Diversity, inclusion, and belonging at GitHub

GitHub was created for developers by developers. To build the best platform for you, we need to build a company that reflects the world we live in today. Since 2016, we’ve released annual diversity reports to hold ourselves accountable to our employees and the GitHub community.

In our third annual report, we examine our employee population by location, gender identity, racial and ethnic background, age, and for the first time, share data on upward mobility. We hope these reports will continue to push GitHub’s culture forward—and encourage transparency and accountability in the tech industry and in businesses around the world. No single company or team can change the status quo, but together, we can build change that matters.

Merritt Anderson, VP of Employee Experience and Engagement

Diversity of experience, background, and identity not only makes us better colleagues to one another, but amplifies our spirit of innovation.

Read the blog post

GitHub by the numbers

GitHub employees self-reported all data in this report. While self-identification is important, we know that the standard reporting categories mandated by the U.S. federal government are not as inclusive as they should be.

The following data reflects the state of diversity, inclusion, and belonging at GitHub on June 1, 2018. All numbers are rounded to the nearest percentage point, leading to some sections not adding to exactly 100%. The data refers to full-time employees as designated in our Human Resources Information System.

Geographic distribution

US remote 43%

San Francisco HQ 34%

International remote 22%

Home office 49%

San Francisco HQ 34%

Coworking space 10%

Local office 6%

GitHub’s distributed nature is a big part of our culture, so we expanded our reporting this year to include both geographic location and workplace type. Our remote workforce has grown by 3% this past year, and the majority of this workforce works from home. As we grow, we’ll continue to help talented Hubbers provide value regardless of where they live.

Total Hubbers: 888

US remote 42%

San Francisco HQ 38%

International remote 20%

Total Hubbers: 629

US remote 35%

San Francisco HQ 44%

International remote 20%

Total Hubbers: 576

high-5

Race & ethnicity (USA Only)

White 63%

Asian 13%

Black or African-American 5%

Hispanic or Latino 6%

Two or More Races 4%

Unreported 9%

Over the past year, the percentage of underrepresented minorities at GitHub has decreased by 1%. While we’re encouraged by the small but positive trends in overall and leadership representation of black Hubbers, we have work to do to create an ethnically diverse workforce. We’ll continue to invest in advancing black Hubbers and improving our workplace for Hubbers from all underrepresented groups.

White 69%

Asian 12%

Black or African-American 4%

Hispanic or Latino 4%

Two or More Races 6%

Unreported 6%

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

White 67%

Asian 11%

Black or African-American 4%

Hispanic or Latino 5%

Two or More Races 3%

Unreported 10%

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

White 58%

Asian 17%

Black or African-American 7%

Hispanic or Latino 7%

Two or More Races 5%

Unreported 7%

White 60%

Asian 14%

Black or African-American 4%

Hispanic or Latino 6%

Two or More Races 5%

Unreported 11%

White 61%

Asian 16%

Black or African-American 2%

Hispanic or Latino 5%

Two or More Races 8%

Unreported 8%

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

White 64%

Asian 13%

Black or African-American 5%

Hispanic or Latino 5%

Two or More Races 3%

Unreported 10%

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

White 53%

Asian 16%

Black or African-American 5%

Hispanic or Latino 8%

Two or More Races 7%

Unreported 11%

White 64%

Asian 12%

Black or African-American 2%

Hispanic or Latino 6%

Two or More Races 5%

Unreported 11%

White 63%

Asian 17%

Black or African-American 0%

Hispanic or Latino 3%

Two or More Races 7%

Unreported 10%

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

White 65%

Asian 13%

Black or African-American 1%

Hispanic or Latino 4%

Two or More Races 3%

Unreported 14%

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

White 57%

Asian 15%

Black or African-American 4%

Hispanic or Latino 7%

Two or More Races 7%

Unreported 10%

White 67%

Asian 6%

Black or African-American <1%

Hispanic or Latino 3%

Two or More Races 6%

Unreported 17%

Gender identity

Men 67%

Women 33%

Non-binary *

The number of women across the organization decreased from 37% in 2017 to 33% in 2018. We are committed to increasing the percentage of women and non-binary people at GitHub. Our Employee Experience and Engagement and Human Resources teams are working to design employee programs and to build inclusive processes that improve retention of women and employees of color. We’re tracking our progress using company-wide goals and accountability systems.

Men 67%

Women 33%

Non-binary *

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Men 79%

Women 21%

Non-binary *

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

* We don’t have enough self-reported data this year to share our representation of transgender and nonbinary Hubbers. We hope to share more on gender identification at GitHub in future reports.

Men 63%

Women 37%

Non-binary *

Men 66%

Women 34%

Non-binary *

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Men 78%

Women 22%

Non-binary *

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

Men 64%

Women 36%

Non-binary *

Men 65%

Women 35%

Non-binary *

"Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Men 78%

Women 22%

Non-binary *

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales).

Men 79%

Women 21%

Non-binary *

bg-shapes

Age distribution

The average Hubber is around 35 years old, and our age distribution is about the same this year as it was last year. We saw small increases (less than 1%) in the 35-39 and 40-49 age groups, and a 1% increase in employees ages 50-59. These numbers are generally in line with what we see across other tech companies, with GitHub skewing a bit toward the higher end of the spectrum.

Average age: 35 Median age: 34

Average age: 35 Median age: 33

Upward mobility

  • 2018

Promoted

Promoted

We’re sharing promotion rates* by gender and race for the first time because it’s important for all Hubbers to have equal opportunity to grow their careers at GitHub. Promotion rates for men and women across the company are about equal (20% women to 17% men), leaning in favor of women. Although this is a step in the right direction, we also found a slightly larger gap in promotion rates between white Hubbers and Hubbers from underrepresented backgrounds.

* This data refers to promotion rates among employees active between July 1, 2017 and June 1 2018. A promotion is defined as any time in this past year where a Hubber’s level or title changed in an upward fashion (pure compensation changes are not included). The comparison groups represent all employees in that demographic group that were active or on leave since the last diversity report.

Parental Status

40%

Providing people with the flexibility to start, support, and grow their families is an important part of building an inclusive workplace.

N/A

While our self-reported data on parental status is too limited to share this year, we have continued to actively support our parent-employees in big and small ways, from dedicated Slack channels to flexible hours and 20 weeks of paid parental leave.

Working toward change

We have work to do to build a truly diverse and inclusive workplace where everyone can belong, find career success, and embrace every part of their identities.

We’re working with organizations and experts who specialize in helping people from all backgrounds succeed in tech. This is not about any one company or team; this is an industry-wide challenge to solve. To shape the future in meaningful ways, we need to partner with tech companies, nonprofits, and more to effectuate change within GitHub and the broader tech industry.

Progress is a journey—but here’s how we plan to move forward.

Building networks across tech

We provide financial sponsorship and open our headquarters to organizations that mentor and support people from underrepresented backgrounds in tech. Techtonica and /dev/color are two examples of great organizations we’ve supported this year.

Techtonica trains low-income women of color in the Bay Area in technical skills and matches them with employers. We hosted Techtonica's eight inaugural apprentices at GitHub's San Francisco offices in July, building inclusion into our physical environment while giving back to a great local organization.

/dev/color connects black software engineers for peer mentoring and support. By supporting /dev/color, we provide talented engineers with professional development and community support as they grow their careers.

Creating opportunities to join GitHub

Talent is everywhere. Opportunity is not. Not everyone has a clear path to a job in tech, so we’ve created internship and apprenticeship programs in order to attract, train, and retain talented people from underrepresented backgrounds, with a focus on developers of color.

We’re launching our first official apprenticeship program in October. “Octoprenticeships” are six-month paid career development programs for people with non-traditional backgrounds. GitHub’s apprentices will work on real projects with a GitHub team and develop their skills alongside a mentor. Our goal is to hire at least 80% of our apprentices full time, and we hope to expand the program in future years. This year, we’re partnering with Path Forward, Sabio, and TechHire to recruit apprentices.

Read the blog post

techtonica /dev/color Path Forward tTechHire Oakland Sabio

Building a culture of belonging

Change starts from within. We’ve invested in building a strong infrastructure for diversity, inclusion, and belonging (DI&B) throughout our organization by hiring dedicated DI&B experts, creating a group of internal inclusion advisors to partner with our DI&B Team, offering unconscious bias and inclusive leadership workshops and supporting the organization of new employee resource groups (ERGs).

We’re also building an ambitious roadmap for the future, which includes building checks against unconscious bias into the way we build GitHub, hire candidates, and advance employees.

Founding our first employee resource group (ERG)

Our first chartered ERG, the Blacktocats, launched at GitHub Universe 2017. Together they have established a foundation for employee-created community and developed a comprehensive roadmap for change both in and outside of GitHub. In their first year, they partnered with the Talent Acquisition Team to recruit candidates at the National Society of Black Engineers conference. In addition, they created an open source course on Git, GitHub, Selenium, and Ruby scripting with Greater Than, a Baltimore-based non-profit, to help previously incarcerated individuals become entry-level Quality Assurance Engineers. The group strategically uses each new hire onboarding class to share its mission, recruit members and help foster an immediate sense of belonging among Black new hires.