tasks

Tasks are one-time executions of your container. Instances of your task are run until you manually stop them either through AWS APIs, the AWS Management Console, or fargate task stop, or until they are interrupted for any reason.

fargate task list
fargate task list

List running task groups

fargate task run
fargate task run <task-group-name> [--num <count>] [--cpu <cpu-units>] [--memory <MiB>]
                                   [--image <docker-image>] [--env <key=value>]
                                   [--task-role <task-role>] [--subnet-id <subnet-id>]
                                   [--security-group-id <security-group-id>]

Run new tasks

You must specify a task group name in order to interact with the task(s) in subsequent commands to view logs, stop and inspect tasks. Task group names do not have to be unique -- multiple configurations of task instances can be started with the same task group.

Multiple instances of a task can be run by specifying a number in the --num flag. If no number is specified, a single task instance will be run.

CPU and memory settings can be optionally specified as CPU units and mebibytes respectively using the --cpu and --memory flags. Every 1024 CPU units is equivilent to a single vCPU. AWS Fargate only supports certain combinations of CPU and memory configurations:

CPU (CPU Units) Memory (MiB)
256 512, 1024, or 2048
512 1024 through 4096 in 1GiB increments
1024 2048 through 8192 in 1GiB increments
2048 4096 through 16384 in 1GiB increments
4096 8192 through 30720 in 1GiB increments

If not specified, fargate will launch minimally sized tasks at 0.25 vCPU (256 CPU units) and 0.5GB (512 MiB) of memory.

The Docker container image to use in the task can be optionally specified via the --image flag. If not specified, fargate will build a new Docker container image from the current working directory and push it to Amazon ECR in a repository named for the task group. If the current working directory is a git repository, the container image will be tagged with the short ref of the HEAD commit. If not, a timestamp in the format of YYYYMMDDHHMMSS will be used.

Environment variables can be specified via the --env flag. Specify --env with a key=value parameter multiple times to add multiple variables.

Security groups can optionally be specified for the task by passing the --security-group-id flag with a security group ID. To add multiple security groups, pass --security-group-id with a security group ID multiple times. If --security-group-id is omitted, a permissive security group will be applied to the task.

By default, the task will be created in the default VPC and attached to the default VPC subnets for each availability zone. You can override this by specifying explicit subnets by passing the --subnet-id flag with a subnet ID.

A task role can be optionally specified via the --task-role flag by providing eith a full IAM role ARN or the name of an IAM role. The tasks will be able to assume this role.

fargate task info
fargate task info <task-group-name> [--task <task-id>]

Inspect tasks

Shows extended information for each running task within a task group or for specific tasks specified with the --task flag. Information includes environment variables which could differ between tasks in a task group. To inspect multiple specific tasks within a task group specific --task with a task ID multiple times.

fargate task ps
fargate task ps <task-group-name>

List running tasks

fargate task logs
fargate task logs <task-group-name> [--follow] [--start <time-expression>] [--end <time-expression>]
                                    [--filter <filter-expression>] [--task <task-id>]

Show logs from tasks

Return either a specific segment of task logs or tail logs in real-time using the --follow option. Logs are prefixed by their log stream name which is in the format of "fargate/<task-group-name>/<task-id>."

Follow will continue to run and return logs until interrupted by Control-C. If --follow is passed --end cannot be specified.

Logs can be returned for specific tasks within a task group by passing a task ID via the --task flag. Pass --task with a task ID multiple times in order to retrieve logs from multiple specific tasks.

A specific window of logs can be requested by passing --start and --end options with a time expression. The time expression can be either a duration or a timestamp:

  • Duration (e.g. -1h [one hour ago], -1h10m30s [one hour, ten minutes, and thirty seconds ago], 2h [two hours from now])
  • Timestamp with optional timezone in the format of YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS [TZ]; timezone will default to UTC if omitted (e.g. 2017-12-22 15:10:03 EST)

You can filter logs for specific term by passing a filter expression via the --filter flag. Pass a single term to search for that term, pass multiple terms to search for log messages that include all terms. See the CloudWatch Logs documentation for more details.

fargate task stop
fargate task stop <task-group-name> [--task <task-id>]

Stop tasks

Stops all tasks within a task group if run with only a task group name or stops individual tasks if one or more tasks are passed via the --task flag. Specify --task with a task ID parameter multiple times to stop multiple specific tasks.

Services

Services manage long-lived instances of your containers that are run on AWS Fargate. If your container exits for any reason, the service scheduler will restart your containers and ensure your service has the desired number of tasks running. Services can be used in concert with a load balancer to distribute traffic amongst the tasks in your service.

fargate service list
fargate service list

List services

fargate service create
fargate service create <service name> [--cpu <cpu units>] [--memory <MiB>] [--port <port-expression>]
                                      [--lb <load-balancer-name>] [--rule <rule-expression>]
                                      [--image <docker-image>] [--env <key=value>] [--num <count>]
                                      [--task-role <task-role>] [--subnet-id <subnet-id>]
                                      [--security-group-id <security-group-id>]

Create a new service

CPU and memory settings can be optionally specified as CPU units and mebibytes respectively using the --cpu and --memory flags. Every 1024 CPU units is equivilent to a single vCPU. AWS Fargate only supports certain combinations of CPU and memory configurations:

CPU (CPU Units) Memory (MiB)
256 512, 1024, or 2048
512 1024 through 4096 in 1GiB increments
1024 2048 through 8192 in 1GiB increments
2048 4096 through 16384 in 1GiB increments
4096 8192 through 30720 in 1GiB increments

If not specified, fargate will launch minimally sized tasks at 0.25 vCPU (256 CPU units) and 0.5GB (512 MiB) of memory.

The Docker container image to use in the service can be optionally specified via the --image flag. If not specified, fargate will build a new Docker container image from the current working directory and push it to Amazon ECR in a repository named for the task group. If the current working directory is a git repository, the container image will be tagged with the short ref of the HEAD commit. If not, a timestamp in the format of YYYYMMDDHHMMSS will be used.

To use the service with a load balancer, a port must be specified when the service is created. Specify a port by passing the --port flag and a port expression of protocol:port-number. For example, if the service listens on port 80 and uses HTTP, specify HTTP:80. Valid protocols are HTTP, HTTPS, and TCP. You can only specify a single port.

Services can optionally be configured to use a load balancer. To put a load balancer in front a service, pass the --lb flag with the name of a load balancer. If you specify a load balancer, you must also specify a port via the --port flag to which the load balancer should forward requests. Optionally, Application Load Balancers can be configured to route HTTP/HTTPS traffic to the service based upon a rule. Rules are configured by passing one or more rules by specifying the --rule flag along with a rule expression. Rule expressions are in the format of TYPE=VALUE. Type can either be PATH or HOST. PATH matches the PATH of the request and HOST matches the requested hostname in the HTTP request. Both PATH and HOST types can include up to three wildcard characters: * to match multiple characters and ? to match a single character. If rules are omitted, the service will be the load balancer's default action.

Environment variables can be specified via the --env flag. Specify --env with a key=value parameter multiple times to add multiple variables.

Specify the desired count of tasks the service should maintain by passing the --num flag with a number. If you omit this flag, fargate will configure a service with a desired number of tasks of 1.

Security groups can optionally be specified for the service by passing the --security-group-id flag with a security group ID. To add multiple security groups, pass --security-group-id with a security group ID multiple times. If --security-group-id is omitted, a permissive security group will be applied to the service.

By default, the service will be created in the default VPC and attached to the default VPC subnets for each availability zone. You can override this by specifying explicit subnets by passing the --subnet-id flag with a subnet ID.

A task role can be optionally specified via the --task-role flag by providing eith a full IAM role ARN or the name of an IAM role. The tasks run by the service will be able to assume this role.

fargate service deploy
fargate service deploy <service-name> [--image <docker-image>]

Deploy new image to service

The Docker container image to use in the service can be optionally specified via the --image flag. If not specified, fargate will build a new Docker container image from the current working directory and push it to Amazon ECR in a repository named for the task group. If the current working directory is a git repository, the container image will be tagged with the short ref of the HEAD commit. If not, a timestamp in the format of YYYYMMDDHHMMSS will be used.

fargate service info
fargate service info <service-name>

Inspect service

Show extended information for a service including load balancer configuration, active deployments, and environment variables.

Deployments show active versions of your service that are running. Multiple deployments are shown if a service is transitioning due to a deployment or update to configuration such a CPU, memory, or environment variables.

fargate service logs
fargate service logs <service-name> [--follow] [--start <time-expression>] [--end <time-expression>]
                                    [--filter <filter-expression>] [--task <task-id>]

Show logs from tasks in a service

Return either a specific segment of service logs or tail logs in real-time using the --follow option. Logs are prefixed by their log stream name which is in the format of "fargate/<service-name>/<task-id>."

Follow will continue to run and return logs until interrupted by Control-C. If --follow is passed --end cannot be specified.

Logs can be returned for specific tasks within a service by passing a task ID via the --task flag. Pass --task with a task ID multiple times in order to retrieve logs from multiple specific tasks.

A specific window of logs can be requested by passing --start and --end options with a time expression. The time expression can be either a duration or a timestamp:

  • Duration (e.g. -1h [one hour ago], -1h10m30s [one hour, ten minutes, and thirty seconds ago], 2h [two hours from now])
  • Timestamp with optional timezone in the format of YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS [TZ]; timezone will default to UTC if omitted (e.g. 2017-12-22 15:10:03 EST)

You can filter logs for specific term by passing a filter expression via the --filter flag. Pass a single term to search for that term, pass multiple terms to search for log messages that include all terms. See the CloudWatch Logs documentation for more details.

fargate service ps
fargate service ps <service-name>

List running tasks for a service

fargate service scale
fargate service scale <service-name> <scale-expression>

Scale number of tasks in a service

Changes the number of desired tasks to be run in a service by the given scale expression. A scale expression can either be an absolute number or a delta specified with a sign such as +5 or -2.

fargate service env set
fargate service env set <service-name> --env <key=value>

Set environment variables

At least one environment variable must be specified via the --env flag. Specify --env with a key=value parameter multiple times to add multiple variables.

fargate service env unset
fargate service env unset <service-name> --key <key-name>

Unset environment variables

Unsets the environment variable specified via the --key flag. Specify --key with a key name multiple times to unset multiple variables.

fargate service env list
fargate service env list <service-name>

Show environment variables

fargate service update
fargate service update <service-name> [--cpu <cpu-units>] [--memory <MiB>]

Update service configuration

CPU and memory settings are specified as CPU units and mebibytes respectively using the --cpu and --memory flags. Every 1024 CPU units is equivilent to a single vCPU. AWS Fargate only supports certain combinations of CPU and memory configurations:

CPU (CPU Units) Memory (MiB)
256 512, 1024, or 2048
512 1024 through 4096 in 1GiB increments
1024 2048 through 8192 in 1GiB increments
2048 4096 through 16384 in 1GiB increments
4096 8192 through 30720 in 1GiB increments

At least one of --cpu or --memory must be specified.

fargate service restart
fargate service restart <service-name>

Restart service

Creates a new set of tasks for the service and stops the previous tasks. This is useful if your service needs to reload data cached from an external source, for example.

fargate service destroy
fargate service destroy <service-name>

Destroy service

In order to destroy a service, it must first be scaled to 0 running tasks.

Load Balancers

Load balancers distribute incoming traffic between the tasks within a service for HTTP/HTTPS and TCP applications. HTTP/HTTPS load balancers can route to multiple services based upon rules you specify when you create a new service.

fargate lb list
fargate lb list

List load balancers

fargate lb create
fargate lb create <load-balancer-name> --port <port-expression> [--certificate <certificate-name>]
                                       [--subnet-id <subnet-id>] [--security-group-id <security-group-id>]

Create a load balancer

At least one port must be specified for the load balancer listener via the --port flag and a port expression of protocol:port-number. For example, if you wanted an HTTP load balancer to listen on port 80, you would specify HTTP:80. Valid protocols are HTTP, HTTPS, and TCP. You can specify multiple listeners by passing the --port flag with a port expression multiple times. You cannot mix TCP ports with HTTP/HTTPS ports on a single load balancer.

You can optionally include certificates to secure HTTPS ports by passed the --certificate flag along with a certificate name. This option can be specified multiple times to add additional certificates to a single load balancer which uses Service Name Identification (SNI) to select the appropriate certificate for the request.

By default, the load balancer will be created in the default VPC and attached to the default VPC subnets for each availability zone. You can override this by specifying explicit subnets by passing the --subnet-id flag with a subnet ID. HTTP/HTTPS load balancers require at least two subnets attached while a TCP load balancer requires only one. You may only specify a single subnet from each availability zone.

Security groups can optionally be specified for HTTP/HTTPS load balancers by passing the --security-group-id flag with a security group ID. To add multiple security groups, pass --security-group-id with a security group ID multiple times. If --security-group-id is omitted, a permissive security group will be applied to the load balancer.

fargate lb destroy
fargate lb destroy <load-balancer-name>

Destroy load balancer

fargate lb alias
fargate lb alias <load-balancer-name> <hostname>

Create a load balancer alias record

Create an alias record to the load balancer for domains that are hosted within Amazon Route 53 and within the same AWS account. If you're using another DNS provider or host your domains in a different account, you will need to manually create this record.

fargate lb info
fargate lb info <load-balancer-name>

Inspect load balancer

Returns extended information about a load balancer including a list of listeners, rules, and certificates in use by the load balancer.

Certificates

Certificates are TLS certificates issued by or imported into AWS Certificate Manager for use in securing traffic between load balancers and end users. ACM provides TLS certificates free of charge for use within AWS resources.

fargate certificate list
fargate certificate list

List certificates

fargate certificate import
fargate certificate import <domain-name> --certificate <filename> --key <filename> [--chain <filename>]

Import a certificate

Upload a certificate from a certificate file, a private key file, and optionally an intermediate certificate chain file. The files must be PEM-encoded and the private key must not be encrypted or protected by a passphrase. See the AWS Certificate Manager documentation for more details.

fargate certificate request
fargate certificate request <domain-name> [--alias <domain-name>]

Request a certificate

Certificates can be for a fully qualified domain name (e.g. www.example.com) or a wildcard domain name (e.g. *.example.com). You can add aliases to a certificate by specifying additional domain names via the --alias flag. To add multiple aliases, pass --alias multiple times. By default, AWS Certificate Manager has a limit of 10 domain names per certificate, but this limit can be raised by AWS support.

fargate certificate info
fargate certificate info <domain-name>

Inspect certificate

Show extended information for a certificate. Includes each validation for the certificate which shows DNS records which must be created to validate domain ownership.

fargate certificate validate
fargate certificate validate <domain-name>

Validate certificate ownership

fargate will automatically create DNS validation record to verify ownership for any domain names that are hosted within Amazon Route 53. If your certificate has aliases, a validation record will be attempted per alias. Any records whose domains are hosted in other DNS hosting providers or in other DNS accounts and cannot be automatically validated will have the necessary records output. These records are also available in fargate certificate info \<domain-name>.

AWS Certificate Manager may take up to several hours after the DNS records are created to complete validation and issue the certificate.

fargate certificate destroy
fargate certificate destroy <domain-name>

Destroy certificate

In order to destroy a certificate, it must not be in use by any load balancers or any other AWS resources.