Skip to content
Laravel wrapper for Facebook's GraphQL
Branch: master
Clone or download
Permalink
Type Name Latest commit message Commit time
Failed to load latest commit information.
docs Add field deprecation to docs (#228) Mar 7, 2019
src Fix for infinite recursion when InputTypeObject contains self referen… Mar 7, 2019
tests Fix for infinite recursion when InputTypeObject contains self referen… Mar 7, 2019
.gitignore
.travis.yml
LICENSE Updated license Nov 1, 2018
Readme.md
composer.json
composer.lock add laravel 5.7 compatibility and phpunit 7 (#133) Sep 6, 2018
phpunit.xml
release.sh

Readme.md

Laravel GraphQL

Latest Stable Version Build Status License Get on Slack

Uses Facebook GraphQL with Laravel 5. It is based on the PHP implementation here. You can find more information about GraphQL in the GraphQL Introduction on the React blog or you can read the GraphQL specifications. This is a work in progress.

This package is compatible with Eloquent models or any other data source.

  • Allows creating queries and mutations as request endpoints
  • Custom middleware can be defined for each query/mutation
  • Queries return types, which can have custom privacy settings.
  • The queried fields will have the option to be retrieved dynamically from the database with the help of the SelectFields class.

It offers following features and improvements over the original package by Folklore:

  • Per-operation authorization
  • Per-field callback defining its visibility (e.g. hiding from unauthenticated users)
  • SelectFields abstraction available in resolve(), allowing for advanced eager loading and thus dealing with n+1 problems
  • Pagination support
  • Server-side support for query batching

Installation

Dependencies:

Installation:

- Require the package via Composer

composer require rebing/graphql-laravel
Laravel 5.5+

1. Laravel 5.5+ will autodiscover the package, for older versions add the following service provider

Rebing\GraphQL\GraphQLServiceProvider::class,

and alias

'GraphQL' => 'Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Facades\GraphQL',

in your config/app.php file.

2. Publish the configuration file

$ php artisan vendor:publish --provider="Rebing\GraphQL\GraphQLServiceProvider"

3. Review the configuration file

config/graphql.php
Lumen (experimental!)

1. Add the following service provider to the bootstrap/app.php file

$app->register(Rebing\GraphQL\GraphQLLumenServiceProvider::class);

2. Publish the configuration file

$ php artisan graphql:publish"

3. Add the configuration to the bootstrap/app.php file Important: this needs to be before the registration of the service provider

$app->configure('graphql');
...
$app->register(Rebing\GraphQL\GraphQLLumenServiceProvider::class);

4. Review the configuration file

config/graphql.php

Usage

Advanced Usage

Schemas

Schemas are required for defining GraphQL endpoints. You can define multiple schemas and assign different middleware to them, in addition to the global middleware. For example:

'schema' => 'default_schema',

'schemas' => [
    'default' => [
        'query' => [
            'example_query' => ExampleQuery::class,
        ],
        'mutation' => [
            'example_mutation'  => ExampleMutation::class,
        ],
    ],
    'user' => [
        'query' => [
            'profile' => App\GraphQL\Query\ProfileQuery::class
        ],
        'mutation' => [
        
        ],
        'middleware' => ['auth'],
    ],
],

Creating a query

First you need to create a type. The Eloquent Model is only required, if specifying relations.

Note: The selectable key is required, if it's a non-database field or not a relation

<?php

namespace App\GraphQL\Type;

use App\User;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Type as GraphQLType;

class UserType extends GraphQLType
{    
    protected $attributes = [
        'name'          => 'User',
        'description'   => 'A user',
        'model'         => User::class,
    ];

    public function fields()
    {
        return [
            'id' => [
                'type' => Type::nonNull(Type::string()),
                'description' => 'The id of the user',
                'alias' => 'user_id', // Use 'alias', if the database column is different from the type name
            ],
            'email' => [
                'type' => Type::string(),
                'description' => 'The email of user',
            ],
            // Uses the 'getIsMeAttribute' function on our custom User model
            'isMe' => [
                'type' => Type::boolean(),
                'description' => 'True, if the queried user is the current user',
                'selectable' => false, // Does not try to query this from the database
            ]
        ];
    }

    // If you want to resolve the field yourself, you can declare a method
    // with the following format resolve[FIELD_NAME]Field()
    protected function resolveEmailField($root, $args)
    {
        return strtolower($root->email);
    }    
}

Add the type to the config/graphql.php configuration file

'types' => [
    'user' => App\GraphQL\Type\UserType::class
]

You could also add the type with the GraphQL Facade, in a service provider for example.

GraphQL::addType(\App\GraphQL\Type\UserType::class, 'user');

Then you need to define a query that returns this type (or a list). You can also specify arguments that you can use in the resolve method.

<?php

namespace App\GraphQL\Query;

use App\User;
use GraphQL;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Query;

class UsersQuery extends Query
{
    protected $attributes = [
        'name' => 'Users query'
    ];

    public function type()
    {
        return Type::listOf(GraphQL::type('user'));
    }

    public function args()
    {
        return [
            'id' => ['name' => 'id', 'type' => Type::string()],
            'email' => ['name' => 'email', 'type' => Type::string()]
        ];
    }

    public function resolve($root, $args)
    {
        if (isset($args['id'])) {
            return User::where('id' , $args['id'])->get();
        }

        if (isset($args['email'])) {
            return User::where('email', $args['email'])->get();
        }

        return User::all();
    }
}

Add the query to the config/graphql.php configuration file

'schemas' => [
    'default' => [
        'query' => [
            'users' => App\GraphQL\Query\UsersQuery::class
        ],
        // ...
    ]
]

And that's it. You should be able to query GraphQL with a request to the url /graphql (or anything you choose in your config). Try a GET request with the following query input

query FetchUsers {
    users {
        id
        email
    }
}

For example, if you use homestead:

http://homestead.app/graphql?query=query+FetchUsers{users{id,email}}

Creating a mutation

A mutation is like any other query. It accepts arguments (which will be used to do the mutation) and returns an object of a certain type.

For example, a mutation to update the password of a user. First you need to define the Mutation:

<?php

namespace App\GraphQL\Mutation;

use App\User;
use GraphQL;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Mutation;    

class UpdateUserPasswordMutation extends Mutation
{
    protected $attributes = [
        'name' => 'UpdateUserPassword'
    ];

    public function type()
    {
        return GraphQL::type('user');
    }

    public function args()
    {
        return [
            'id' => ['name' => 'id', 'type' => Type::nonNull(Type::string())],
            'password' => ['name' => 'password', 'type' => Type::nonNull(Type::string())]
        ];
    }

    public function resolve($root, $args)
    {
        $user = User::find($args['id']);
        if(!$user) {
            return null;
        }

        $user->password = bcrypt($args['password']);
        $user->save();

        return $user;
    }
}

As you can see in the resolve() method, you use the arguments to update your model and return it.

You should then add the mutation to the config/graphql.php configuration file:

'schemas' => [
    'default' => [
        'mutation' => [
            'updateUserPassword' => App\GraphQL\Mutation\UpdateUserPasswordMutation::class
        ],
        // ...
    ]
]

You should then be able to use the following query on your endpoint to do the mutation:

mutation users {
    updateUserPassword(id: "1", password: "newpassword") {
        id
        email
    }
}

if you use homestead:

http://homestead.app/graphql?query=mutation+users{updateUserPassword(id: "1", password: "newpassword"){id,email}}

Adding validation to a mutation

It is possible to add validation rules to a mutation. It uses the Laravel Validator to perform validation against the $args.

When creating a mutation, you can add a method to define the validation rules that apply by doing the following:

<?php

namespace App\GraphQL\Mutation;

use App\User;
use GraphQL;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Mutation;

class UpdateUserEmailMutation extends Mutation
{
    protected $attributes = [
        'name' => 'UpdateUserEmail'
    ];

    public function type()
    {
        return GraphQL::type('user');
    }

    public function args()
    {
        return [
            'id' => ['name' => 'id', 'type' => Type::string()],
            'email' => ['name' => 'email', 'type' => Type::string()]
        ];
    }

    public function rules(array $args = [])
    {
        return [
            'id' => ['required'],
            'email' => ['required', 'email']
        ];
    }

    public function resolve($root, $args)
    {
        $user = User::find($args['id']);
        if (!$user) {
            return null;
        }

        $user->email = $args['email'];
        $user->save();

        return $user;
    }
}

Alternatively, you can define rules on each argument:

class UpdateUserEmailMutation extends Mutation
{

    //...

    public function args()
    {
        return [
            'id' => [
                'name' => 'id',
                'type' => Type::string(),
                'rules' => ['required']
            ],
            'email' => [
                'name' => 'email',
                'type' => Type::string(),
                'rules' => ['required', 'email']
            ]
        ];
    }

    //...

}

When you execute a mutation, it will return any validation errors that occur. Since the GraphQL specification defines a certain format for errors, the validation errors are added to the error object as a extra validation attribute. To find the validation error, you should check for the error with a message equals to 'validation', then the validation attribute will contain the normal errors messages returned by the Laravel Validator:

{
    "data": {
        "updateUserEmail": null
    },
    "errors": [
        {
            "message": "validation",
            "locations": [
                {
                    "line": 1,
                    "column": 20
                }
            ],
            "validation": {
                "email": [
                    "The email is invalid."
                ]
            }
        }
    ]
}

The validation errors returned can be customised by overriding the validationErrorMessages method on the mutation. This method should return an array of custom validation messages in the same way documented by Laravel's validation. For example, to check an email argument doesn't conflict with any existing data, you could perform the following:

Note: the keys should be in field_name.validator_type format so you can return specific errors per validation type.

public function validationErrorMessages ($args = []) 
{
    return [
        'name.required' => 'Please enter your full name',
        'name.string' => 'Your name must be a valid string',
        'email.required' => 'Please enter your email address',
        'email.email' => 'Please enter a valid email address',
        'email.exists' => 'Sorry, this email address is already in use',                     
    ];
}

File uploads

For uploading new files just use UploadType. This support of uploading files is based on https://github.com/jaydenseric/graphql-multipart-request-spec so you have to upload them as multipart form:

WARNING: when you are uploading files, Laravel will use FormRequest - it means that middlewares which are changing request, will not have any effect.

<?php

use GraphQL;
use GraphQL\Type\Definition\Type;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\UploadType;
use Rebing\GraphQL\Support\Mutation;

class UserProfilePhotoMutation extends Mutation
{
    protected $attributes = [
        'name' => 'UpdateUserProfilePhoto'
    ];

    public function type()
    {
        return GraphQL::type('user');
    }

    public function args()
    {
        return [
            'profilePicture' => [
                'name' => 'profilePicture',
                'type' => UploadType::getInstance(),
                'rules' => ['required', 'image', 'max:1500'],
            ],
        ];
    }

    public function resolve($root, $args)
    {
        $file = $args['profilePicture'];

        // Do something with file here...
    }
}

Note: You can test your file upload implementation using Altair as explained here.

Advanced usage

You can’t perform that action at this time.