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Pash is now obsolete #429

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mdolezel opened this Issue Aug 18, 2016 · 8 comments

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@mdolezel

Microsoft has released its implementation of powershell for Windows, Linux, OSX.

See at https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell

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ForNeVeR Aug 19, 2016

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Well, that's really nice.

I am not sure what to do with Pash codebase now though :(

I don't think we want to split the community in any way, so should we really obsolete the project and direct any possible contributors to https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell? Or maybe we could change Pash in some way so it doesn't compete with PowerShell, but upgrades the UX, for example, or make it a set of useful commands, or something?

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ForNeVeR commented Aug 19, 2016

Well, that's really nice.

I am not sure what to do with Pash codebase now though :(

I don't think we want to split the community in any way, so should we really obsolete the project and direct any possible contributors to https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell? Or maybe we could change Pash in some way so it doesn't compete with PowerShell, but upgrades the UX, for example, or make it a set of useful commands, or something?

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JayBazuzi Aug 19, 2016

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When I picked up the Pash project, it was because I wanted PowerShell on Linux. I think PowerShell is great, and missed it dearly when I needed to use Linux. I also realized that people who have to manage a heterogeneous collection of computers would benefit from a single technology that could be used to manage them all.

Microsoft's announcement today meets both of these needs, and meets them well. I am happy.

I'm really proud of the work that folks have put in to Pash. I think it's amazing the way a loose-nit group of internet strangers were able to come together and carry this project forward. Well done all.

I don't see value in continuing to work on Pash, but hey, it's open source. If anyone sees value to be created, and feels called to do the work, go for it!

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JayBazuzi commented Aug 19, 2016

When I picked up the Pash project, it was because I wanted PowerShell on Linux. I think PowerShell is great, and missed it dearly when I needed to use Linux. I also realized that people who have to manage a heterogeneous collection of computers would benefit from a single technology that could be used to manage them all.

Microsoft's announcement today meets both of these needs, and meets them well. I am happy.

I'm really proud of the work that folks have put in to Pash. I think it's amazing the way a loose-nit group of internet strangers were able to come together and carry this project forward. Well done all.

I don't see value in continuing to work on Pash, but hey, it's open source. If anyone sees value to be created, and feels called to do the work, go for it!

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kilasuit Aug 19, 2016

As you guys have been doing more and more work on PowerShell in a cross platform world it would be great to get you guys contributing to the PowerShell repo too.

I'm not very clear on the differences between Mono & .Net Core but you guys are better clued up than I am and I would expect there to be at least some level of overlap between the two

As you guys have been doing more and more work on PowerShell in a cross platform world it would be great to get you guys contributing to the PowerShell repo too.

I'm not very clear on the differences between Mono & .Net Core but you guys are better clued up than I am and I would expect there to be at least some level of overlap between the two

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ygra Aug 19, 2016

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Well, Mono tries to align with Desktop .NET, while .NET Core also introduced a few breaking changes. However, I doubt the differences matter much to PowerShell or Pash.

One possible course of action would be attempting to bring over parts of Pash that don't exist in PowerShell. Although I guess there aren't many of those. The current cross-platform PowerShell will likely lack cmdlets that use Windows-specific functioanality for now, e.g. working with the event log, but it's unlikely that we already have those and could port them over.

As for me, I learned a lot about how PowerShell works, about how an interpreter can work. I managed to bring over a testing approach that @sburnicki implemented for Pash (having the same tests run for Pash and PowerShell for verification) into a project at work; thanks for teaching me, Stefan :)

In the end, Pash has been useful for some already (e.g. MonoDevelop) and most contributors these days don't seem to find much time to continue contributing; I'm guilty there as well. And PowerShell is probably in a better state right now and attracting more contributors by virtue of being the official project. Pash was essentially built to fill a gap, which now disappeared. We shouldn't get too attached to code we wrote anyway :-)

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ygra commented Aug 19, 2016

Well, Mono tries to align with Desktop .NET, while .NET Core also introduced a few breaking changes. However, I doubt the differences matter much to PowerShell or Pash.

One possible course of action would be attempting to bring over parts of Pash that don't exist in PowerShell. Although I guess there aren't many of those. The current cross-platform PowerShell will likely lack cmdlets that use Windows-specific functioanality for now, e.g. working with the event log, but it's unlikely that we already have those and could port them over.

As for me, I learned a lot about how PowerShell works, about how an interpreter can work. I managed to bring over a testing approach that @sburnicki implemented for Pash (having the same tests run for Pash and PowerShell for verification) into a project at work; thanks for teaching me, Stefan :)

In the end, Pash has been useful for some already (e.g. MonoDevelop) and most contributors these days don't seem to find much time to continue contributing; I'm guilty there as well. And PowerShell is probably in a better state right now and attracting more contributors by virtue of being the official project. Pash was essentially built to fill a gap, which now disappeared. We shouldn't get too attached to code we wrote anyway :-)

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sburnicki Aug 23, 2016

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For me it was clear for most of the time that it will be impossible with our manpower to get completely compatible with Powershell, it's just too complex.

It's cool that people were able to use it for some time and that people learned from this project. I personally had a lot of fun coding for Pash and even better: I learned a lot. To be honest, I learned more about .NET and Powershell than I wanted to learn in the first place 😁 And I'm not even mad that other people now need to implement the complicated stuff 😉

We shouldn't be sad that Pash got obsolete, but happy that a company took the reason for Pash to exist serious and took the idea to a professional level. And we guys can put our energy in other cool projects that desparately need contributors. 👍

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sburnicki commented Aug 23, 2016

For me it was clear for most of the time that it will be impossible with our manpower to get completely compatible with Powershell, it's just too complex.

It's cool that people were able to use it for some time and that people learned from this project. I personally had a lot of fun coding for Pash and even better: I learned a lot. To be honest, I learned more about .NET and Powershell than I wanted to learn in the first place 😁 And I'm not even mad that other people now need to implement the complicated stuff 😉

We shouldn't be sad that Pash got obsolete, but happy that a company took the reason for Pash to exist serious and took the idea to a professional level. And we guys can put our energy in other cool projects that desparately need contributors. 👍

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SRGOM Sep 4, 2016

Thank you guys for all you've done! I liked using Pash on linux.

SRGOM commented Sep 4, 2016

Thank you guys for all you've done! I liked using Pash on linux.

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vors Sep 15, 2016

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Thank you for all the hard work you put in Pash!
We watched this project closely and its existence warmed our hearts for years.
We would be happy if you decide to join and contribute to https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell
Your expertise and knowledge in PowerShell on non-Windows platforms would be a great fit for this new way of developing PowerShell.

-Sergei
PowerShell Team

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vors commented Sep 15, 2016

Thank you for all the hard work you put in Pash!
We watched this project closely and its existence warmed our hearts for years.
We would be happy if you decide to join and contribute to https://github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell
Your expertise and knowledge in PowerShell on non-Windows platforms would be a great fit for this new way of developing PowerShell.

-Sergei
PowerShell Team

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andschwa Sep 19, 2016

To echo @vors' sentiments, this project is really cool, and we would be incredibly happy to welcome you all to PowerShell/PowerShell.

Also, to quote @sburnicki:

I learned more about .NET and Powershell than I wanted to learn in the first place

I know exactly how you feel 😉

To echo @vors' sentiments, this project is really cool, and we would be incredibly happy to welcome you all to PowerShell/PowerShell.

Also, to quote @sburnicki:

I learned more about .NET and Powershell than I wanted to learn in the first place

I know exactly how you feel 😉

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