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doc: update doc to remove usage of "you"

As per style guide avoid the use of you, your etc.
Rational as per: http://www2.ivcc.edu/rambo/tip_formal_writing_voice.htm

PR-URL: #13067
Reviewed-By: Colin Ihrig <cjihrig@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Sakthipriyan Vairamani <thechargingvolcano@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Luigi Pinca <luigipinca@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: Alexey Orlenko <eaglexrlnk@gmail.com>
Reviewed-By: James M Snell <jasnell@gmail.com>
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mhdawson committed May 16, 2017
1 parent a593c74 commit ab34f9dec200490c935c179f0f3244c3fa38cc88
Showing with 26 additions and 26 deletions.
  1. +26 −26 doc/guides/writing-and-running-benchmarks.md
@@ -27,24 +27,24 @@ either [`wrk`][wrk] or [`autocannon`][autocannon].
`Autocannon` is a Node.js script that can be installed using
`npm install -g autocannon`. It will use the Node.js executable that is in the
path. Hence if you want to compare two HTTP benchmark runs, make sure that the
path. In order to compare two HTTP benchmark runs, make sure that the
Node.js version in the path is not altered.
`wrk` may be available through your preferred package manager. If not, you can
easily build it [from source][wrk] via `make`.
`wrk` may be available through one of the available package managers. If not, it can
be easily built [from source][wrk] via `make`.
By default, `wrk` will be used as the benchmarker. If it is not available,
`autocannon` will be used in its place. When creating an HTTP benchmark, you can
specify which benchmarker should be used by providing it as an argument:
`autocannon` will be used in its place. When creating an HTTP benchmark, the
benchmarker to be used should be specified by providing it as an argument:
`node benchmark/run.js --set benchmarker=autocannon http`
`node benchmark/http/simple.js benchmarker=autocannon`
### Benchmark Analysis Requirements
To analyze the results, `R` should be installed. Use your package manager or
download it from https://www.r-project.org/.
To analyze the results, `R` should be installed. Use one of the available
package managers or download it from https://www.r-project.org/.
The R packages `ggplot2` and `plyr` are also used and can be installed using
the R REPL.
@@ -55,8 +55,8 @@ install.packages("ggplot2")
install.packages("plyr")
```
In the event you get a message that you need to select a CRAN mirror first, you
can specify a mirror by adding in the repo parameter.
In the event that a message is reported stating that a CRAN mirror must be
selected first, specify a mirror by adding in the repo parameter.
If we used the "http://cran.us.r-project.org" mirror, it could look something
like this:
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ like this:
install.packages("ggplot2", repo="http://cran.us.r-project.org")
```
Of course, use the mirror that suits your location.
Of course, use an appropriate mirror based on location.
A list of mirrors is [located here](https://cran.r-project.org/mirrors.html).
## Running benchmarks
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ process. This ensures that benchmark results aren't affected by the execution
order due to v8 optimizations. **The last number is the rate of operations
measured in ops/sec (higher is better).**
Furthermore you can specify a subset of the configurations, by setting them in
Furthermore a subset of the configurations can be specified, by setting them in
the process arguments:
```console
@@ -179,9 +179,9 @@ In the output, _improvement_ is the relative improvement of the new version,
hopefully this is positive. _confidence_ tells if there is enough
statistical evidence to validate the _improvement_. If there is enough evidence
then there will be at least one star (`*`), more stars is just better. **However
if there are no stars, then you shouldn't make any conclusions based on the
_improvement_.** Sometimes this is fine, for example if you are expecting there
to be no improvements, then there shouldn't be any stars.
if there are no stars, then don't make any conclusions based on the
_improvement_.** Sometimes this is fine, for example if no improvements are
expected, then there shouldn't be any stars.
**A word of caution:** Statistics is not a foolproof tool. If a benchmark shows
a statistical significant difference, there is a 5% risk that this
@@ -198,9 +198,9 @@ same for both versions. The confidence field will show a star if the p-value
is less than `0.05`._
The `compare.R` tool can also produce a box plot by using the `--plot filename`
option. In this case there are 48 different benchmark combinations, thus you
may want to filter the csv file. This can be done while benchmarking using the
`--set` parameter (e.g. `--set encoding=ascii`) or by filtering results
option. In this case there are 48 different benchmark combinations, and there
may be a need to filter the csv file. This can be done while benchmarking
using the `--set` parameter (e.g. `--set encoding=ascii`) or by filtering results
afterwards using tools such as `sed` or `grep`. In the `sed` case be sure to
keep the first line since that contains the header information.
@@ -295,7 +295,7 @@ chunk encoding mean confidence.interval
### Basics of a benchmark
All benchmarks use the `require('../common.js')` module. This contains the
`createBenchmark(main, configs[, options])` method which will setup your
`createBenchmark(main, configs[, options])` method which will setup the
benchmark.
The arguments of `createBenchmark` are:
@@ -312,20 +312,20 @@ The arguments of `createBenchmark` are:
`createBenchmark` returns a `bench` object, which is used for timing
the runtime of the benchmark. Run `bench.start()` after the initialization
and `bench.end(n)` when the benchmark is done. `n` is the number of operations
you performed in the benchmark.
performed in the benchmark.
The benchmark script will be run twice:
The first pass will configure the benchmark with the combination of
parameters specified in `configs`, and WILL NOT run the `main` function.
In this pass, no flags except the ones directly passed via commands
that you run the benchmarks with will be used.
when running the benchmarks will be used.
In the second pass, the `main` function will be run, and the process
will be launched with:
* The flags you've passed into `createBenchmark` (the third argument)
* The flags in the command that you run this benchmark with
* The flags passed into `createBenchmark` (the third argument)
* The flags in the command passed when the benchmark was run
Beware that any code outside the `main` function will be run twice
in different processes. This could be troublesome if the code
@@ -346,7 +346,7 @@ const configs = {
};
const options = {
// Add --expose-internals if you want to require internal modules in main
// Add --expose-internals in order to require internal modules in main
flags: ['--zero-fill-buffers']
};
@@ -357,9 +357,9 @@ const bench = common.createBenchmark(main, configs, options);
// in different processes, with different command line arguments.
function main(conf) {
// You will only get the flags that you have passed to createBenchmark
// earlier when main is run. If you want to benchmark the internal modules,
// require them here. For example:
// Only flags that have been passed to createBenchmark
// earlier when main is run will be in effect.
// In order to benchmark the internal modules, require them here. For example:
// const URL = require('internal/url').URL
// Start the timer

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